Page 1 of 3
#1
The Fundamentals: Picking technique

Introduction:
Poor picking technique can be one of the most hampering effects to your playing. The lack of dynamic control and speed can hinder your expressiveness and overall playing experience. This is why it is important that we look down at every single detail of it, and get the most of out every muscle/movement we can make. You've probably heard "do what?s comfortable for you!" That?s the biggest load of bull**** you'll ever hear. There is a way that works and the way that works better. I'm going to try to show you the "Better" way.

Holding the Pick:
Drop your arm by your side and see how your hand is, using no exertion. Pay attention to how it is, maybe your hand naturally goes into a loose fist? Maybe the fingers are gently bent, or maybe they're even fully extended (who knows?). This is the position you will want your unused fingers in. The key to speed is the lack of tension and increased feel of freedom. If you are using more then one finger to hold the pick, you're using more muscles then are required to hold the pick and thus creating more tension. I highly recommend using your index and thumb to hold the pick. Using the pads of both fingers, and having the thumb bent as far back without causing tension in the forearm. To optimize control in your picking technique it is a must that you hold your pick as close to the tip as you can. The closer to the tip you have held, the less "knock back" you have to deal with from the pick hitting the string.

Picking motion:
There are many ways you can actually get the pick through the other string. Wrist movement, elbow movement, or even shoulder movement. Your wrist is made for small minute movements, for the sake of avoiding injury, use it. The elbow is not made for small movements and it can be almost impossible to reach high-speeds without tensing up and becoming more prone to injury. I find the elbow to be more useful for crossing strings. More on that later.

There are 3 types of motions that are common in picking technique. I will paraphrase for you, but a common article that describes these motions (and a WHOLE lot more on picking technique)is here http://www.tuckandpatti.com/pick-finger_tech.html. The fastest speeds can be achieved when different motions are mixed.

Translation:

Translation is a very horizontal movement, side to side. Put your hand on your desk. Now using your wrist, make it go left and right, left and right. That is translation. Watch and feel which muscles move. This is my least favorite form of movement. It is impossible to reach high speeds without tension your whole arm up. When you get
to the point where you can't go any faster, you'll end up bring your elbow into it and then you'll just be doing fast spasmodic movements. Despite using this motion, there are plenty of players out there who have considerable control over their picking. John Petrucci, Fransisco (I forget how to spell his last name), and Rusty Cooley are just a few players who play this way.

Rotation:

Rotation is a movement that is similar to turning a door-knob. This is generally a better way to pick. I like rotation because it almost naturally moves through the arc of the strings. More on that later.

Oscillation:

Oscillation is considered the best movement to pick with. Pretend you are knocking a door, notice which muscles are being moved. Those are the muscles that are being used when you oscillate. Oscillation is also very similar to how most people write, and therefore feels quite natural when you apply it to picking. You have to figure out how you want to apply the muscles used in knocking a door to picking. Oscillation picking often looks much like a "V" if that helps any of you guys. Popularly cited players for oscillation are Shawn Lane and George Benson.

Note: Oscillation picking can often times look quite similar to translation, but the muscles being used are very different.

Combination of motions:

As stated earlier, the fastest speeds are achieved by combining the motions. I highly recommend combining Rotation and Oscillation. When combining rotation and oscillation, it seems to naturally minimize the movement of your pick, making it as small as possible. A key to speed is economy of movement, and rotation and oscillation help minimize the motion in your wrist. Combining rotation and oscillation is great because the motion of your wrist doing rotation naturally moves with the arc of the strings, and makes for faster string-crossing and string-skipped licks. The whole natural feel of rotation and oscillation makes those 15nps licks not feel so impossible anymore!

Elbow movement:

The elbow IMO can be made the most use out of when used for crossing strings. When used in combination with a wrist moving in a rotary manner, you can quickly jump from string to string very easily and smoothly. Since the crossing of strings is typically less frequent and a larger motion, you don't run much of a risk of injuring your self and it's quite easy to keep tension out of your elbow and shoulder with just a little bit of correct practice.

Shoulder Movement:
Ugh...**** that, the further you move up your arm, the more difficult it gets to stay relaxed and tension free and keeping movements minute. I do not recommend using shoulder movement for much of anything, as IMO you can do the same much more easily with your elbow.

Anchor or not to anchor...That is the question!!!

