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#1
Real Name: Matt Erman

Age: 17

Location: Kettering, Ohio

Favorite Band: Sigur Ros, Elliott Smith, Jon Brion, Dntel, Explosions In The Sky, Modest Mouse. There are tons, seriously.

Most Inspirational Lyricist: Lyrically, the most inspiring lyricist is probably, to me, someone like...Thom Yorke, or maybe Tim Kasher. I love the way Thom, [specifically on Kid A] writes, it's really bleak, but not existant, you have to think about what he really means, and what you think is something that part of your character. Each person draws specific emotions out of each song, and that's because of character flaws that make everyone so special. I really appreciate that. Tim Kasher, is just an amazing story-teller. What inspires me the most are bands like, Sigur Ros, Explosions In The Sky, Godspeed You! Black Emperors & A Silver Mt. Zion. The fact that they conveye emotion, and a lot without even using words, transcends what I want to be, I put my poetry to how I feel when I listen to their music. I never write to silence.

To be honest, I try not to read, I try not to draw influences from other writers, because then you begin to slowly become that writer and that makes you unoriginal. The reason why most famous poets and writers are incredibly famous is because they had no one to look up too, and if they did, it was a lot harder to become that person. It's harder now, because there is so much, influence out there already that it's really hard to make your own. When I read, it's usually novels, like Dance, Dance, Dance or Kafka On The Beach. They tend to influence what I want as a screenwriter, which is better than influencing my poetry.

Why Do You Write: I write to be read. People look down on that these days, I want people to feel a certain way when they read what I write, otherwise, I'd just write long myspace blog entrys on how I feel about certain events. There's a certain amount of showmanship when I write my poetry, I like to flaunt my emotions, so you know, you can actually get what I'm feeling when I write it. I'm not saying it's not a way of relieving stress, it is, trust me, the whole process takes me down a notch, it makes me relax and think about things. Without it I'd probably shoot a dog or something. Each event, each major event in my life, is really in my poetry, I can look back at things I've written and not remember writing them and think long and hard enough to tell you why I wrote it. I pride myself that each emotion behind each piece has a backstory. I love to hear how people feel when they read what I write, it makes, well, my ego go up a little [sometimes] and mostly it makes me know!
I'm not alone in feeling so strongly about certain things.

Favourite Writer On UG: Randy, Landon & Old Jude. I know Randy personally, he is a great guy and I wish we could get started on filming or writing or something.

Most Helpful Critiquer: There's a guy roaming around S&L who is incredibly helpful; Paraboetheo, I dunno how long this kid has been around, seems like someone who has banned and made a new account, but yeah, he gave me some of the best advice I've gotten since I came her, twooo years ago.

Your Best Work: This little gem. I think that is the best poetry, I've ever written. Period, I don't know if I will be able to draw my emotions out and to use those words again without thinking about that poem.

Your Most Recent Work and Reason Behind It: My newest. Well, I mainly wrote this as another way of coping with the recent "falling out" I had with a "friend." It evolved during the course of writing it, and turned into a small story, of a nihilistic girl, who finds existentialism and thinks that because of this, she'll be happier, it's about finding hope and not getting the full picture. She tries to find optimism to be happier but in the end it just fails, and she becomes elitist and and stuck-up and thinks because of this philosophy she is better than everyone else, thus damning her to a life lonliness. I might write a short story or something on the subject because I found it one of my more fascinating tales.

Tips For Newer Writers:
-My main shtick is never revise anything, just take what knowledge and feedback you got from that, and write something new. It's the art of progression really. You can't grow as a writer, unless you can detach yourself from the poetry you just wrote two seconds ago. Once it is on paper, it is finish, once it is typed, it is finished, You can revise your thoughts and emotions. You can fix grammatical errors, but I believe that is the art of poetry, to be completely and totally raw, unrevised, pieces of human emotion. When you write like a robot, it shows, but when you revise the emotion out of a piece it shows even more. I find revision, the enemy of a writer that wants to find progression in their writing. In 4 months, anything you revise will be bad anyway, at least for me, I look back at stuff I wrote a year ago to win like, the May WOTM of '05, and it's utterly awful to me. It's poor writing. Revision is pointless.

