#1
A few of my friends have good ears for picking up notes and putting notes together even though they aren't very good at playing the guitar. I would consider myself better than average on the guitar yet I taught myself from reading tablature because my ear for music is not very good at all. Is there any way to train your ear for music or is it just something some people are better at than others?
#2
Some people are better than others, but everyone can do it if they focus. Try to tab out som songs.


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#3
yeah, its possible for everyone, start out with an easy song, something with a lot of powerchords, i started out tabbing out queens of the stone age stuff, their older stuff, then slowly moved on to stuff that has more notey stuff
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#4
To start off use simple power chord songs, from there move to complicated songs. The way to work on harder songs would be to play each part over adn over, figure out the main note (root note), adn then go from there by figuring out teh chord parts, minor/majior, ect.
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#5
As I played the guitar more my ear for music developed naturally. You just have to give it some time.
#9
have someone else sit behind you and have them hit random notes, and you try to copy them without looking. eventually move on to them making one note followed quickly by another, and then getting more advanced from there.
#10
Quote by mishra
have someone else sit behind you and have them hit random notes, and you try to copy them without looking. eventually move on to them making one note followed quickly by another, and then getting more advanced from there.
You have to be given a note beforehand for that to be possible without perfect pitch.
#11
what? they play a note, and you just try and replicate it without looking at them. of course if you are playing guitar for a little bit, you can sort of guess in what general area the note is coming from.
#12
Quote by mishra
what? they play a note, and you just try and replicate it without looking at them. of course if you are playing guitar for a little bit, you can sort of guess in what general area the note is coming from.
Being able to recognize a note with no reference note is called perfect pitch.

Unless you mean randomly playing notes on your guitar until you find the note they played. That would not help train your ear.
#13
no you couldnt get it first time, but you could ballpark it. it would help in the long run, hearing the notes and being able to locate where it is is good, having some program to do it wont really help you, the only way you can learnnn is trial end eerror.
#14
Quote by mishra
no you couldnt get it first time, but you could ballpark it. it would help in the long run, hearing the notes and being able to locate where it is is good, having some program to do it wont really help you, the only way you can learnnn is trial end eerror.
The best you could do without perfect pitch is recognizing intervals. This means that I play an A and tell you that it's an A, then I play a C and you tell me that it's a C. It does not mean that I play a C and you tell me that it's a C. That would require perfect pitch.
#15
i couldnt tell a or c anyway, i was talking about learning things strictly by ear, playing from records if you will. if you play something i wouldnt be able to say what note it is, but i could probably replicate it.
#17
One way that you can kind of train your ear is to listen to a song, know a certain pitch in the song, and never forget it. Then, once you have that pitch in your head, you can find any other note easily by using the intervallic relationships. That's how I do it.
#19
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#20
it has been debated, but i think that everyone is born with perfect pitch, it's just that you have to naturally LISTEN to the notes without straining your ear and you'll realize that each note has it's own unique texture...a bit like hearing different colors, you just have to learn how to listen...it's not memorizing at all, just listening
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#21
I used good-ear, it does the job. I also made a program similar to thing for college. I will eventually put it up and post a link but not in time to help you so good-ear is a good site.

If you can tell if a note is flat or sharp then you aren't that bad off. It takes practice to train your ear, your friends are just freaks...
Quote by jimtaka
i'd say your guitar is out of tune, or you are accidentally muting strings that you aren't trying to, or your right hand isn't strumming at the same time that your left hand is fretting, or you could be reading the tab upside down...
#23
Quote by bangoodcharlote
The best you could do without perfect pitch is recognizing intervals. This means that I play an A and tell you that it's an A, then I play a C and you tell me that it's a C. It does not mean that I play a C and you tell me that it's a C. That would require perfect pitch.


The trying is what matters - in his example, if you just said "Oh, i dont have perfect pitch, i wont bother...", then you won't learn anything. However, if you arsed yourself to imitate the melody as close to the original pitch as you can hear, then you'll gain a feel for which notes are where, as well as melodies...