#2
same way cheap powerstrips work, they have a line of metal that will "pinch" things stuck in it, holding it just strong enough for a good electrical connection. If you want to really building something, perfboard it at the very least. breadboards are meant for testing out circuits before you build it. And, say, well, see, it's like,

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And see, vertically the holes are not connected, but horizontally they are.
#4
There are little columns of holes that have an electrical connection between them. This means that any wires placed into a connected set of holes with be connected to each other. So to connect two or more wires you just stick each one into the same set of connected holes (one wire per hole). You can use a small gauge wire, but there are special "jumpers" made for breadboards (they are just neatly sized lengths of wire). You'd have to show me an exact model in order for me to give you more specific info. There are various types with different layouts of connected rows/columns.
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#5
Quote by rds0811
There are little columns of holes that have an electrical connection between them. This means that any wires placed into a connected set of holes with be connected to each other. So to connect two or more wires you just stick each one into the same set of connected holes (one wire per hole). You can use a small gauge wire, but there are special "jumpers" made for breadboards (they are just neatly sized lengths of wire). You'd have to show me an exact model in order for me to give you more specific info. There are various types with different layouts of connected rows/columns.


That explains it more. I had an idea of what it was, but wasnt sure because in the store, I couldnt see the bottom part of it. Now I understand, though, how it works. And I have also seen the jumper wires so I understand that all now.
#6
Breadboards are awesome for testing out experimental circuits, since you can swap out everything with no soldering. Also, since there's no soldering the building of the circuit is alot faster (not all the time, complicated circuits for ex would actually take longer).

The only problems with breadboards is that they're not really permanent (unless you use something like a hot glue gun). Also, there's a problem with very high frequencies. Nothing you'll have to worry about with guitars (I think it's only applicable to 100+ kHz, MHz, etc). But since the connection is basically a pin and socket, it has an inherent capacitance, which affects high frequency signals and would cause glitches.
#9
Quote by pannako


its like perfboard but with the rows connected together, instead of each hole only having a bit of copper around itself


edit: read up
http://geofex.com/Article_Folders/protostyles/proto_styles.htm
the terms used are a bit different though
Last edited by seljer at Jul 5, 2006,