#1
I realized a long time ago that what I always envisioned as THE jazz progression was Imaj9, Vadd9, bVIImaj9, IV...

and I know what is considered the most common jazz progression is ii-V7-I.
But Ive never heard an example of ii-V7-I of someone wants to link me to one.


And I'd still like to learn more about jazz progressions; why each one does what it does. I figure the I-V-bVII-IV (with extensions) works because it basically does this chromatic melody with a note held throughout most of it, but I don't see what makes ii-V7-I jazzy (perhaps because I haven't heard it), and I would still like to know what things I can do to make use of more extended chords, and what are some other good examples of jazz progressions.
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#2
I can't give you an example, but I've always thought of the ii-V7-I as a turnaround rather than a progression. Of course, as with all music, it's also in the phrasing of both the melody and the rhythm. Hope that helps a bit!
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#3
I'll try to help with a ii-V-I example.

If you are looking at a jazz standard, and you see a m7 chord followed by a dom7 chord, your chances are good that the m7 could be a ii and the dom7 could be the V7 in a key. Obviously this isn't 100% true, but try looking at a few jazz standards.

For example, look at the chords in Barney Kessel's version of misty. There are a few ii-V-I's (ex: Cm7-F7alt-Bbmaj7), but even when there aren't ii-V-I's, there are tons of ii-Vs if you look.

I imagine the use of the ii-V has something to do with changing tonal centers and tension through the dom7s, but I haven't studied jazz enough to be able to definitively answer that. Hope my example helped, though.
#4
here is a site that really helped me with jazz playing. it has alot of progressions and the site explains ALOT of the theory stuff behind it.

http://www.jazzguitar.be/
go to jazz chords then jazz progressions
hope this helps
#5
Tune Up by Miles Davis has a fair few ii-V-I's.
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#6
oh wow, upon thinking about it, Imaj9 -> Vadd9 -> bVIImaj9 -> IV is basically the ii->V7->I progression... ii isn't minor is this case, but the idea is still the same. I just finally noticed that. Damn.
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#7
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Tune Up by Miles Davis has a fair few ii-V-I's.


Tune Up does the ii-V-I (the 7s are implied, you can basically add them to any chord when playing jazz) through 3 keys.
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#8
but is my assumption about chromatic melodies correct? Can someone with more jazz experience confirm me or give me a thumbs up or a thumbs down or guide me further?
Quote by casualty01
the RIAA can't shut us down, interpol can't shut us down. the U.S. gov't can't shut us down and CERTAINLY not YOU can shut us down.


BA in Music theory
MusicMan Bongo, SUB -> Orange Terror 1000 stack

Quote by waterproofpie
it's a UtBDan sandwich. Awwww yeah!