#1
Hey guys...

So I just joined a band recently and have only bee nto my audition after I left for a 2 week service trip. Over this period the band practiced heavily on one song and is near ready to record it. As prices go by the hour I will need to be near perfect in my playing of the first song.

I have practiced to the point that I can play it relatively well but I was wondering how to make it great... what do you guys do to get it perfect time and time again?

Is there a method to practicing? When I come back this week I need to have the songs at the level they do and I'm thinking this will be tough dur to my absense.

I play Guitar and share the solos so we are both basically co-lead players. I may need to sing vocals as well in the background because of my pretty good voice but have never played and sang at the same time before.

Any tips for practicing to perfection OR singing and playing simultaneously are much obliged!

Thanks,
-JWiz
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#2
Practice as much as possible. I think that's all we can advise you to do, mate.

Sorry =\
#4
well when you record, the vocals and guitar will probably be recorded separately, so no worries about playing and singing at the same time, but still go ahead and practice that for the live show
also make sure and use a metronome to get it in perfect time
and jsut keep practicing
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#5
Quote by IronBeast
well when you record, the vocals and guitar will probably be recorded separately, so no worries about playing and singing at the same time, but still go ahead and practice that for the live show
also make sure and use a metronome to get it in perfect time
and jsut keep practicing


never know, they could go St.Anger on him and do it all at the same time.
#7
You just need to know the song inside and out by practicing. That's all you can do. You don't necessarily need a metronome, just play the song over and over until it's engrained in your head.

Are you recording at a professional studio?
Looking for my India/Django.
#8
^ Probably, if they're paying by the hour, and not a set fee.

I do recommend a metronome, as I just did here. Especially the bit about getting it over tempo. If you want to reduce your recording costs, don't worry about playing it perfectly the first time, you never will, and a lot of people get red-light syndrome and can't record for **** the first few times.

What you want to do is spend part of the next day figuring out where you can logically break the thing up, into sections as small as possible so that when, not if, you screw up, you know how little you can start ahead of your mistake, and play into it sounding like you're flowing into it in one steady take. That way when, not if, you screw up, you can go patch those mistakes as quickly as possible, with as little cutting and editing as you need.

Do that for the entire thing, and also figure out what sections are repeated exactly -- you only need to take one recording of a repeat, and you can just patch it where the repeat is (if you've got a section that's just a repeating fill, or something along those lines, you'll want an odd number of clean repeats recorded, normally 3 or 5, because you'll play it slightly differently, accents and what not, and you obscure where the actual take begins and ends).
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#9
Maybe try recording at home using a click track, or at least recording along to drums. The first times I tried doing this it exposed how badly out of time I was.
#10
Patch repeats? That sounds like cheating to me...

You can't forget that recoridng in a studio needs to be a performance just as much as when you are on stage. Granted, you can break things up and record different people at different times, but that doesn't mean it's not a performance. The BEST recordings are one where the band recorded as much together as possible. As far as patching repeats goes, if you can't play a repeating part well enough over and over, you shouldn't be playing that song. Patching in one take and repeating it just covers up how bad you might be, but actually playing through it shows a little of how good you might be.
Looking for my India/Django.
#11
^ There's a balance between your ego and your checkbook. There's no crime in patching something that you know you can play, wasting your time getting it right is wasting money, and screwing around if you've never recorded before will cost money.

Up to him, but he's got a week to prep, and it's a business decision. Personally I wouldn't **** around. But that's just me.
Quote by les_kris
Corwinoid is God
I'm not even God-like... I've officially usurped the Almighty's throne.
Click here to worship me.

Member #3 of the Corwinoid Fan Club
#12
Hm well yeah if it's your first recording experience then it might be worth it... but I sort of felt that it was implied in that "patch the repeats" comment I replied to that he couldn't play the parts... but I guess if you know you can anyways, then patching ain't too bad.

But I'm still anti-patching.
Looking for my India/Django.