Final Comments You Wish To Share:
As many of you know, well, that have been reading my writing, my good friend is dying of Ovarian cancer, I've been dealing with that for, awhile now, a lot of my pieces dealt with that this month. I love her dearly, as a friend and, well, as my first kiss and everything that I've ever felt for her. She was a lot of the reason I returned to write this month. I also know another girl, she lives in Texas, who is an amazing friend that I hope to never let go, she means the world to me even though I've never met her in my life. I hate the fact that she's gone and we don't talk for days, I guess that's the great part of a long distance friendship, it's so un-nerving. She deserves something amazing, and I don't think she realizes how amazing she actually is. I want to thank everyone that has read my writing in the past two years, it's been a beautiful period of discovery, tragedy and love. Lots of love and hope, this past year specifically has been the most amazing year of life des!
pite all of the awful things that's happened, a lot of beauty has come out of each as well, which I want to focus more on. I want to thank Becca, for inspiring my last few pieces, I miss her, despite, what I might think of her now, I really do miss her, she was a great friend, a really, great friend. I want to thank Synth [dylan] for virtually sucking my poetic dick this month, it really boosted my ego a ridiculous amount. I want to thank, Laura, Sean, Andrew, Rachel (lauralaurent) [ my best friend.] Uhm, Just everyone I know personally, everyone that sends me private messages on how they want to write like me, or how they love my work, [yeah..I get fan mail.] I love everyone so much and appreciate all the friendships this forum has give me in the past two years, it really has changed my life. <3

Matt Is Art.
Quote by Kensai
Maybe you've heard what the ladies say: "Once you go 77mm you don't go back"
#3
^

Congrats.
They say the old woman's got the wisdom
'Cause she couldn't read the clock anymore
She said "The numbers don't represent the moments"
Says she don't see what all the ticking's for
#4
Quote by pixiesfanyo
more like somthing gay.

lolzzzzzzzszz


pfft, i don't take **** from Pixiesfagyo

<333
www.facebook.com/longlostcomic
#5
no need for the violence men, he got wotm so he is good......even if i didnt vote for u lol. still i read what you consider your best work.....well done, deserved wotm
Songs working on :

Nitelife
#6
Hey, I was like Synth a few months ago and never got a shout-out!

Anyway, congrats, and I realize after reading just the above typing, that THAT is the reason you've won three times.

Congratulations Matt, you're definately an amazing writer. And I agree with just about everything you wrote up...

Edit: And to the above poster(You beat me to posting): What violence?
#8
Uhg, beat me to it again Alice

Anyways, congrats Matt is bitch

But, July is mine...whenever I start to post **** and return the crits I owe. Hopefully starting tomorrow.
Can You Fill In The Blanks?
#9
Congratulations, Your an awesome writer, thats why you had my vote, even though I was up against you

Good Job.
#13
congrats matt
Quote by Kensai
Maybe you've heard what the ladies say: "Once you go 77mm you don't go back"
#15
Cedric can suck my wang. TMV live concerts freakin' suck. If I wanted to hear someone solo for an hour and a half I would use my time machine and go back to the mid seventies and started a jam band.
www.facebook.com/longlostcomic
#17
Congratulations Matt! I found you a bit pretentious as of late, but I can truly see from what is here that you got game and that you're a good guy. Oh and post-rock is the best! GYBE! is a really cool band. I know you're having to live through a difficult time in your life, but you can count on my and all of S&L's support. have courage bro
#18
^ I am pretentious, I think without it, I'd pretty much fail at everything I do.
www.facebook.com/longlostcomic
#19
As Jaco said: "It ain't bragging if you back it up."