One of the most heavily debated subjects among technique junkies and guitar enthusiasts is on whether to or not to anchor. When you anchor, you are applying pressure to the guitar. There are 2 ways to anchor.

1.)Anchoring with pinky to pick guard

2.)Anchoring with hand to bridge/lower string.

Now if I was to promote either one of those, I would promote anchoring with your hand to the lower strings/bridge. When you anchor with your pinky to the pick guard, you have to extend your pinky. Last time I checked NOBODYS hand naturally had their pinky extended. This causes unnecessary tension and results in slowing you down and making things much more difficult.

Anchoring is a crutch. And only offers one positive aspect. When playing in a live experience, you can jump up and down, spin around, pelvic thrust, shake your ass, take a dump, pretty much anything and not miss a note. Chances are you are not going to be jumping up and down like a dick-head while soloing, which is when you will most likely need speed for more complex lines then chugging death-metal riffs or tremolo picked chord tones or whatever.

Playing Un-anchored is ideal, ESPECIALLY while soloing. When un-anchored you've got a more free range of movement and no added tension from the friction of being anchored or the pressure having to be applied. Tension is the numero uno speed killer, stay as loose as possible at all times, it is impossible to stay as loose as you possibly can while anchored. You only get used to the tension and stop noticing it. Here is a pretty little analogy...

Pretend your room is empty of stuff. Anchoring is much like trying to reach your max running speed inside your room. You have very little room to gain speed and before 3 or 4 steps you've got to make a turn and you lose speed on that and so on and so forth. You don't have freedom or room to move.

Pretend you're in a wide open valley or plain, or a gym with no fat kids or benches in the way. You can obviously have room to reach your max speed, room to turn with the least amount of speed lost etc. You will never reach your max speed while playing anchored. There is too much added un-necessary movement and your hand is locked in. Not as large (or free) range of motion available to you.

Alt picking or Eco-picking:

For those who do not know, alternate picking is a strict up-stroke and down-stroke pattern played on fast licks (or any lick really, but is a must when trying to reach hyper-speed). Economy Picking (or Eco-picking for short) is taking the shortest path to the string. Much like sweeping, if you are playing a 3-note per string pattern like this you'd be playing it like so if you were doing it eco style.

^ - upstroke

v - downstroke


 
           V  ^  V  V  ^  V
       e|-------------------
       B|-------------------
       G|-------------------
       D|-----------12-14-15
       A|--12-14-15---------
       E|------------------- 



Alternate picking has a definite feel of consistency and forces you to make larger movements at times when crossing strings so you have an increased feel of freedom. With eco-picking long, complex licks at hyper-speed, you end up inside picking (picking inside the strings) almost the whole time and it feels like you are locked into the tiny space in between strings. Alt picking forces you to outside pick more and even out the amount of inside and outside-picking so you do not feel trapped. I recommend using alt-picking, but I am also an avid eco-picker. I highly recommend you learn how to both eco-pick and alt-pick.


cont'd next post...
#2
Continued...

Minor Details and Notes about Picking:

There are a few minor details that do not deserve their own mini-section, but need to be taken account for and not forgotten. You must always remember that the strings are in an arc, that the neck radius isn't actually really flat (Unless you're playing a Shawn Lane sig). Treat the strings like they are (in an arc) and you'll be richly rewarded with effortless string-skipping and crossing. Pick angle is another thing to account for. The more perpendicular the pick is to the strings, the harder the attack will be and sharper the sound. The more angled the pick is, the easier it is to get through the string, but it will sound more dull. Experiment and find a comfortable medium, or if you don't like that, go either way, hell its your tone. (Back-tracking to the beginning about how to hold the pick, holding the pick with the pads of your index and thumb makes it easier to apply pressure in different parts of the pick, making it very easy to angle the pick in different directions and changing the sound according to how you want it to be.)

Thats about it, good luck and happy picking!!


Any good? Too long? Too boring? Educated thoughts and comment are welcome.
#3
If you posted video links (of rotation and oscillation in particular) that would be smashing.

But it's good either way, nice job I'm sure you'll get some crap about the anchoring though... oh well.
#5
for my 2 years of guitar playing..i've always played with using 2 fingers holding the pick..the index and the middle (and the thumb). And now that i read that you mentioned that using anymore fingers is extra tension.....it really sucks :P

Now i'm trying to just use my index and thumb and its way more uncomfortable and i have to hold the pick tight otherwise the pick will just shift sideways when i strum or pick...is it really necessary to change the way i hold my pick?
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#6
Do you want to borrow my awful bmp of the motions from the technique thread?


