#1
So I am interested in mwhy certain strings are more expensive then others. Why are they and what is the diffrence? Do they make them sound diffrent and also what strings do you use and how much are they?
#2
i dunno much bout that but i use martin strings they give a pretty sweet sound and im kinda rough on them too and last pretty long . i take they one that are like 10 $ .
Genarals gather in there masses . Just like witches at black masses - Black Sabbath , War pigs
#3
I think those are the strings that I have on now. When they broke the first time I was asking some guy at guitar center if there was a big diffrence in the strings and he kinda chuckled and said yeah in a condesending way, then I ask what the diffrence was and he didn;t really answer me. I don't think he knew.
#4
some strings r cheaper then other cause some are made cheaply and they suck n rust n break. but i at www.guitarfetish.com u can get 2 dollar strings and my friends dad thought they were ernie balls... go figure lol
#6
Ernie Ball is a brand. I use them on my electric.

Why are others more expensive? Materials. Quality. Why is Martin D-28 more expensive than a Epiphone AJ-1? Materials & quality. Why is [insert name] toilet paper more expensive than the other?
#7
For an electric, your sound is mostly in your pickups.

For an acoustic, it's mostly in the strings and body design. Therefore, better strings are just better.
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#8
What about size and such? Is a larger size string stronger, or does it last longer? And what about bronze strings and other metals? Do you get a diffrent sound with diffrent types, and if so which ones and what kind? I don't play electric so im talking more about acoustic.
#9
let's not be too hasty. the kind of body wood on an electric matters a lot in addition to the pickups.
1995 MIM Fender Strat
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#10
Quote by pass2
What about size and such? Is a larger size string stronger, or does it last longer? And what about bronze strings and other metals? Do you get a diffrent sound with diffrent types, and if so which ones and what kind? I don't play electric so im talking more about acoustic.


honestly i'm not really sure whether or not larger gauge strings are stronger. i'd have to assume they would be, but you aren't going to be repelling with them so i think any gauge string should be strong enough larger gauge strings do not last any longer. bronze strings have the brightest tone. phosphor bronze strings are more mellow sounding.
#11
heavier gauge strings are supposed to give a fuller tone than lighter gauges. However they are harder on the fingers.

Don't just go and stick heavy gauge strings on any guitar, mind. If you have a small bodied guitar (000 - Grand Audotorium) then it's best not to, otherwise it may damage your guitar (according to my taylor booklet).

The difference in price is relative to the string, its design and its brand. You can get coated (like elixir nanowebs) or uncoated strings (like d'addario bronze). Coated strings may last longer, and may be more expensive, but I despise them for their slick feel - doesn't feel right when I play. At the moment I have a set of Dean Markley bronze lights... they are heaven.

Also strings depend on your playing style. I play mainly fingerstyle so I choose lights - easy on the fingers, producing clear single notes - good for blues etc. If you are playing something like acoustic rock - mediums may be the choice for you. Though it's all down to the player. Hope that helped.

htpp://www.olivergoldingmusic.com
#12
Larger gauge strings are stronger, but not for guitar. Because they're larger, you need to put more tension on them to get the same pitch out of a smaller set of strings. Thus, they're under more stress and more prone to breaking. I played with 14's for one week, loved the sound, but my playing is too aggressive for them. I was bending a note on the G string and it snapped.

Elixer's aren't the only coated, D'addario EXP's coat the outter ring before it's wound around the string, so they last just as long but they aren't slippery, unusally bright, and don't "shed" like the elixers.

Bottom line you're paying for material quality (which affects tone, ability to stay in tune, longevity etc) and coating as well. I won't buy anything other than a set of Phosphor Bronze EXP's mediums. They last for a while and I've never broke a string with them.

Bry
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#13
Quote by Bryan52803
Elixer's aren't the only coated, D'addario EXP's coat the outter ring before it's wound around the string, so they last just as long but they aren't slippery, unusally bright, and don't "shed" like the elixers.
Bry


I didn't know that. Once i'm through with my dean markley's i'll give the EXP's are run. Cheers Bry.

htpp://www.olivergoldingmusic.com
#14
I got a question, I have a Yamaha FG730S and am not sure what gauge strings I have. I got it from my local shop and when buying new strings (in anticipation for the current strings to rust) one of the guys I asked said that most acoustics had "light" (.012-.053) so I bought Elixir Nanowebs Light. Now I've read on Musicians Friend that they have a tendency to break, which I'm not sure to worry about since i don't strum or fingerpick hard (or use a pick for the most part).