It is a purely romantic viewpoint for the writer to be humble and 'an equal'. And if there's one thing that ticks me off, it's unfounded romantic viewpoints.
#20
Congrats sir.
マリ「しあわっせはーあるいってこないだーからあるいってゆっくんだねーん 
いっちにっちいっぽみーかでさんぽ
 さーんぽすすんでにっほさっがるー 
じーんせいはっわんつー!ぱんち・・・


"Success is as dangerous as failure. Hope is as hollow as fear." - from Tao Te Ching

#21
To be honest, I try not to read, I try not to draw influences from other writers, because then you begin to slowly become that writer and that makes you unoriginal. The reason why most famous poets and writers are incredibly famous is because they had no one to look up too, and if they did, it was a lot harder to become that person. It's harder now, because there is so much, influence out there already that it's really hard to make your own


Couldn't agree more with you mate.

Well done son, and all the best to your friend, sorry to hear it, life is a f**king bitch sometimes.

Cheers Matt
#22
Congrats you mountain you! apparently you definitely deserved it, based on the kinda respect people have for you. Hell, when I was lurking S&L I saw that synth guy designated his entire sig to you...
#25
I didn't even know the S+L forum was still running, much less that it still had a few regulars running around .

Congrats, I'm sure you deserve another WotM .
-Landon
#27
Um, I guess. My computer got struck by lightning about a month ago and I just now talked Best Buy into giving me a new one. Does that count as being back ?
-Landon
#28
Idk, does Emma Watson still count as a very hot wizard?
Can You Fill In The Blanks?
#29
Hermione Granger is a witch, if that's what you mean. And yes, she is very hot. I sure wish she'd Apparate...in my pants. Heh heh.
-Landon
#31
I don't agree with yr philosophy on reading other writers at all. I don't believe that deriving your thoughts and style from another writer is something that occurs unconsciously; rather, one can set out to write in the style of another author with a conscious effort. I believe that reading the masters of prose structure, such as Proust, Faulkner, and Coetzee, can help to educate one's mind in the phrasing of its thoughts--this occurs unconsciously, but does not produce any replication of the author you've read; it merely refines your literary brain.
#32
You begin to develope the thoughts and ideas of what you read, which is partially why I don't read much existentialistic poetry or literature like Sartre or nihilistic literature from Nietzche, you begin to develope those same thought patterns and that influences how you write, and you begin emulating that style, those thoughts, that way.

Believe me when I say this, you do, unconsciously or consciously, I've been more than inspired by writers in my past, specifically 2 years ago I was trying so hard to become Cedric Bixlar, in the way he wrote and thought, it was sick.

I don't read because you become what you read, people who love Bukowski will write like Bukowski, people who read & love Frost, will write like Frost and they will because shadows of these writers and won't be able deviate from anything that's been written before.

Reading a book, like Dance, Dance, Dance or Kafka On The Beach is what I do, I read novels because that can't influence my poetry, but it sadly influences my screenplay, which really isn't a bad thing persay.
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#33
I'd say that this is probably more true of more unexperienced authors, but not so much with the more developed writers. Of course, I say this from personal experience. I read sit around reading the metaphysical poets, Kant, T.S. Eliot, and Dante, but I don't find them appearing in actuality - sure, I drop allusions like there's no tomorrow when I get bored, but I'm not going to shoot for terza rima any time soon.

If anything, their ideas will stick to any reader, but the experienced writer will come to understand that style is a thing of individuality. Well, I hope...
#34
Quote by Something_Vague
You begin to develope the thoughts and ideas of what you read, which is partially why I don't read much existentialistic poetry or literature like Sartre or nihilistic literature from Nietzche, you begin to develope those same thought patterns and that influences how you write, and you begin emulating that style, those thoughts, that way.

Believe me when I say this, you do, unconsciously or consciously, I've been more than inspired by writers in my past, specifically 2 years ago I was trying so hard to become Cedric Bixlar, in the way he wrote and thought, it was sick.