Yea sure!

If you posted video links (of rotation and oscillation in particular) that would be smashing.

But it's good either way, nice job I'm sure you'll get some crap about the anchoring though... oh well.


I've got a camera lying around here somewhere...If I can find it I'll try making a vid.


Now i'm trying to just use my index and thumb and its way more uncomfortable and i have to hold the pick tight otherwise the pick will just shift sideways when i strum or pick...is it really necessary to change the way i hold my pick?


A transition will always be uncomfortable. At first, I do recommend that you hold your pick tightly to get a feel for how it should be held. Once your fingers get more used to that way of holding the pick , you'll be able to loosen up. Also, when I say that you should hold your pick as close to the bottom as you can, I mean it. I have about 2millimeters sticking out from my thumb, if you hold it like that, its very easy to maintain control over the pick.
#7
Actually, re-reading this article, i dont think its detailed enough. I think you honestly need to go much more in depth in the simplest terms possible. Explain the advantages and disadvantages of all the movements a bit more as well. Translation = super even, etc.
#8
One thing, it's Fransesco Fareri

Another, some people might consider the "no Fat kids or benches" statement in your gym to room analogy offensive. I don't but some might.

Also, another way to anchor is to rest your forearm against the body of the guitar. Probably the most common way actually.
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#9
Ok, I've got something to say about oscillation. Alot of you might be very confused at trying to figure out this motion (like I was earlier). However, just imagine making a "V" motion, like Erc said. In order to do this, you have to oscillate your wrist. There you go, that's oscillatory picking. It feels VERY natural to me, and I guess that's why I didn't grasp oscillatory picking earlier. I was thinking, "that surely cannot be oscillatory picking, that's too 'easy'. It has to be much harder than that". But in truth, I had been semi-oscillating.

Anyways, it's not as "weird" or "hard" as it seems. It's a very natural motion. Oscillation combined with a little bit of elbow and rotation makes for killer speed.

Quote by apocalypse13
One thing, it's Fransesco Fareri

Another, some people might consider the "no Fat kids or benches" statement in your gym to room analogy offensive. I don't but some might.

Also, another way to anchor is to rest your forearm against the body of the guitar. Probably the most common way actually.


I think that type of anchoring is acceptable, because your arm falls on the guitar naturally, at least that's what alot have told me. I think it'd be quite hard to hold it out and NOT become tense as a result.
R.I.P. Shawn "Memphis Monster" Lane

Member #8 of the Ibanez RG5xx & up club PM tombo32 to join < 110% credit to t2russo
Last edited by waylay00 at Jun 28, 2006,
#10
Actually, re-reading this article, i dont think its detailed enough. I think you honestly need to go much more in depth in the simplest terms possible. Explain the advantages and disadvantages of all the movements a bit more as well. Translation = super even, etc.


Allright, I'll work on that tomorrow =)

One thing, it's Fransesco Fareri

Another, some people might consider the "no Fat kids or benches" statement in your gym to room analogy offensive. I don't but some might.

Also, another way to anchor is to rest your forearm against the body of the guitar. Probably the most common way actually.


Heh, I forgot that I even put that phrase in there 0_o, I suppose I can take it out.

I'll edit fransisco's correct name in tomorrow also! (Along with revisions, that is if I actually get to it...swim meet tomorrow 0_o)

The arm anchoring isn't NEARLY as hampering as a finger/wrist anchor. I suppose I should address it though, so I will.
#11
Um... Erc you should probably mention that its not exactly manditory and that different people can be suited to different things. i.e Steve Morse, he anchors everywhere and uses three fingers to hold the pick.
#12
But Steve Morse has carpal tunnel as a result of his relatively poor picking habits (i.e. - anchoring the pinky, etc).

True, you can get very fast while anchored, but the amount of physical force required to do so puts ALOT of unnecessary strain on your body, which can lead to injuries.
R.I.P. Shawn "Memphis Monster" Lane

Member #8 of the Ibanez RG5xx & up club PM tombo32 to join < 110% credit to t2russo
#13
What is the difference between rotation and oscillating? If you are knocking a door, why would you pick with the same muscels?

