#1
So I walked into the room the other day and my dad was sitting in front of the TV with the guitar and watching some show and whenever there was music in the show, after a couple tries he could play it back perfectly so I was all like woah how do you do that and he said that he hears the chords.

Then, at piano lessons, I forget what we were talking about but he told me to try to learn a song by ear by the recording, cause you'll get better at it and transcriptions can be wrong.

Since then I've been trying to learn songs by ear, but I'm not very good at finding it on the fret board...and I can't imagine ever learning a solo by ear note for note... I've gotten the enter sandman entro, the heartbreaker riff, and just the chords for fall to pieces by velvet revolver, trying not to cheat by looking up tabs. Then, I thought I had the Black Dog Riff but it was at the wrong place on the fretboard when I checked it with tabs...


(sorry this was so long_
Does anyone have any tips for learning things by ear, or any easy songs you can pickout the notes to?
Quote by Roc8995
Thin necks make you play faster because guitars with thin necks sound thin and bad, and you play fast to distract people from the bad tone.
#2
figuring out power chords are pretty easy and good to start on
Originally posted by tylerishot
There is no reason that taking advantage of a drunk chick is acceptable. You can, however, beat them up, and tell them they fell down the stairs.
#3
practice practice practice, try transcibing the sweet home alabama intro for practice
MY gear
Vintage v100 les paul.
POS Ion strat
Vox ad50vt
15 watt practice amp
Ibanez rg570
#4
As unhelpful as this sounds the only real good way of improving your ear playing is to do it lots. Practice, practice practice, it's a popular saying for a reason. I would suggest you start learning your intervals, and how to pick out intervals from a root note. EX. play a c, then play a f above that. That sound is a perfect fifth and all the other intervals are different etc.. but learning those helps you figure out where to go on a riff that you only have the starting note too. Dont worry about where on the fretboard either the tabs you'l find are how people think it would be easiest to be played, theoretically you could hit all the same notes as the have just in a different place. Keep up the practise, hope this helps.

mcappleboy-
#5
Quote by mcappleboy
As unhelpful as this sounds the only real good way of improving your ear playing is to do it lots. Practice, practice practice, it's a popular saying for a reason. I would suggest you start learning your intervals, and how to pick out intervals from a root note. EX. play a c, then play a f above that. That sound is a perfect fifth and all the other intervals are different etc.. but learning those helps you figure out where to go on a riff that you only have the starting note too. Dont worry about where on the fretboard either the tabs you'l find are how people think it would be easiest to be played, theoretically you could hit all the same notes as the have just in a different place. Keep up the practise, hope this helps.

mcappleboy-



yes it helps but don't you mean G?
Quote by Roc8995
Thin necks make you play faster because guitars with thin necks sound thin and bad, and you play fast to distract people from the bad tone.
#6
I know the frustration you are talking about. Even worse, I am a bassist in a band with a few very experienced and competent musicians that can play anything they've heard and anything they hear right on the spot without rehearsing or even hestitating a fraction of a measure. I'm practising like hell to acquire the skill these people, and obviously your father have, but still every gig they succeed in making a fool out of me by playing unrehearsed songs and leaving me guessing in vain.

Here is what I do to get over this repeating embarresment:
a) Play along with music. Fish for the root notes and only switch to chords if you've catched one.
b) Train your ears for intervals by playing familiar tunes. Old school nursery rhymes and basic folk tunes are very suitable for this.
c) Learn some theory about modes, scales, chord sequences and chord building. Music doesn't drop out of the blue but follows a limited set of rules.
d) Learn to recognize these modes, scales and chords. This is easyer than you might think, for each mode or chord has an unmistakable ring to it. Sure you'll already be able to distinguish majors from minors and sevenths.
e) Think in sounds rather than in chord names, dots on sheets or even positions on the fretboard. This will free your brains of a lot of unnecessary processing work like recognizing a note, translating this to a letter of the alpabet, finding the position with that name on the fretboard and finally playing that note. Instead you should know a sound and immediately without thinking move your fingers to play it.
f) Post tabs. First it will take hours to figure out a familiar song, but eventually you'll get faster and in the end you can do it in real time. If not, your posts will at least help other suckers that can't play a song without reading from sheet.