I don't read because you become what you read, people who love Bukowski will write like Bukowski, people who read & love Frost, will write like Frost and they will because shadows of these writers and won't be able deviate from anything that's been written before.

Reading a book, like Dance, Dance, Dance or Kafka On The Beach is what I do, I read novels because that can't influence my poetry, but it sadly influences my screenplay, which really isn't a bad thing persay.


I agree with that mostly. I read a lot of Will's work which subsequently helped my writing to no ends. However, i didn't develop his style, i developed my own. I merely learned techniques.
#35
NONONONONONO!

Emulation stems from uncertainty and insecurity in one's own voice. Therefore, if you're emulating writers you've read extensively, the underlying problem isn't that you're too suggestible. Rather, it's something deeper, you have yet to define your own poetic or literary voice, and you're trying to fill that void with a style that doesn't belong to you.

I still believe that reading masters of literature, such as the names I dropped in the earlier post, will refine one's thinking, making writing far more eloquent.

EDIT: **Mean-spirited and snobbish remark removed.** But sorry, I'm just in a bad mood because the mods closed my Borges translation.
Last edited by *Truly Ninja* at Jul 17, 2006,
#36
Snobs... Anyway, I've never heard a professional author of novels, poetry, or any other style give the advice to not read. Stephen King noted in "On Writing" that his wife reads something like 100 books a year. Granted, the rest of the book is un-informative metaphysical bull****, but it's illustrative of a constant theme I've seen. Telling an author or poet or writer not to read within their genre, in my opinion, is akin to telling a musician not to learn theory or not to learn songs by other people because it will inhibit their creativity. I think that's simply false. Also, there's a certain hypocrisy in his instruction: he talks on end about how he's influenced by particular songwriters - well, what's a songwriter but a poet setting their poetry to music? So maybe he's not reading Leaves of Grass, but there's still influence going on there from listening to music devoutly. Also, he says the most famous poets had no one to look up to. That, in my mind, is completely false. Why would we, then, see iterations of poetic style and thought? There would be no such thing as the Romantic style if everyone in the 19th century was just doing their own thing and just by happenstance were all writing poetry that was similar, which of course is a statistical improbability so minute that for all intents and purposes it's practically impossible. Also, the idea to not rewrite is not supported by anything I've ever come across. Paul Simon once said "Great songs are not written, they're re-written." Anything can be improved, and it doesn't make something less artistic if you polish up blemishes. Just my opinion.
Hi, I'm Peter
#37
Quote by paraboetheo
I'd say that this is probably more true of more unexperienced authors, but not so much with the more developed writers. Of course, I say this from personal experience. I read sit around reading the metaphysical poets, Kant, T.S. Eliot, and Dante, but I don't find them appearing in actuality - sure, I drop allusions like there's no tomorrow when I get bored, but I'm not going to shoot for terza rima any time soon.

If anything, their ideas will stick to any reader, but the experienced writer will come to understand that style is a thing of individuality. Well, I hope...


exactly what i think ^
#38
I agree that saying something like "I don't read because of the way it would influence my writing" is a sure sign of insecurity with or underdevelopment in your artistic voice. It's a process, if you ask me. First you try and mimic your peers. Then you try and create something completely original. Then failing at the first two, you draw inspiration from your peers that becomes something original. It seems natural to me.

Regardless, congrats Matt.

Rock On
Newest Lyrics:
[url="http://www.ultimate-guitar.com/forum/showthread.php?t=727775[/url"]Pattern Recognition

Short Stories:
Anniversary
#40
Quote by Petey Cook
It's a process, if you ask me. First you try and mimic your peers. Then you try and create something completely original. Then failing at the first two, you draw inspiration from your peers that becomes something original.


That was my evolution exactly. Emulate. Original. Synthesis of the two. So yes, it definitely impacts your own writing (both conciously and sub-conciously) to read the master's stuff but not always negatively...
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