#1
hi guys i'm not sure if a thread regarding this problem already exists but this is reeeeeeeeeally urgent! i was trying to correct my guitar's intonation and turns out...i cant loosen the saddle any more than it is...thats as far as it goes and yet the note on the 12th fret is flatter than the harmonic at the 12th
what do i do now???
#3
i'm not sure what its called...but my guitar is an ibanez rgx20...its a simple tremolo bridge...not the floyd rose...thats complex stuff...mine is a simple tremolo...hope that helps
#5
forget about the harmonic, its IRRELEVANT and will only give you an incorrect reading. Use the open string and the 12th an octave higher.

Regards,
Perry Ormsby

Pevious builds:
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#7
and how come everyone stresses so much on the harmonics if they're irrelevant?
#9
the harmonic will get you alot closer to perfect , if your tuner can handle it or if you are doing it by ear..
#10
Quote by danishjk
and how come everyone stresses so much on the harmonics if they're irrelevant?


Because they havent yet worked out its the incorrect and hardest way of setting intonation.

Play the open note (tuned to pitch), then change the saddle to suit a perfect octave at the fretted 12th. Disregard the harmonic pitch. Harmonic pitches can vary, depending on exactly where you finger is placed. I few mm out and it will read incorrectly, and the pitch can sway on and around a required note... not really a good base note to refer from...
Theoritically, the harmonic is in the centre of the LENGTH OF STRING (dont confuse scale length with string length), NOT directly above the 12th fret (because the saddle is compensated correct, making the string length longer?). How can you play a harmonic, if you dont know where the centre of the string is, because you dont yet have a fixed saddle position?? Rough enough ISNT good enough.

Regards,
Perry Ormsby

Pevious builds:
HERE!
#11
Quote by ormsby guitars
Because they havent yet worked out its the incorrect and hardest way of setting intonation.

Play the open note (tuned to pitch), then change the saddle to suit a perfect octave at the fretted 12th. Disregard the harmonic pitch. Harmonic pitches can vary, depending on exactly where you finger is placed. I few mm out and it will read incorrectly, and the pitch can sway on and around a required note... not really a good base note to refer from...
Theoritically, the harmonic is in the centre of the LENGTH OF STRING (dont confuse scale length with string length), NOT directly above the 12th fret (because the saddle is compensated correct, making the string length longer?). How can you play a harmonic, if you dont know where the centre of the string is, because you dont yet have a fixed saddle position?? Rough enough ISNT good enough.


that makes sense.
#12
Well for my guitar, my low e string, .046, tuned to drop C, the 12th fret is correct, but the 24th fret is like 2 semitones off. what's wrong?
#13
^2 semitones or 2 cents? 2 cents off is normal. The amount of tension added to the string is different when you get closer to the bridge and closer to the nut. That is why you adjust the intonation from the 12th fret. It's in the middle and so your intonation should be a happy medium but you will pull sharp slightly as you get farther away from the 12th fret.
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#14
guys! i dont know what to do! i tried what perry suggested, but no matter how tight or loose the saddle is, the difference between the open note and the 12th fret note remains the same! the 12th fret note is just as flat! this is reeeeally confusing! i'm using guitarfxbox tuner since i dont have real one...maybe thats faulty...i dont know
#17
ok i checked the b string and adjusted it...the B string is fine now...but i reeeeally had to loosen the saddle...almost to its limit....the high E string needs more loosening than that but its already reached its limit!
#18
so, youve loosened the saddle screw right? Make sure you give the saddle a bit of a nudge to make sure it moves. sometimes there is a groove worn in there, and it likes to stay in that position.

Regards,
Perry Ormsby

Pevious builds:
HERE!
#20
ummm ok problem not quite solved yet! i loosened the saddle and gave it a lil push...the pushing worked...that is, the saddle moved...BUT that didnt quite solve the intonation problem...i needed to loosen it a lil more...so i did...then i gave the saddle another push... and the saddle slid right off the bridge and came to halt next to the bridge pickup!!! the screw wasnt holding it anymore!!! theres something seriously wrong with this guitar...i never really noticed anything wrong with the intonation before...i realized only recently that it didnt sound quite right when i played the higher notes...
#21
1st thing you need to do is get the saddle back on.

There are a few more option that might work depending on how far off things actually are.

You could raise your action
loosen the springs on your trem
use a heavier strings
push harder when you play the higher frets
it could even be as easy as changing the brand of strings

Compensation at the nut might be an option as well. How is the intonation on the 7th fret? How is it on the 20th fret?
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#22
how would raising the action help? would i need to loosen the saddles less if i raise the action?
i tried using heavier strings once but it ****ed up the neck's relief...lol that was painful...i'm not doing that again...
pushing harder at higher frets doesnt do it either...the note is way too flat...i have to bend the string considerably to get the right note...
i could try changing the brand of strings i guess... by the way, mine are pretty old and a lil rusty...does that affect intonation?
#23
If they are old strings that could be your whole problem. I'd change them before I adjusted anything else

Raising the action means you have to strech the strings more to make contact with the fret which in turn makes the string a little sharp so yeah... It means that the saddle doesn't need to be as loose.
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#24
yeah k i was think bout changing the strings anyway...but really...i thought this intonation thing was all about the length of the string...how can old strings make a difference...
#25
The rust and gunge on old strings changes the nodes. That means the regular mathmatical formular for fretspacing is thrown out the window.
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#26
i see...well i just snapped my high E trying to reintonate...i guess a new pack is in order then... thanks for your help! really appreciate!