Quote by Robbie n strat
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#14
Wow... that really helped me... I suck... and my worst uhm.. subject.. is picking.. thank you so much!
#15
The Fundamentals: Picking technique

Written by: Eric Druseikis (Erc)

Introduction:
Poor picking technique can be one of the most hampering effects to your playing. The lack of dynamic control and speed can hinder your expressiveness and overall playing experience. This is why it is important that we look down at every single detail of it, and get the most of out every muscle/movement we can make. You've probably heard "do what?s comfortable for you!" That?s the biggest load of bull**** you'll ever hear. There is a way that works and the way that works better. I'm going to try to show you the "Better" way.

Holding the Pick:
Drop your arm by your side and see how your hand is, using no exertion. Pay attention to how it is, maybe your hand naturally goes into a loose fist? Maybe the fingers are gently bent, or maybe they're even fully extended (who knows?). This is the position you will want your unused fingers in. The key to speed is the lack of tension and increased feel of freedom. If you are using more then one finger to hold the pick, you're using more muscles then are required to hold the pick and thus creating more tension. I highly recommend using your index and thumb to hold the pick. Using the pads of both fingers, and having the thumb bent as far back without causing tension in the forearm. To optimize control in your picking technique it is a must that you hold your pick as close to the tip as you can. The closer to the tip you have held, the less "knock back" you have to deal with from the pick hitting the string.

Knockback

If you do not know what I mean by ?knock back,? grab a hold of your pick. Hold it loosely near the top and pick a string. You can feel how the pick moves very rigidly through the string and the force ?ripples? up the pick to your fingers. Do this for a short period of time, maybe 1 minute or 2 minute, evenly picking the strings as described. You soon feel a sort of tiredness or slight pain where you fingers held the pick because of having to absorb the shock on the little amount of index finger being used. When you hold the pick very near the bottom, you have more surface area absorbing the pressure, thus making it easier to pick.


Picking motion:
There are many ways you can actually get the pick through the other string. Wrist movement, elbow movement, or even shoulder movement. Your wrist is made for small minute movements, for the sake of avoiding injury, use it. The elbow is not made for small movements and it can be almost impossible to reach high-speeds without tensing up and becoming more prone to injury. I find the elbow to be more useful for crossing strings. More on that later.

There are 3 types of motions that are common in picking technique. I will paraphrase for you, but a common article that describes these motions (and a WHOLE lot more on picking technique)is here http://www.tuckandpatti.com/pick-finger_tech.html. The fastest speeds can be achieved when different motions are mixed.

Translation:

Translation is a very horizontal movement, side to side. Put your hand on your desk. Now using your wrist, make it go left and right, left and right. That is translation. Watch and feel which muscles move. In translation, the horizontal movement to the right (or when playing guitar, towards the floor) is a down stroke, and the horizontal movement to the left (or up towards the ceiling) is your up stroke. This is my least favorite form of movement. It is impossible to reach high speeds without tension your whole arm up. When you get to the point where you can't go any faster, you'll end up bring your elbow into it and then you'll just be doing fast spasmodic movements. Despite using this motion, there are plenty of players out there who have considerable control over their picking. John Petrucci, Fransesco Fareri, and Rusty Cooley are just a few players who play this way.

Advantages: Translation is often very even sounding. There is a time and place for everything, so master translation if you will, as you can only benefit from the tonal versatility.

Disadvantages: It is impossible to reach hyper-speed without locking up and going into spasmodic movements.

Rotation:

Rotation is a movement that is similar to turning a doorknob. It very much moves in an arc. Stick your index finger while pretending to turn the doorknob. You can clearly see the arc that is being formed. In Rotational movement, the movement (when applied to guitar playing) towards the floor is your down stroke, and the movement coming back up more towards your stomach when exaggerated, is your upstroke. This is generally a better way to pick. I like rotation because it almost naturally moves through the arc of the strings. More on that later.

Advantages: Rotational movement moves naturally with the arc of the strings, it makes for super fast string-crossing and what not. I highly advise using this motion somewhere in your playing. You can also with this movement get under the string and pull out quite hard (in a vertical manner) and get a ?snap? to your sound. You can get tonal versatility out of this movement, so master it.

Disadvantages: Not as fast as oscillation.

