#1
I would greatly appreciate it if you fellows could give me some alternatives to power chords...I know the obvious thing would be bar chords...but I'm looking for something a little more exotic. Maybe something like inverted power chords with a note or two added...so what say you?
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#2
add the third(might be fifth i get confused by the two) and take away the root
so it would be like x443xx
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#9
ok..something else..

x
x
x
9
7
7

Instead of the 5th that would be a 4th power chord right?
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#10
Ok I know about thirds...they don't really fit into what I want...kinda like an art rock thing i guess you could say is what im looking for.
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#11
Quote by Mudllica
ok..something else..

x
x
x
9
7
7

Instead of the 5th that would be a 4th power chord right?
I would normally think of that as an E5 chord with the 5th in the bass. I wouldn't think of that as any kind of B chord, though if it fits as a B chord, feel free to use it.
#12
ahh yes...gotcha.
God.....Why did I add Mudvayne to my name?
Please forgive me my fellow brothers (and sisters i guess..?) in guitar.
#13
Quote by sadistic_monkey
x
x
x
7
5
3

For example. Sound good when used in the right place.


Which could be thought of as a 5add9 chord, or powerchord with an added 9th. Which is what I was going to put lol.

For a more tense sound, you could use tritones, which would be a root and b5 interval.

Ex: Tritone with an E root

A - 1
E - 0
#14
I'm surprised no one has mentioned Fourths (unless I'm totally overlooking it in the above posts). These are the closely related to Power Chords and work well in a rock context.

Fourths sound nice on their own, but if you use this with your Power Chords, it really adds some cool sounds. If your Power Chord is this:

x
x
x
5
5
3

Add some variety to it by changing to a fourth occasionally by playing something like this:

x
x
x
x
3
3

If you bounce back and fourth between those, it works really well. I like to use this in the same way I would hammer additional notes in a triad to spice a progression up. I personally play Power Chords with only my ring and index finger (and my index barres the E an A string), so it makes the transition from a Fourth to a Fifth effortless -- I just lift up my ring finger. It may not sound as smooth if you're doing three finger Power Chords.
Last edited by Bob Sacamano at Jul 6, 2006,
#16
Also, Octaves are fun to play with some distortion. Basically, just remove the Fifth from the chord and mute that string with the side of your finger. As I said with fourths above, these are interesting to mix in with your Power Chords. I like to play a riff in Power Chords then play the same riff again using only octaves. Sounds pretty cool.

x
x
x
5
x
3
#17
Quote by psychodelia
Which could be thought of as a 5add9 chord, or powerchord with an added 9th. Which is what I was going to put lol.
It's a sus2 chord.
#22
We're giving you suggestions but don't just REPLACE power chords with those chords. They have to follow a sequence to sound good, which requires theory. Chord inversions on higher strings work well, but they require a good bass player with moving bass lines if you're in a band situation.

Oh yeah and everytime somebody refers to any 3 fingered shape as "a different type of power chord" I shoot someone. You could be next.
#23
Ok the sus2 chords are sounding good...and something like the E5/B sound cool too. Not really a fan of octaves. Some more examples of inverted stuff would be nice...
God.....Why did I add Mudvayne to my name?
Please forgive me my fellow brothers (and sisters i guess..?) in guitar.
#24
Quote by bangoodcharlote
It's a sus2 chord.


I'd venture a guess he said it was a '5add9' to make sure that all those reading understood that it was just a powerchord with an extra note. But yes, it's definitely a sus2 chord.

#26
^wouldnt it be better to say add9 instead of sus2 since the 9th is the octave of the 2....
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#27
Quote by Night_Lights
^wouldnt it be better to say add9 instead of sus2 since the 9th is the octave of the 2....
Bsus2 and Badd9 are very different. Bsus2 is B F# C# while Badd9 is B D# F# C#.
#28
Technically, the "sus" chord is not really a chord at all in traditional theory - there can only be major, minor augmented or diminished triads. in traditional theory, a suspended 2 resolves down to the root. However, most contemporary pop/jazz charts use the sus (or sus4) and sus2 to indicate a chord with a root and a fifth with an added 4th or 2nd, respectively. Add2 is exactly that - add the 2nd to the complete triad. The "2" designation is the one that is gets used a couple of different ways - usually in place of add2 or less frequently to indicate a combination of just the root and the 2nd. FWIW, the "2" designation will probably stabilize with a commonly accepted form in the next few years. As Pete pointed out, the "5" indication has only recently (in terms of chord structure) come to be an accepted suffix by the major publishers and pretty much understood by most musicians. The "2" suffix hasn't been around long enough for everyone to agree with its meaning.
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#29
Quote by Night_Lights
^wouldnt it be better to say add9 instead of sus2 since the 9th is the octave of the 2....


That was the thought process I took when I named 5add9, but really that's an unnecessary way to name a chord when sus2 is the definition. It's just an open voicing of a sus2, I think.