#1
Can someone give me a link to a lesson about chord progressions or help me in this thread? I know I III IV is the basic one.. what else is there?
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#2
I might be able to help u im not sure it depends wot u want to know about them
maybe so...maybe so young one.

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#3
Quote by The Iron Man
Can someone give me a link to a lesson about chord progressions or help me in this thread? I know I III IV is the basic one.. what else is there?
I'd start by recommending you go ahead and finish the progression you started in your question...I iii IV V I. From here you could go in many directions. If you're primarily a rocker, any variation on I IV V works. Here are just three examples...
* I IV V I
* I V IV V I
* I IV I V I

If you wanted to throw a little variety into the mix, go to vi from time to time instead of always going to I, as in...

* I IV I V vi

This, by the way, is one example of what's called the deceptive cadence.

Moving on to jazzier progressions, the heart of this genre is ii V I.

Once that's under your fingers, you can stretch out with the amazingly versatile iii vi ii V I.

For a more sensitive pop feel, you can't go wrong with I ii iii IV I. Bear in mind that this progression has launched a thousand tunes and can lead virtually anywhere. But this little progression is a terrific seed.

If music of the '50s floats your boat, the one absolutely indispensable progression is I vi IV V I.

Its very close relative is I vi ii V I.

We have not even begun to scratch the surface of this topic. Other folks are no doubt going to post some great foundational progressions, too. But these seem to me to be among the most crucial and perhaps there's enough here to whet your appetite for deeper studies. And please, do yourself a favor and learn these simpler progressions in all 12 keys. You'll thank yourself a thousand times.
All things are difficult before they are easy.
- Dr. Thomas Fuller (British physician, 1654-1734)
Quote by Freepower
For everything you need to know - gpb0216.
#4
Quote by gpb0216
I'd start by recommending you go ahead and finish the progression you started in your question...I iii IV V I. From here you could go in many directions. If you're primarily a rocker, any variation on I IV V works. Here are just three examples...
* I IV V I
* I V IV V I
* I IV I V I

If you wanted to throw a little variety into the mix, go to vi from time to time instead of always going to I, as in...

* I IV I V vi

This, by the way, is one example of what's called the deceptive cadence.

Moving on to jazzier progressions, the heart of this genre is ii V I.

Once that's under your fingers, you can stretch out with the amazingly versatile iii vi ii V I.

For a more sensitive pop feel, you can't go wrong with I ii iii IV I. Bear in mind that this progression has launched a thousand tunes and can lead virtually anywhere. But this little progression is a terrific seed.

If music of the '50s floats your boat, the one absolutely indispensable progression is I vi IV V I.

Its very close relative is I vi ii V I.

We have not even begun to scratch the surface of this topic. Other folks are no doubt going to post some great foundational progressions, too. But these seem to me to be among the most crucial and perhaps there's enough here to whet your appetite for deeper studies. And please, do yourself a favor and learn these simpler progressions in all 12 keys. You'll thank yourself a thousand times.

Thanks. Is it alright to just put random chords together and solo over that? I guess it just doesnt sound as great as when you have specific chord progressions?
Minister of Zeppelinism, PM TheHeartBreaker to join
#6 member of the oasis fan club
Cardinal of The 1st Church of Frusciantism
'89 fender american strat
Vox ad15vt
Peavey raptor plus EXP(bridge: alnico 2 pro)
yamaha f-310p
#5
Quote by The Iron Man
Thanks. Is it alright to just put random chords together and solo over that?
Of course it's alright. There's no telling what you might come up with.
I guess it just doesn't sound as great as when you have specific chord progressions?
Your question presents me with an opportunity to encourage everybody reading this thread to learn to read and analyze standard notation. The masters (Mozart, Sibelius, Brahms, Beethoven, Bach, etc. - the list goes on and on) created chord progressions that are simply mind-boggling. The great tragedy is that the vast majority of these progressions will simply never appear in tab. To get to these mother lodes of chord progression goodness you're simply going to have to drill the mine yourself, and your only drilling tool right now is standard notation.

Standard Notation is simply the ambitious guitarist's best friend, in my opinion.
All things are difficult before they are easy.
- Dr. Thomas Fuller (British physician, 1654-1734)
Quote by Freepower
For everything you need to know - gpb0216.