#1
Heya, this has been bothering me for quite some time now, so here goes.

I'm a bit paranoid that I'm not using the correct picking motion when alt. picking. I have my forearm resting on the bottom end [top corner, nearest me] at a 45 degree angle to the guitar, and my wrist rests around the bridge.

When I pick, am I meant to do a solid up and down motion keeping my forearm/arm still? Because what I seem to do at the moment is twist my forearm at the same time as I pick, and this doesn't utilise the wrist as much.

P.S. I'm not new to guitar, I've been playing for about a year and a bit, but I'm concentrating on technique at the mo, and this is bothering me the most.

Thanks.
Ibanez RG2550E Prestige
Squier Bullet
Roland Cube 30W
#3
What I was asking was whether I should do an up and down movement with my wrist, or twist my forearm and a lesser movement with my wrist?

Sorry if it was unclear.
Ibanez RG2550E Prestige
Squier Bullet
Roland Cube 30W
#4
What I was saying is that you'll never have an effecient picking technique if you're using the bridge as a crutch for your wrist.

Go and read this.
#5
It's not a matter of me using the bridge as a crutch, I just tend to have it there most of the time to mute strings from ringing out and palm muting.

I've gone through the anchoring my pinky issue quite a few times, and find it situational, I can pick with a floating wrist or anchored.

Question though.. do I isolate movement to my wrist, so all the picking's coming from that? In an up-down motion, or should I use more of my arm? Looking for the 'most' efficient way here.
Ibanez RG2550E Prestige
Squier Bullet
Roland Cube 30W
#6
definitely use your wrist for the movement, using your arm will easily tire you very quickly and
when I use my wrist I see that I can play faster, this helps if your into black dahlia murder stuff like me
#7
Well, I do listen to BDM now and again, but that's not the point. If using only my wrist allows me to play faster, for longer, then that seems to be the most efficient way.
Ibanez RG2550E Prestige
Squier Bullet
Roland Cube 30W
#8
Picking is a combination of wrist AND arm. Anyone that tells you wrist only either
doesn't know what they're talking about, or possibly they can tremelo pick a
single string, but couldn't pick across strings to save thier life.

The first thing you should learn is to control the pick with your arm with an elbow
motion and keeping the wrist relaxed. String to string control is critical for playing
well and that should be your first focus. When your arm development begins to
take hold, you'll find wrist development much easier and and you will have more
control and fluidity.
#9
So I should pick with a floating wrist, using my elbow/arm to enable to wrist to get to different strings?
Ibanez RG2550E Prestige
Squier Bullet
Roland Cube 30W
#11
Does resting your picking arm on the guitar count as anchoring? Or can you rest your arm on the corner of the guitar and then have your wrist floating off the bridge?
#12
Quote by shmooty
Does resting your picking arm on the guitar count as anchoring? Or can you rest your arm on the corner of the guitar and then have your wrist floating off the bridge?


Ideally you wouldn?t want any part of your arm touching the guitar. Completely unanchored.

You have to find the right placement for your arm. If it?s too high, too low, pushed in too far, too far out, anything, just the smallest little thing can add unwanted tension that will hamper your picking.

You?re going to have to experiment through the course of a few days looking for the spot that lets you have your arm entirely floating over the guitar body without tension.

It takes a while to find the right spot ? it is there, you just have to find it.
#14
Quote by Johnljones7443
Ideally you wouldn?t want any part of your arm touching the guitar. Completely unanchored.

You have to find the right placement for your arm. If it?s too high, too low, pushed in too far, too far out, anything, just the smallest little thing can add unwanted tension that will hamper your picking.

You?re going to have to experiment through the course of a few days looking for the spot that lets you have your arm entirely floating over the guitar body without tension.

It takes a while to find the right spot ? it is there, you just have to find it.


I've been trying that a bit, but it seems to make my arm get tired after a while... is that because I do it wrong, or because i'm just not used to it?
#15
DO NOT MOVE YOUR ARM AT ALL, FAST PICK WITH ARM=tendinitis=NO MORE WACKING OFF, OR GUITAR.
picking comes from up and down from the wrist, and minor movent in the fingers for small adjustments (actually tiny circles in the fingers will help you immensly with speed and clarity, but it is very hard to explain and to understand, but if u want i can explain it.
#16
Quote by Soundb4speed
DO NOT MOVE YOUR ARM AT ALL, FAST PICK WITH ARM=tendinitis=NO MORE WACKING OFF, OR GUITAR.
picking comes from up and down from the wrist, and minor movent in the fingers for small adjustments (actually tiny circles in the fingers will help you immensly with speed and clarity, but it is very hard to explain and to understand, but if u want i can explain it.


Yes, I'd like that explained.

Because the advice I've seen from good players and good teachers is learn the
arm control/movement first. Learn larger muscle control before learning smaller
muscle control. You'll need both.

That makes sense to me and its worked for me.

What are your qualifications?