#1
you know how some songs will have a clean sound, then distortion, and then a heavier/louder distortion? how does this work? is a compressor needed or what?
#2
2 differently voiced dirty channels on amp

or overdrive pedal for some extra kick + allready distorted sound


there are many ways you can go at this
#3
different types of distortion pedals, different settings on pedals, stuff like that?
#4
im not sure, cause if u use 2 distortion pedals it gets all funky if u use both at the same time, and it would b weird steppin on 2 pedals at once to turn 1 on and the other off
#5
Recorded songs can work in any number of ways, as you don't record all at once, but track by track.

If you're talking about a live situation, some amps have more than two channels, some people use overdrive pedals to drive the amp into higher distortion. You could set a crunchy distortion on the amp, so it's nice and light, then have it go heavy with the OD pedal on.

Also, if you're not talking about big tube amps, there are modeling amps out there that allow you to save settings and switch between settings with the push of a button.
#6
Quote by !!Dope Man!!
im not sure, cause if u use 2 distortion pedals it gets all funky if u use both at the same time, and it would b weird steppin on 2 pedals at once to turn 1 on and the other off


In the studio you can just finish one part then redadjust your settings for the other part

Live you can have your guitar tech switch things for you or you can have a fancy MIDI switching setup that allows turn dozens of effects on/off at once


You could also have different settings in rack preamps too, or different rack preamps for different sounds...
#8
Quote by !!Dope Man!!
what does a compressor do? and yes, compress. but does it make it like quieter?


It works around a certain threshold level for volume, whatever is above the threshold is made queiter, whatever is below the threshold level is made louder.
It evens out differences in dynamics