#1
I'm having trouble with doing Artificial Harmonics, i mean i know how to do them but how could you do them comfortabley? My Fingers are too big and get in the way, while trying to do them. Thanks
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#2
Go look at some lessons. Its really hard to explain, like you hit the string with your thumb or something right after you pick it its hard to explain.
#3
PickNgrin had a lesson about harmonics. It was pretty good. You should look at that. It might help.
#4
Check out Solo Goodies by Kristopher Dahl...he explains it well.
#5
Quote by hourglass666
Go look at some lessons. Its really hard to explain, like you hit the string with your thumb or something right after you pick it its hard to explain.



thats pinch harmonics


i find no one knows what artificial harmonics are

place your finger on a fret somewhere, say you had it 2nd fret high e string.

simply fret that note, switch your picking fingers from 1st and thumb to 2nd and thumb and then put your index finger picking hand 12 frets from the fretted note, so in this case put your index finger over the 14th fret like a natural harmonic, keep the 2nd fret fretted and then pluck the string.
#6
^I'm pretty sure artificial harmonics are exactly the same as pinch harmonics? Not 100% sure, but like 97.5%.
#7
Quote by SethMegadefan
^I'm pretty sure artificial harmonics are exactly the same as pinch harmonics? Not 100% sure, but like 97.5%.



no, otherwise we would have, natural and pinch harmonics.
#8
Quote by theusedsk8er
no, otherwise we would have, natural and pinch harmonics.

Okay, okay, I looked it up. According to wikipedia:
Pinch harmonics
A pinch harmonic is a guitar technique in which the nail or thumb slightly catches the string after it is picked, creating a high pitched sound in any position. This technique is most widely used in heavy metal and rock music where heavy distortion ensures that the quiet overtones produced are greatly amplified for a high screaming wail. Pinch harmonics are a form of artificial harmonics.
and
Artificial harmonics
To produce an artificial harmonic, a stringed instrument player (such as a guitarist) holds down a note on the neck with the left hand, thereby shortening the vibrational length of the string, uses a finger to lightly touch a point on the string that is an integer divisor of its vibrational length, and plucks or bows the side of the string that is closer to the bridge. This technique is used to produce harmonic tones that are otherwise inaccessible on the instrument. To guitar players, one variety of this technique is known as a pinch harmonic.
So I was mostly right. I guess you knew the entire thing, but I was, for the most part, right. In fact, about 97.5% right.

#9
Quote by SethMegadefan
Okay, okay, I looked it up. According to wikipedia:
Pinch harmonics
A pinch harmonic is a guitar technique in which the nail or thumb slightly catches the string after it is picked, creating a high pitched sound in any position. This technique is most widely used in heavy metal and rock music where heavy distortion ensures that the quiet overtones produced are greatly amplified for a high screaming wail. Pinch harmonics are a form of artificial harmonics.
and
Artificial harmonics
To produce an artificial harmonic, a stringed instrument player (such as a guitarist) holds down a note on the neck with the left hand, thereby shortening the vibrational length of the string, uses a finger to lightly touch a point on the string that is an integer divisor of its vibrational length, and plucks or bows the side of the string that is closer to the bridge. This technique is used to produce harmonic tones that are otherwise inaccessible on the instrument. To guitar players, one variety of this technique is known as a pinch harmonic.
So I was mostly right. I guess you knew the entire thing, but I was, for the most part, right. In fact, about 97.5% right.




yeah right about all the pinch being a variation.

and for those who dont know. the integer divisor of the vibrational length, is 12 frets away.