On another note, when tuning, I'll use my Korg GA-30 (the black one, and it's on new batteries) and on some strings it'll waver between pitches and the needle will go crazy but stay in the same general area (like playing the high E will switch between E & A etc). Is that a problem?
#15
Hmm...Is there any brand that does have a slightly slipper surface? My dean markleys are tearing my callouses off when I play

Gear:
Partscaster/Tele into a bunch of pedals, a Maz 18 head, and a Z Best cab.
#16
Quote by ask_withnail
I didn't know that. Once i'm through with my dean markley's i'll give the EXP's are run. Cheers Bry.

I swear by the EXP's.
They don't wear out quickly. I find changing strings a hassle and therefore do not want to do it often. That is my main reason.... oh and I tend not to play a lot. I need to have coated so they don't sit there and go rusty.
#17
Quote by roamingbard13
Hmm...Is there any brand that does have a slightly slipper surface? My dean markleys are tearing my callouses off when I play


Elixirs are very smooth and easy on the fingers, but when it comes to tone I like ClrearTones, the coating is very light and they sound amazing in my opinion
#18
Quote by roamingbard13
Hmm...Is there any brand that does have a slightly slipper surface? My dean markleys are tearing my callouses off when I play


Keep it up, before you know it the pain will be gone and the callouses will be formed more permanent. I don't like slick strings because it makes classical vibrato very difficult.

Bry
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#19
Quote by FadingRoots
For an electric, your sound is mostly in your pickups.

For an acoustic, it's mostly in the strings and body design. Therefore, better strings are just better.

electric sound is mostly your amp
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#20
Quote by Desk Jocky
I swear by the EXP's.


same here. easily the best strings i've ever tried.
#21
Quote by spaminator101
electric sound is mostly your amp


Okay, yeah, but speaking strictly about the guitar, its mostly the pickups.
You know the bitter comes out better on a stolen guitar
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#22
Quote by Bryan52803
Keep it up, before you know it the pain will be gone and the callouses will be formed more permanent. I don't like slick strings because it makes classical vibrato very difficult.

Bry



I play constantly...I've been playing for a few years, I've just been looking for a brand of strings to call my own. My callouses have been tearing on these set of strings...they are very sticky compared to most. It doesn't hurt...just annoying ot have pieces of tough skin hanging off your fingertips.

Gear:
Partscaster/Tele into a bunch of pedals, a Maz 18 head, and a Z Best cab.
#23
I have em on my left fingers except for my pinkey and a huge one on my right hand thumb.
#24
my experiences so far...

best strings I've ever played: elixir phosphor bronze
worst strings I've ever played: some cheap martins. ugh....
Banging on a trash can
Drumming on a street light
#25
On an acoustic, it's all about preference, and what your guitar can take. Here's the basic differences for acoustic.

Small gauge - Lighter, twangier sound. Gives an amazing sound, but isn't as loud nor as, "full sounding." I myself use a small gauge.

Large gauge - Fuller sound. Much harder on the neck of your guitar. Much harder on your fingers. Deeper, fuller sound. Sounds almost, "rich". However, it's harder to play.


Here's a huge factor though. Do you have a 6 string, or a 12 string?

6 strings can handle higher gauges. I believe 12 gauge is considered light on a 6 string. However, I'm not so much of a 6 string guy and wouldn't know for sure.

12 strings are another story. 10 gauge is considered to be light on a 12 string, with 12's being on the heavy side. 12 gauge can be damaging on a 12 string, being as the tension is too much for the neck. Anything over 12's on a 12 string is DANGEROUS unless you are tuned obscenely low.

Notice: On a 12 string, if you are going to use any gauge larger than a 10 gauge, I HIGHLY suggest you tune your guitar down. If you are using 10 gauge, consider tuning down half a step. (Eb / D#) If you are using a 12 gauge, tune a full step down to D Standard. If you don't, you will regret it when your neck warps to hell.

