#1
ok so i suck anyone know good ways to practice and any ways to get better
any advice?
i really need it
#2
Uhh... Just keep practicing. Maybe learn some scales or picking exercises. There is no easy overnight way to get good.
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#3
just tackle one part at a time practice some songs scales, picking excersies and you'll get better in no time
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#4
lock yourself in your basement and practice 8 hours a day. practice scales and picking exercises. If you have any hint of a social life your not practicing enough.

ok ignore the last sentence
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#7
He's right. If you want to get good, it's gonna be long and hard. I must have practiced an hour a night the first year I picked up my guitar. So ultimately, the amount of time you spend with your hands on the guitar is all that matters.

Nevertheless, there are ways to see improvements faster, and so I'll tell you some of the things I did that gave me an edge over my friends, some who even had much more experience than me.

1) Really hammer away at the technique. Technique makes learning everything easier. Sure you know how to use that diminished flat whatever the **** chord, but if you can't play it how you want it, it's no use to you. So alternate pick, sweep pick, learn all the different ways of expression(bending, vibrato, harmonics, etc.), and try and minimize all movement to make yourself as efficient as possible.

2) Use a goddamned metronome. They work, trust me.

3) Listen to alot of different music. Find what's best, what's instrumentally challenging, and what you love. Play those. To hell with the rest. If you're not liking it, you won't practice it. But if it's easy, you're not gonna get much out of it. So find what you like out of the greats, and play that.

4) Learn your scales, modes, arpeggios, theory, etc. I learned my major scale and modes my third year playing, and it's like I jumped from being one of the worst guitarists at my high school to one of the best. Knowing how the scales worked allowed me to listen and play along with other people, even if I had never heard what they were playing before. I could start improvising, and writing my own material that didn't sound like complete trash. And then, when I wanted to learn really hard stuff, I eventually started to see the scale patterns in everything. Once you see the patterns, it's easier to remember all the notes.

5) After you learn your scales, try this: Turn on the radio to your favorite station, and turn on your guitar. Find the tonic. Play your scale over the song. Break the notes into different combinations. Find what works, what doesn't. Listen for that cool melody or awesome guitar lick and try to rebuild it from the scale. Try to harmonize with the guitarist/vocalist/pianist/etc. I call this excercise the Santana's. Just play like Santana would over a song. It's fun, and it's really good for ear training, improvising, and applied theory in general.

6)Play with other people. Find some friends, learn covers, and jam. You'll learn ****-tons off the people you play with. So make sure you have plenty of musician friends an make sure most to all of them are better than you.

But yeah, most important. Play your damn guitar! Now!
#8
Quote by DSPShadow
He's right. If you want to get good, it's gonna be long and hard. I must have practiced an hour a night the first year I picked up my guitar. So ultimately, the amount of time you spend with your hands on the guitar is all that matters.

Nevertheless, there are ways to see improvements faster, and so I'll tell you some of the things I did that gave me an edge over my friends, some who even had much more experience than me.

1) Really hammer away at the technique. Technique makes learning everything easier. Sure you know how to use that diminished flat whatever the **** chord, but if you can't play it how you want it, it's no use to you. So alternate pick, sweep pick, learn all the different ways of expression(bending, vibrato, harmonics, etc.), and try and minimize all movement to make yourself as efficient as possible.

2) Use a goddamned metronome. They work, trust me.

3) Listen to alot of different music. Find what's best, what's instrumentally challenging, and what you love. Play those. To hell with the rest. If you're not liking it, you won't practice it. But if it's easy, you're not gonna get much out of it. So find what you like out of the greats, and play that.

4) Learn your scales, modes, arpeggios, theory, etc. I learned my major scale and modes my third year playing, and it's like I jumped from being one of the worst guitarists at my high school to one of the best. Knowing how the scales worked allowed me to listen and play along with other people, even if I had never heard what they were playing before. I could start improvising, and writing my own material that didn't sound like complete trash. And then, when I wanted to learn really hard stuff, I eventually started to see the scale patterns in everything. Once you see the patterns, it's easier to remember all the notes.

5) After you learn your scales, try this: Turn on the radio to your favorite station, and turn on your guitar. Find the tonic. Play your scale over the song. Break the notes into different combinations. Find what works, what doesn't. Listen for that cool melody or awesome guitar lick and try to rebuild it from the scale. Try to harmonize with the guitarist/vocalist/pianist/etc. I call this excercise the Santana's. Just play like Santana would over a song. It's fun, and it's really good for ear training, improvising, and applied theory in general.

6)Play with other people. Find some friends, learn covers, and jam. You'll learn ****-tons off the people you play with. So make sure you have plenty of musician friends an make sure most to all of them are better than you.

But yeah, most important. Play your damn guitar! Now!



Damn man, that was really interesting. You should make a lesson or something of that
#9
#10
For picking excercises, check out that John Petrucci video 'Rock Discipline.' His excercises are gold, I probably improve my speed by like 10 or 20 bpm after doing those a few times.