#1
Can anyone here part their knowledge on why one might need slanted frets? This is a picture of Rusty Cooley with his custom made 8 string shred machine. Notice the higher frets.



And is it just me or does he have an emo look on his face? :P
Ibanez Prestige RG1570 ftw!
#4
is that one higher and on lower string or two lower?with one higher, it is very prone to breakage at standard scale, so it'd have a shorter scale than the others, and the B would probably be loose, so a longer scale would be preferred.

Jean Baudin does something like this.
#5
Different scale lengths for the different strings = more equal forces on each string = better tone apparently

and with multiple string guitars like that it helps if the low ones are on a larger scale length so they don't got all flappy (and the opposite on the high strings) and together with different scale lenghts on each string you have to compensate with the fanned fret stuff
#6
They're called 'Fanned Frets'.

Its pretty much just for better sounds, means you can have different scale lengths for different strings. Longer scale lenght = better bottom end, so the low strings have a longer scale, and vice versa for the high strings.
#7
It can also make difficult voicings to play on a normal guitar much easier.
#9
Quote by rockon1824
Some of those higher frets would be impossible to play, they're smaller than a finger.


err, 24 frets, just like on any guitar.

The end of the fretboard on my regular Fender scale guitar is allready a bit like that around the 21st fret
#11
that is a 8 string guitar, looks like from conklin
tuned BEADGBEA (in standard)
i know its been answered, but


the frets are fanned because the guitar isnt of one scale length.
the B string is longer (cant tell you, probably a bari scale) and the high A is of a smaller scale. it is used to keep the strings of a uniform tension. ERB's above 7 strings are quite commonly fanned for the same reason.