If you're crazy and take that step up to 14's...may God have mercy on your guitar. Tune it down a step and a half. This my friends, is why we love the capo.


Edit : I use extra light Martin 10 gauge phospher bronze. I'm good with it. However I admit, if you've got more money than I do, you want to go with something like Elixer (spelling?) so far as brands go.
Last edited by Metatron at Jul 8, 2006,
#26
thanks metraton, I thought I was going crazy cos I've got Martin extra lights on my guitar and I ain't seen them mentioned anywhere in the forums, i thought that they're just a figment of my imagination.

But how often should guitar strings be changed? I think the ones I have on my guitar have been there for at least a month or so now. The high e and b strings have lost their shine, but the others look pretty alright to me.
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#28
Err, can anyone help me? I'm considering switching to mediums from what I believe to be lights but want to know if my Yamaha FG730 is gonna need any sort of adjustment.
#29
Quote by ChuChuX6
Err, can anyone help me? I'm considering switching to mediums from what I believe to be lights but want to know if my Yamaha FG730 is gonna need any sort of adjustment.

it probably will need an adjustment.
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#30
Quote by ChuChuX6
Err, can anyone help me? I'm considering switching to mediums from what I believe to be lights but want to know if my Yamaha FG730 is gonna need any sort of adjustment.


In the neck of your guitar, there is a rod that goes from the bottom of the neck to the top of the neck. It's sort of like a string that holds your fret board in the right position. Obviously, your strings are suspended over the frets. If your neck isn't adjusted right, the strings will either be too high above the frets and it'll be a bitch to play, or it'll be too low, hit the frets and make a terrible buzzing.

Your strings play a major part in holding the right counter-tension to the neck. If you take all the strings off, or make the strings tighter, or heavier, or a larger gauge, the tension is thrown of. Most likely when you change 2 string types, one of two things will happen:

1) Your neck will adjust to the new strings after a few days and all will be good with the world. (It's not too likely, but it happens.) Or the tension isn't changed enough that you will notice effects.

2) The tension on your guitar neck has been changed. You can go into a guitar store and have it adjusted most likely for free. It's not hard. You could easily do it yourself. If you look in the hole of your guitar, on the fret board side there is a little alan-wrench hole. By turning that left or right, you re-adjust the tension in your guitar's neck. ( If only getting rid of actual neck pain were that simple. ) So long as you don't turn it too hard, you can probably figure it out on your own.


Quote by OddOneOut

But how often should guitar strings be changed? I think the ones I have on my guitar have been there for at least a month or so now. The high e and b strings have lost their shine, but the others look pretty alright to me.


You don't need to be changing your strings every time they dull. You can change your strings when the string quality is affecting sound in a negative way. However, used strings do often make a nicer sound (in some people's opinion..mine included) than completely new strings. They wear in a bit.

You want to change your strings when one of a few things happen. If the sound is getting crappy, it might be your strings. If you are noticing the strings freying, or unraveling, you're going to want to replace that string. (Mind, make sure it's the same gauge and weight!) If the string snaps, you need to change it obviously. Other than that, you can change strings when you want to or feel it's nessisary.

Quote by merkalos666

i use phosphorous bronze d'addarios on my acoustic and i like the sound


D'addarios sound orgasmic when you tune harmonically.


Sometimes it's fun to change the type you're using just to play around with sound quality. Mediums will give you a different sound than lights or extra lights, no dobut about it. Have fun with it!
#31
Quote by ChuChuX6
Err, can anyone help me? I'm considering switching to mediums from what I believe to be lights but want to know if my Yamaha FG730 is gonna need any sort of adjustment.

I changed the stock strings (I think they were mediums) on my FG730S to lights and I had to adjust the truss rod because there was some fret buzz. Now you're doing the opposite, so the neck will warp a bit and the action goes higher. You just need to adjust the truss rod maybe ½ turn, maybe ¾ turn. But do this like ¼ turn at a time and let it rest for a day.

By the way, are there strings that are easier to bend? I can hardly do ½ a bend on the wound strings (EADG) or a full bend on the B & e strings.