Oscillation:

Oscillation is considered the best movement to pick with. Pretend you are knocking a door, notice which muscles are being moved. Those are the muscles that are being used when you oscillate. Oscillation is also very similar to how most people write, and therefore feels quite natural when you apply it to picking. You have to figure out how you want to apply the muscles used in knocking a door to picking. Oscillation picking often looks much like a "V" if that helps any of you guys. With oscillation movement, the ?up wrist? movement of knocking a door is your down stroke. The movement back down (the force that you would hit the door with) would be translated to your upstroke on the guitar. Popularly cited players for oscillation picking are Shawn Lane and George Benson.

Advantages: Oscillation picking is the fastest most efficient way to play. When combined with either Rotation or Translation, you can achieve excruciatingly fast speeds. Also the way you hold the pick (as described in ?Holding the Pick?) can allow you to hybrid pick much more easily and have access to pinch harmonics easily. (and in multiple fashions.)

Disadvantages: The way you actually pick Oscillation requires you to have a strong hold on the pick (as described in ?Holding the Pick?). Getting a loosely held pick attack sound is seemingly impossible while doing oscillatory motion.

Note: Oscillation picking can often times look quite similar to translation, but the muscles being used are very different.


Combination of motions:

As stated earlier, the fastest speeds are achieved by combining the motions. I highly recommend combining Rotation and Oscillation. When combining rotation and oscillation, it seems to naturally minimize the movement of your pick, making it as small as possible. A key to speed is economy of movement, and rotation and oscillation help minimize the motion in your wrist. Combining rotation and oscillation is great because the motion of your wrist doing rotation naturally moves with the arc of the strings, and makes for faster string-crossing and string-skipped licks. The whole natural feel of rotation and oscillation makes those 15nps licks not feel so impossible anymore!

Elbow movement:

The elbow IMO can be made the most use out of when used for crossing strings. When used in combination with a wrist moving in a rotary manner, you can quickly jump from string to string very easily and smoothly. Since the crossing of strings is typically less frequent and a larger motion, you don't run much of a risk of injuring your self with tense spasmodic movements and it's quite easy to keep tension out of your elbow and shoulder with just a little bit of correct practice.

Shoulder Movement:
Ugh...**** that, the further you move up your arm, the more difficult it gets to stay relaxed and tension free and keeping movements minute. I do not recommend using shoulder movement for much of anything, as IMO you can do the same much more easily with your elbow.
Last edited by Erc at Jun 30, 2006,
#16
Continued....

Anchor or not to anchor...That is the question!!!

One of the most heavily debated subjects among technique junkies and guitar enthusiasts is on whether to or not to anchor. When you anchor, you are applying pressure to the guitar. There are 2 ways to anchor.

1.)Anchoring with pinky to pick guard

2.)Anchoring with hand to bridge/lower string.

Now if I was to promote either one of those, I would promote anchoring with your hand to the lower strings/bridge. When you anchor with your pinky to the pick guard, you have to extend your pinky. Last time I checked NOBODYS hand naturally had their pinky extended. This causes unnecessary tension and results in slowing you down and making things much more difficult.

Anchoring is a crutch, and it only offers one positive aspect. When playing in a live experience, you can jump up and down, spin around, pelvic thrust, shake your ass, take a dump, pretty much anything and not miss a note. Chances are you are not going to be jumping up and down like a dick-head while soloing, which is when you will most likely need speed for more complex lines then chugging death-metal riffs or tremolo picked chord tones or whatever.

Playing Un-anchored is ideal, ESPECIALLY while soloing. When un-anchored you've got a more free range of movement and no added tension from the friction of being anchored or the pressure having to be applied. Tension is the numero uno speed killer, stay as loose as possible at all times, it is impossible to stay as loose as you possibly can while anchored. You only get used to the tension and stop noticing it. Here is a pretty little analogy...

Pretend your room is empty of stuff. Anchoring is much like trying to reach your max running speed inside your room. You have very little room to gain speed and before 3 or 4 steps you've got to make a turn and you lose speed on that and so on and so forth. You don't have freedom or room to move.

Pretend you're in a wide open valley or plain, or an open gym. You can obviously have room to reach your max speed, room to turn with the least amount of speed lost etc. You will never reach your max speed while playing anchored. There is too much added un-necessary movement and your hand is locked in. Not as large (or free) range of motion available to you.

THE ARM AS AN ANCHOR.

