#1
I want to start learning to solo properly, has anyone got any recomendations of solos to start with and progess onto? cheers
time for heroes
#3
Quote by theusedsk8er
learn theory.


Speaking of, what are some good books to get on theory. And don't just say anyone.
#4
use a metronome and start at a low bpm slowly speed it up don't go faster until it sounds good slower
#5
Quote by MidnightHours
Speaking of, what are some good books to get on theory. And don't just say anyone.



i don't know any books but you can always try google or there are 100's of people who ask about it here and there are a bunch of tutorials here in columns and lessons.

don't tell me what to say either. he could search the forum for the words theory and find about 100,000 threads with the same question.
#6
go learn vry basic scale and chord makeup, its not that hard, and from that pick and choose from the lessons on here on what interests you. And try and take theory as theory, its quite interesting when you really get into it, dont justlearn it cause some guys(or gals) on UG said it. learn it forsome other reason. make one up if you have to, aslong as you believe it.
songs: Left Behind choices
Quote by MadClownDisease
Well I can top you all, I've done my mum, my step brother AND a cat. As well as quite a few corpses.
#7
Metronome is vital. Try Iron Man. Easy solo IMO. Take it slow.
Quote by tryhardslash
and plus you like blink 182 which prooves you are dumb and have no taste in music

you just follow trends

What a tard...
#8
Quote by theusedsk8er

don't tell me what to say either


The question was directed to everyone, so don't be so flattered.
#10
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#11
Quote by MidnightHours
Speaking of, what are some good books to get on theory. And don't just say anyone.

One of the most crucial parts of soloing is knowing your scales and modes. The Red Guitar Grimoire is basically a scales and modes encyclopedia; great for a budding soloist (and essential for any guitarist, really). It has for a long time been a favorite of mine.
And learn a few easy solos first (Black Sabbath, some Metallica), start playing them slow, and work your way up to regular speed. I find the best way to get a good solo technique is to learn other solos as well as come up with some of your own. Every day, look up a new scale, and try to come up with a lick in it. Really fun and beneficial practice.
#12
In my way of looking at it, "being able to solo" is given a chord progression, you
can play something over it on the spot. Improv. Just being able to parrot back
a solo from a song that you just memorized from a tab with no understanding of
the notes is not "soloing" in my book.

Learning a solo so that you can see how someone else used a particular concept
is a completely different story however. That IS very useful.

I have seen so many people around here that have so little theory knowledge
it's a mindnumbing wonder how they can even say they can solo on guitar.
In order to begin soloing, you actually need just an amazingly small amount
of real theory. All you really need for starters is:

1) Learn the minor pentatonic scale in all 5 positions (even just the 1st pos will do)
2) Understand why a finger position is NOT a scale.
3) Understand what a key is
4) Understand what and where the root note is (and why it doesn't have to be the first note of the finger position)
5) Given a key, find where your pentatonic positions are

That's it! Start soloing to some blues. The pentatonic won't work over everything,
but it's easy to use and works well with bluesy stuff and a lot of rock stuff as
well. Then you can start looking at other's solos and you'll see where and when
they use a pent scale and where they go outside it. That will at least give you
some context when learning a solo and eventually you can go deeper into
theory to get more understanding. Even so, most rock doesn't require a LOT of
theory.
#13
Quote by edg
That's it! Start soloing to some blues. The pentatonic won't work over everything, but it's easy to use and works well with bluesy stuff and a lot of rock stuff as well.

Hell yeah! Cheers from a blues solo enthusiast!
Blues is definitely a great scale to know. Not to mention one of the funnest for improvisation.
#15
Ok... was listening to Fade to Black (Ride the Lightning) and I have to suggest both the intro lead and the outtro lead. They both have great phrases and they sound great to play solo without jamming to the song. The intro is just mainly for the melody, and you should be proud of yourself after you learn it. The outtro solo can get kind of fast for a beginner but it sticks in one position (7th fret) for the first half of it, it uses very common techniques and teaches some popular scale patterns.

Just a suggestion,
BE
#16
Quote by beyondenraged
Ok... was listening to Fade to Black (Ride the Lightning) and I have to suggest both the intro lead and the outtro lead. They both have great phrases and they sound great to play solo without jamming to the song. The intro is just mainly for the melody, and you should be proud of yourself after you learn it. The outtro solo can get kind of fast for a beginner but it sticks in one position (7th fret) for the first half of it, it uses very common techniques and teaches some popular scale patterns.

Just a suggestion,
BE

Yes! I learned that one when I was relatively a beginner as well. A bit of a challenge, but great practice. Not to mention that the verses of that song are great for practicing fingerpicking, too.
#17
If you want a challenging solo, Dani California is for you!
Run!
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#18
actually you really need to practice your picking skill individually at first. not including the left/right hand which belongs to the fret. there are several lessons just for picking skill. maybe there are several in cyberfret.
.we are the only people who are left to save the guitar history and rock of good guitar solos will never extinct ,for we are the guitarist who are maintaining the equilibrium
#19
Quote by SethMegadefan
Hell yeah! Cheers from a blues solo enthusiast!
Blues is definitely a great scale to know. Not to mention one of the funnest for improvisation.



Yeah! its great for improv. I have a set of licks with blues scale notes, and every so often its great to just throw one in, theres always one that fits. I love this little up/down lick:


------------------5h8~~p5--------------------------------------------------------
-------------5h8------------8h5----------------------------------------------------
--------5h7----------------------8p7-5~~-----------5h7-7*br~~~--------------------
---5h7----------------------------------------5h7------------------------------------
---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
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