#1
Hey guys, I've been jamming with friends or alone to a drum machine and doing improvisations, switching between major/pentatonic majors/pentatonic minor scales and I've got "note-finding" down pretty well but I still don't have quite have the grasp of phrasing or any other cool techniques.

Any advice for exercises or practices or just general things to get my solos from "ok-technically-right" to "wow, that's good"?

Any help is appreciated.
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#5
I have three really good ways for helping you improve your lead... but it takes time. And someone will have to ask nicely.
Quote by les_kris
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#7
Quote by Corwinoid
I have three really good ways for helping you improve your lead... but it takes time. And someone will have to ask nicely.

purdy please?
#8
as for phrasing if you want to experiment you can try to emulate jazz horns phrases by playing the flutter or notes then pausing where they would take a breathe then continuing to play. you can come up with some good stuff like that.
#9
Good phrasing is an instrinsic property of your playing that is tough to learn. However, it CAN be taught.

*cough*come on, Cor!*cough*

There's no quick-fix to learning how to phrase---lots of practice and lots of time will do the trick nicely.
Looking for my India/Django.
#10
Quote by Corwinoid
I have three really good ways for helping you improve your lead... but it takes time. And someone will have to ask nicely.


I'm all ears, if you're sharing...please?
#11
Alright, generally there are three things that a lead player should focus on.

1) Mobility: Your ability to move around the neck, and work outside of box patterns
2) Coherency: The ability to relate different parts of a solo to each other, and a solo as a whole to the melodic content of the rest of the music
3) Phrasing: The ability to make the guitar sound like more than just the notes.

All three contribute to the 'whole' of what we would call phrasing on the guitar. Certain note patterns make sense when phrased (in the sense of placed) a certain way, and certain phrases sound better when played a certain way. It's easy enough to think "Oh, I need to work on my dynamics." But it's hard to make dynamics make sense if you don't understand why (this is especially true if you play with higher distortion, as you lose a whole lot more of your dynamic range, which is already fairly limited on a guitar anyway).

I'll go over each part of that, in that order, and each time we'll play around with it a little bit, and add some ideas to what's happening. Each time a section comes around, you'll be able to take what you picked up from the other sections and apply it to what we're working on next.

These excersizes tend to be extremely short, but the nice thing about them is that you can revist them again later, and do them completely differently.

So we're going to start by playing a little game to work on mobility on the neck. This starts of easy, but will get progressively more challenging. Here's how this works, at least the first time. I'm going to give you a three chord progression, whatever my little heart desires, and two notes, a starting note and an ending note. The excersize is for you to link the two notes on the neck, with whatever you want in the middle (given a few 'rules').

But there's a catch... ok, there are two catches. I'm not going to give you the notes as pitches, I'm going to give you them as positions on the neck -- meaning that whatever run you decide to come up with will start wherever I want you to on the neck, and end wherever I want you to.

The other caveat is that you have to be happy with whatever you come up with.

There's no time limit to this, you can take however long you want, or decide it's not worth you're time. Whenever someone wants to go on they can post up, and after one or two people have something and are ready to work on more, I'll post up the next part.

The entire idea is to do this really relaxed, spend maybe two or three minutes on it a day, not more than that, and just come up with some ideas inside of a fixed framework.

That said, round 1 of our little game goes like this: The extra 'rules' this time are that you can't use a single type of note; for instance I don't want to hear an 8th note run the entire time, any more than I want to hear a 16th note run the entire time. Break your rhythm up a little bit, don't be afraid to use a quarter note (or half note, though you'll probably only have time for one if you do) here or there, and don't be afraid of using a dotted rhythm somewhere along the lines. By the same token, I'm not after speed either -- either tempo wise or rhythmically. Keep the pace for this pretty mellow, something in your very comfortable range, and no notes smaller than a 16th. Personally, I'd probably take it somewhere between 90-120 bpm, depending on my mood; remember, relaxed and casual.

Finally, no scalar runs -- let me clarify that. The ear likes motion by second, so A- B- C- D- C- B- C, sounds pretty nice. Your playing sounds like you're playing scales when you keep that up too long. There's no set rule for this, but just try to break that up a little, the same way you want to try and break your rhythms up. As a tip -- just about any time you change strings and you're not playing between your index and your pinky, you're breaking up the scale.

So, the chords that you'll be "playing over" are G - Am - D7, (for you nuts, that's I-ii-V7) each chord getting one measure. Start on the G at the 10th fret, A string, any time in the first measure, and link it to the D on the B string at the 15th. End on the down beat with the D chord.

Some of you will notice that those two notes can be hit in the same box, if you use a stretch pattern. Don't. Here's how I want you to look at this: Treat the 10th fret and the 12th fret as two different positions for your index finger, and make a position shift as part of your run. It's a pretty small shift, and only one is needed; if you want add some more.

What you should start to see as you play around with this are patterns of putting two notes together, instead of patterns for scales.

You might have fun with this, also, if you specifically break the rules I mentioned (though, I don't want to see it if you do). ie. come up with a chromatic run that's all 16ths, makes sense, and links those two notes together. Or other little variations like that.
Quote by les_kris
Corwinoid is God
I'm not even God-like... I've officially usurped the Almighty's throne.
Click here to worship me.

Member #3 of the Corwinoid Fan Club
#12
I think this is a little too advanced for me. But thank you for the post anyway. I'm going to bookmark it to come back to later.