Many many guitarists anchor their upper forearm to the guitar (part closest to the elbow). While this is a hampering affect, its not nearly as hampering as a wrist/hand anchor. If you can free your arm entirely from the guitar without shoulder or upper-arm tension/pains, then do so. On some guitars its impossible to actually un-root the upper-arm (on most it can be done). But do not get in a fit over this as it not nearly as important as un-anchoring your wrist.


Alt picking or Eco-picking:

For those who do not know, alternate picking is a strict up-stroke and down-stroke pattern played on fast licks (or any lick really, but is a must when trying to reach hyper-speed). Economy Picking (or Eco-picking for short) is taking the shortest path to the string. Much like sweeping, if you are playing a 3-note per string pattern like this you'd be playing it like so if you were doing it eco style.

^ - upstroke

v - downstroke


 
           V  ^  V  V  ^  V
       e|-------------------
       B|-------------------
       G|-------------------
       D|-----------12-14-15
       A|--12-14-15---------
       E|------------------- 



Alternate picking has a definite feel of consistency and forces you to make larger movements at times when crossing strings so you have an increased feel of freedom. With eco-picking long, complex licks at hyper-speed, you end up inside picking (picking inside the strings) almost the whole time and it feels like you are locked into the tiny space in between strings. Alt picking forces you to outside pick more and even out the amount of inside and outside-picking so you do not feel trapped. I recommend using alt-picking, but I am also an avid eco-picker. I highly recommend you learn how to both eco-pick and alt-pick.


Minor Details and Notes about Picking:

There are a few minor details that do not deserve their own mini-section, but need to be taken account for and not forgotten. You must always remember that the strings are in an arc, that the neck radius isn't actually really flat (Unless you're playing a Shawn Lane sig). Treat the strings like they are (in an arc) and you'll be richly rewarded with effortless string-skipping and crossing. Pick angle is another thing to account for. The more perpendicular the pick is to the strings, the harder the attack will be and sharper the sound. The more angled the pick is, the easier it is to get through the string, but it will sound more dull. Experiment and find a comfortable medium, or if you don't like that, go either way, hell it?s your tone. (Back-tracking to the beginning about how to hold the pick, holding the pick with the pads of your index and thumb makes it easier to apply pressure in different parts of the pick, making it very easy to angle the pick in different directions and changing the sound according to how you want it to be.)

That?s about it, good luck and happy picking!!


Thoughts or opinions on the revised version? New parts added are "Knock-Back", "The Arm as an Anchor" and more description of the motions of "Translation, Rotation and Oscillation"
Last edited by Erc at Jun 30, 2006,
#17
I congratulate you for a very useful article but writing it twice doesnt make it twice as good.

Quote by Robbie n strat
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#18
Were you dropped on your head as a kid?

EDIT--> There I highlighted the big important message at the bottom. Dumbass. I also went and bolded all the edited and new sections.
Last edited by Erc at Jun 30, 2006,
#19
Christ mate, dont completely go mad at me. I was just saying that you need not write it out again, just edit your original, saves time

Oh yeah, and I think I get the oscillation movement, its basically just picking with your wrist staying still and at 45, however I dont understand how you manage 90......

Quote by Robbie n strat
In the changing rooms we'd all jump around so our dicks and balls bounced all over the place, which we found hilarious.



Little children should be felt, not heard.
#21
Christ mate, dont completely go mad at me. I was just saying that you need not write it out again, just edit your original, saves time


I wrote the article in Word. Copy and Paste rules.

Couldn't edit the original because the 10000 character limit.

Oh yeah, and I think I get the oscillation movement, its basically just picking with your wrist staying still and at 45, however I dont understand how you manage 90......


It requires a lot of stretching of the index and thumb at a 90degree angle, and I wouldn't recommend doing it at a 90 degree angle, nor taking EVERYTHING as gospel truth from the tuck and patti article. (such things as he tells you to anchor on the bridge to do the oscillation picking)

When learning to pick oscillatory style, I recommend starting your hand in this sort of position.



Once you are comfortable with it you can later change it more to a hand position like this (if you so desire.)

