#1
This is a Kingston, also known as Teisco, and other names all made by the Japanese company Teisco. They were making instruments between 1949 and 1967. Not much is know about them though.

Everything is all original. Neck is long grain maple with a brazillian rosewood fretboard. It has one big toster pick-up under the shield. Tuners, shields, pickup, bridge, pots, everything is all original. Body is one piece. Excellent condition given it's age.

I'm thinking of putting a Fender J pickup in there.

Check out the pics.


http://www.freewebs.com/flashbass/

Thanks!
Last edited by larryflash at Jun 28, 2006,
#4
Quote by Spade1
wow nice bass, Kinda looks like a fender P bass,



well the japanese took those american guitars and tried to replicate them as best as they could
#5
Ask a mod to move this to the Bass forum. You're not going to get much valuable help here.
Hi, I'm Peter
#6
brazillian rosewood brazillian rosewood = killer sound!
Gear:
Black Jackson Dinky 2
Peavey Envoy 110
and that's it.
#7
Quote by larryflash
well the japanese took those american guitars and tried to replicate them as best as they could


Up to a point.

It's the same like they did with cars - there was a point when Japanese production went from meticulous copies of western engeneiring, to fiendish designs that Europe and the US could only watch as they sold in thousands for tiny prices.

If you search around, you can find models that were part of the transistion period, so it is possible to get clever eastern ingenuity coupled with classic western designs.
Or all the old failings of eastern manufacture, alongside the bizarrie prototypes of 20th century Japanese tecnology.
Grant me the power to change what I can.
Grant me the serenity to accept what I cannot change.
Grant me the wisdom to tell the difference.

"I had a hat once.
It was a very fine hat..."
#8
Quote by Jakkle
Up to a point.

It's the same like they did with cars - there was a point when Japanese production went from meticulous copies of western engeneiring, to fiendish designs that Europe and the US could only watch as they sold in thousands for tiny prices.

If you search around, you can find models that were part of the transistion period, so it is possible to get clever eastern ingenuity coupled with classic western designs.
Or all the old failings of eastern manufacture, alongside the bizarrie prototypes of 20th century Japanese tecnology.


lol wow.