#1
Hello,
I've been playing for about 2 years, got alot of things behind my belt, my guitar teacher has show me somethings like pentatonic scales, and the ionian, dorian, phrygian, lydian, mixolydian, aeolian and locrian forms for the key of Gmaj... but i go for lessons for 1 hour every week so its going kinda slow...

I wanted to learn how to play in different keys, be able to make solos, be able to connect chords with scales, harmonize two guitars and all that fun stuff... but where do I start ? I've googled "guitar music theory" and other similar searches, and looked at articles on the site, but alot of them seem confusing... articles on Intervals, Construction of Scales/Chords, Keys, etc... but many I dont understand.. Am I skipping over something ?

Basicly im asking on advice on how to approach music theory and how to begin learning it... any advice would be greatly appreciated, if you know any books/videos that help out and are easy to understand let me know, any good websites ? or articles on this site ?

Thank You
#4
^ thanks for the link, i'll look into it

Quote by rps13fanatic
have you studied the circle of 5ths?


I know of it and kind of how it works but I have not studied it...
#5
I don't get this 'music theory'. o well to hell with it im just gonna play whatever I feel like
#6
Definitely study the circle of fifths first.
That will teach you about keys and which notes to use them in.
Honestly, if you're trying to make a solo, start out in the key you're most comfortable with, whether that be C major, A Minor (the relative minor to C Major), G major, be minor (The relative minor to G major). Just write a progression in that key, such as, if you're in G major, this one.

D--5--12--9--4
A--3--10--7--4 (F sharp powerchord)
E--3--10--7--2

And jack around with your modes over them and see what you can make sound good.
And just a quick note on harmonizing... Personally I find that the best way to harmonize is to use a third interval. So what you would do (assume your in C Major) is if one guitar is running like a sequence that goes E G F A G E E F E on a lead part fairly quick, then if you want to find a third above one of those notes (let's use the first one, E) here's how you do it.

First write out all the notes in the scale.

C (Root) From here
D (2nd)
E (3rd) to here is a third.
F (4th)
G (5th)
A (6th)
B (7th)
C (Octave)

Ok now a third is two notes in the scale above whichever note your starting with. So... starting with a C, your third in the key of C Major would be an E. If you want to find a third away from E, it'd be G. Make sense? That works well when harmonizing.

So back to the lick.
If guitar one is playing this:
E G F A G E E F E
or
e--12--15--13--17--12--12h13p12

Then guitar two would be playing this, when using thirds for harmony:

G B A C B G G A G
or
e--15--19--17--20--19--15--15h17p15

You're definitely not gonna want to use that sequence anywhere because it sounds terrible, but there's the basic idea on it.
#9
musictheory.net

not a bad place to visit either
Run!
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#11
Just keep taking your lessons. Ask your teacher about rudimentary theory books, they have many excercises and what not that will help a lot.
#12
Quote by Silly_willy_Sugar_pants
Notes, intervals and the major scales are the place to start.

-Silly_willy_Sugar_pants


I know the notes and the major scale and how its formed, only thing thats has me really confused at this point is intervals
#13
Do, a dear, a female dear
Ra, drop of golden sun...

No joke. Learn both "fixed" and "movable". Don't push hard, everything will fall into place.