The Tuck and Patti article tells you to hold your hand like this.
#23
i'm completely lost on the oscillation...the pictures show the placement of the hand and wrist, but i just don't see how you can translate that into any sort of "knocking" motion (i know it's a bad comparison)...wouldn't this movement bring your pick away from the strings? if so, i thought picking was supposed to involve as little horizontal movement as possible...can somebody please post more pictures or perhaps a video showing an oscillation picker playing a passage slowly (like an instructional clip) i've looked and i can't find anything
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#24
Look at the first picture of shawn. Imagine he was knocking on the strings like you would a door, with that hand position. Thats oscillation. Now, what you want to do is take the motion, the muscles you use for that, and transfer that to picking in general. Or, you could check out the technique thread, where, i swear to god, i've gone over oscillation about 50 times.
#25
yes, i would imagine it's tiring, much like the ongoing argument about anchoring...i've tried convincing, it works sometimes, mostly it doesn't...oh well, i'll look through that thread
Quote by BigFatSandwich
it took you 15 consecutive hours of practice to realize that playing guitar makes you better at playing guitar. congratulations.


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Axe_grinder pwns!!!!



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#26
I would stress the fact that one needs to learn to how to alternate pick very well before learning how to economy pick.
R.I.P. Shawn "Memphis Monster" Lane

Member #8 of the Ibanez RG5xx & up club PM tombo32 to join < 110% credit to t2russo
#27
Being quite new to oscillation picking I think I've begun to grasp the concept. Now to make sure I'm on the right page if not I'm in the totally wrong direction does MAB use this style of picking?
#28
No, he does not. He uses a combination of wrist (translatory) and thumb movement, along with anchoring.

Shawn Lane is a good example of a virtuoso who oscillates.
R.I.P. Shawn "Memphis Monster" Lane

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Last edited by waylay00 at Jul 2, 2006,
#29
Um as far as the whole knock back thing is concerned its impossible to avoid it completely and it is minimised by using the tip of the pick to hit the string, and well also using a thinner pick helps but some people prefer thick picks so ye.

And if you've been doing anything for 30 years plus with similar motion in your wrist then no matter how you do it you will get carpel tunnel to some extent
#30
Quote by waylay00
No he does not. He uses a combination of wrist (tranlatory) and thumb movement with anchoring.


Yes he does. He oscillates. His fingers are anchored, and as they are, they dont move when he oscillates - so it looks like his thumb.

What a terribly inelegant sentance.
#31
Well dudes I'm new to this forum.. I've been searching for info on the oscillation technique for a very long time. I've had some MAJOR dramas with guitar playing, I have been suffering golfer's elbow in my picking elbow (right arm) for about 9months due to overpractice. I think I have been playing in the Translatory technique, and that bloke was right that once you get up to about 12 notes per second, roughly 200 bpm at 16th notes, you do get very tense.

I would LOVE to see some videos of this oscillation technique being utilised.

Edit: I say I'm new but my join date is 4 years back! I haven't used the forum since then I don't think.. so I thought it was worth saying I'm new.
#32
i've been searching through the technique thread for hours and i can't find that vid

scratch that, i found that vid by FP this should help
http://rapidshare.de/files/21411605..._stuff.zip.html
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Last edited by axe_grinder247 at Jul 16, 2006,
#33
Quote by axe_grinder247
i've been searching through the technique thread for hours and i can't find that vid

scratch that, i found that vid by FP this should help
http://rapidshare.de/files/21411605..._stuff.zip.html


That link did not actually work mate . I went and found a couple of vids of Shawn Lane on YouTube.com. If you guys haven't been to that site you should.. just type in Shawn Lane and you'll find stuff. Here's one that I've been looking at in particular.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fOLZ6z959U8&search=shawn%20lane

I don't really notice the 'knocking the door' sort of action, but as was said it's the muscles that are used to knock the door that are used, right? It looks a lot like the technique most ppl use, except he doesn't anchor at all and it looks so difficult!
#38
Quote by Freepower
np, it saves me about a thread and a half of explanation.


Hmmmm was that YOUR video, FP? Your location thingy says you're from Northern Ireland? Or weren't you born there? *confused*
#40
Quote by Freepower
I was born in Germany, lived there a year, lived in Switzerland for 6 or 7 years after that, and since that i've been in Northern Ireland. Why'dja ask?


Ahh you just sound American that's all.. you don't sound Irish at allll haha. But it's fine. My own girlfriend is Russian and SHE sounds American (with the slight Russian accent) and has never been to America. I think it's something to do with the teachers who teach English overseas, and television - it's mostly American.

ANYWAYS! Back to Oscillation Picking. I will post up a video later on with my current picking technique, see if ya reckon it's translation or not (if you're bothered to).
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