#1
So i've been trying to learn the guitar from this site. Now i'm going through learning scales. the site has different patterns for the different scales , major, minor , pentatonic etc. Now i understand that the first note that i hit on the top string is the root , and the name of the scale. But there are other root notes in these patterns. So basically i'm asking with thses patterns do the fingerings change in diffrent places on the neck?
the site i was using is www.cyberfret.com
so if you can understand this could you please give advice
#2
Other root notes? Shouldn't they simply be different octaves of the same note?
#4
Quote by Johnljones7443
http://www.cyberfret.com/scales/minor-pentatonic/index.php

^That shows you how the Minor Pentatonic positions change as you move along the neck.


I still don't get it( yes im probably quite stupid and acknowledge this).My question is probably more like: The example is a g minor pentatonic scale , how do you play one that is an a for example, is it playin it at the a note on the sixth string , or changing where the root notes(the two or three that have the red ovals) are in the pattern.(all of them.
And what about the other scales, i cant really find fingerings for diffrent places on the neck?

?????????????
#5
Quote by necrophobic_665
I still don't get it( yes im probably quite stupid and acknowledge this).My question is probably more like: The example is a g minor pentatonic scale , how do you play one that is an a for example


Move everything up two frets. As long as you refrain from playing open strings, you can move scales in much the same way that you would move, say, a barre chord.
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#6
^ Yes.

When changing to a different key, but using the same scale (IE, G minor to A minor, or F major to C major) you move every note the same amount of frets. If you didn't, it wouldn't be that scale anymore.
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#7
Quote by necrophobic_665
I still don't get it( yes im probably quite stupid and acknowledge this).My question is probably more like: The example is a g minor pentatonic scale , how do you play one that is an a for example, is it playin it at the a note on the sixth string , or changing where the root notes(the two or three that have the red ovals) are in the pattern.(all of them.
And what about the other scales, i cant really find fingerings for diffrent places on the neck?


If you want to play the Am pentatonic, you're going to move the ENTIRE scale up two frets. Scales are just a pattern of notes that you play. The pattern for a minor pentatonic scale with the root on the 6th string is:

1,4,1,3,1,3,1,3,1,4,1,4

That's the fingering pattern. So, you'd play a Gm pentatonic like this:


E--------------------------(3)-6-3------------------------------|
B----------------------3-6---------6-3-------------------|------|
G-----------------3-5------------------5-3----------------------|
D-----------3-(5)--------------------------(5)-3------------------|
A-------3-5---------------------------------------5-3-------------|
E-(3)-6-----------------------------------------------6-(3)---------|

Root notes in brackets
G=Root notes


The way you play that with your fingers is by playing the 3 on the E string, with your first finger. The 6 on the E string you play with your fourth finger. The 3 on the A string you play with your first finger. The 5 on the A string you play with your finger. You get it, right? The "1st finger,4th finger,1st finger,3rd finger,1st finger,3rd finger,1st finger,3rd finger,1st finger,4th finger,1st finger,4th finger" fingering pattern is the universal Minor Pentatonic Scale (with the root on the 6th string).

You can move this finger pattern all over the neck. Well, the 6th string. You can play that fingering pattern starting on any fret on the 6th string.

So, if you want to move the Gm pentatonic scale to become an Am pentatonic scale, which is what you requested, you're just going to move the same scale fingering pattern up two frets. Where's the A note on the 6th string? That's right, it's on the 5th fret. So, how are we going to play the scale?


E--------------------------(5)-8-5------------------------------|
B----------------------5-8---------8-5-------------------|------|
G-----------------5-7------------------7-5----------------------|
D-----------5-(7)--------------------------(7)-5------------------|
A-------5-7---------------------------------------7-5-------------|
E-(5)-8-----------------------------------------------8-(5)---------|

Root notes in brackets
A=Root notes


See the same finger pattern? You're going to play the 5th fret on the E string with your 1st finger. The 8th fret on the E string you're going to play with your 4th finger. The 5th fret on the A string you're going to play with your first finger...you see it now?

The 1st, 4th, 1st, 3rd, 1st, 3rd, 1st, 3rd, 1st, 4th, 1st, 4th finger pattern is universal. You can move it all up and down the neck, and where ever you put your first finger the E string and begin playing it, is the name of the Minor Pentatonic scale.

Now, your question about roots is pretty easy to explain. See the tabs I wrote out for you? The bracketed notes are the roots. In the Gm pentatonic scale, the roots are Gs. The first one is the main root. The next one is G an octave higher, and the next and final root (the one on the high E string) is G up two octaves. You can play the scale starting on any one of these roots. The fingering pattern will remain the same, it's just that your starting on a different place in the pattern.

I hope this helps. It took forever to type! If you need anymore help, you can PM me. I'll be happy to help.

Oh, and you're not stupid. You're just learning. Once you master this you'll feel great.