#1
Just a quick question that will probably sound really stupid...

How do you keep time when your playing a solo that has a lot of quick notes in it.

The reason I ask is that I was at band practice yesterday and we played creeping death like we have done for a few months now and the lead comes and away I go. The solo was a-ok apart from the fact it was out of time. It sounded really bad......really, really bad....so bad in fact I felt very ashamed.

I've never really come across this before but then again I've never really played in a band that are semi serious........

So timing.......tell me your secrets.....

Many thanks
#3
So not wanting to sound dumb, but how do you relate that to a situation where the song gets played at a different tempo to the recorded version.....the version you've been practicing against?

Or am I looking at this from the totally wrong point of view?
#4
listen out for key parts of the rhythm axe and use them as a reference.
For example in creeping death there is a run down the neck at the first key change so just make sure you play this part when this change happens.
Pick out sections of the solo and relate them back to what the rhytm, bass or drums are doing.
In using this method even if you go out of time you can always stop and drop back in when appropriate.
But remember ALWAYS LISTEN TO WHAT EVERYBODY ELSE IS DOING or you aint gonna get far. Good Luck
#5
Quote by Skuzzmo
So not wanting to sound dumb, but how do you relate that to a situation where the song gets played at a different tempo to the recorded version.....the version you've been practicing against?

Or am I looking at this from the totally wrong point of view?


A metronome improves your timing in general - use it as a practice tool to help you keep in time - that way you'll be prepared to keep in time with other instruments in a band. I'm looking at keeping in time as a whole - rather than in one particular song.

If you're looking to practice in time with a particular song - download GuitarPro and the required song and adjust the tempo to how you see fit - or only use tabs that are notated with timing.

A strong and solid feel for rhythm is important - it's the basis for all your lead playing. Without good timing, your lead playing is going to sound bad. Perhaps you should delve into rhythm guitar and see how much that helps too.

You need to develop the ability to feel the beat or meter all times, that's when your band is in the groove.
#6
Nice one, thanks for the advice and taking the time. I appreciate it.........

Thx.
#8
^exactly, it's also good in most cases to see the drums as a metronome, as well as the bass (that is, if you have a decent drummer/bassist)...when practicing, use a metronome, but if for some reason you can't obtain one, you can always keep your foot tapping at a steady beat and play quarters, eighths, sixteenths, or whatever, in time, accenting the first note of the "measure" like FP said
Quote by BigFatSandwich
it took you 15 consecutive hours of practice to realize that playing guitar makes you better at playing guitar. congratulations.


Quote by Sharp_as_steel
Axe_grinder pwns!!!!



Member #2 of the "Official UG Teabaggers' Cult". PM Slayer224 to join.
#11
^Am I the only one who has trouble with that technique? I can't seem to incorporate the rhythm into a solo
#12
Quote by Skuzzmo
Just a quick question that will probably sound really stupid...

How do you keep time when your playing a solo that has a lot of quick notes in it.

The reason I ask is that I was at band practice yesterday and we played creeping death like we have done for a few months now and the lead comes and away I go. The solo was a-ok apart from the fact it was out of time. It sounded really bad......really, really bad....so bad in fact I felt very ashamed.

I've never really come across this before but then again I've never really played in a band that are semi serious........

So timing.......tell me your secrets.....

Many thanks

Focus on on particular beat and pretend its in the solo follow that and you should get through ok.
#13
dont go off in to your own world make sure your listening to what the other players are playing. I play the rhythm in my band and the lead guitarist is reallly good but if were not playing together his timing gets off. He had trouble with timming at first then i told him to just listen to where the rest of us are and it will help you and he quickly became much better. he just listens where the rest of us are and it helps him so much. so listen where the rhythm is.

If you got a key change coming up at the same time as a rhythm change listen for it and if you hit the change as the rest of the band your doing fine.

So the Key is just listen to where everyone else is. thats what the rhythm is there for is to keep the lead in time
Member of UG's Gain \/\/hores - pm gpderek09 to join
#14
Thx to all...this advice is fantastic.

I've cracked out the metronome and decided I need to practice more. I think I've been a bit lazy in that department. I've watched the Gilbert vids and decided amongst other things that I've got fat fingers...lol.....also, I'm looking forward to trying out the suggestions you've had.

I will crack this..........

Thx again
#15
Dude, just listen to the song and where you are in it when you take yourself out of your own little lead world (you know what im talking about during the solo) you should be concentrating on both how the band sounds as a whole and how you sound Its hard i know but ya thats what i do
UNLEASH THE FOCKING BURGERS