#1
Tascam Portastudio 414mkII

Would this be enough to record a full band? As in vocals, guitar, bass, drums, keyboards? I've heard that this is more of a thing for singer/songwriters by themselves, but other bands in my area have recorded with this but used a seperate mixer to go into this. I am thinking about getting this mixer since it's cheap and efficient (I've had experience with this one in another band.)

Yamaha MG10/2 Stereo Mixer

Anyways, do you think this setup would be efficient for recording a full band?

Also, I'm sorry if this is supposed to go somewhere else. I didn't know where else to put it.
#2
To be honest that kind of recording is so complicated.. and visually you have nothing to show you what's going on. I prefer digital recording of some kind.

If you can afford to stretch your budget a bit more the options available to you are a lot better and much more long term (as I imagine recording with that thing would phase out for something like this before long).

http://www.musiciansfriend.com/product/Digidesign-Mbox-2-Factory-Bundle?sku=241730

This thing is nice. It comes with ProTools, and you won't need to get the mixer unless you want to record all your tracks at once. You can lay down drums, then bass, then keys, then rhythm, then lead, then vocals, and it has a wide array of effects and stuff that you can utilize.

Now it's complex as all hell, but it's much more professional-sounding in the end.
#3
Wow, recording to tape, it's the 21st Century now. I wouldn't want to be using one of those. You could basically get a tape recorder and output the mixer to the tape recorder, that seems virtually like the same thing. But honestly get something digital, it's worth the extra money.
#4
Quote by take_it_t
Wow, recording to tape, it's the 21st Century now. I wouldn't want to be using one of those. You could basically get a tape recorder and output the mixer to the tape recorder, that seems virtually like the same thing. But honestly get something digital, it's worth the extra money.

I own a Portastudio 424 Mk III and I agree with his post. I bought one before the digital recording market got affordable. It's cool for using as a mixing board recording to digital media (which is what I do), and using tape isn't horrible, but you'll find a LOT of sound quality lost if you bounce down at all. Digital recording is your best bet.
Hi, I'm Peter
#5
Now, we do have a limited budget. And I have experience with digital recording and I don't like how clean it is, we do know what we're doing production wise, but we just simply don't have the money for digital recording.
#6
Fair enough. Then what you could do is use a mixer to record the whole band down to tape, and then run the tape into a computer that has Audacity. That'll remove the sterility that you don't like, but you won't have the loss of sound quality associated with bouncing down.
Hi, I'm Peter
#8
Quote by joshsirjoshules
We have GarageBand, will that help?

garage band would be a better choice than a cassette 4 track.

the audio quality on a cassette is just awful, unless you're recording old school black metal it won't cut it.
http://www.musiciansfriend.com/product/Tascam-DP01-Digital-8Track-Portastudio?sku=241106
http://www.musiciansfriend.com/product/Fostex-MR8-mkII-8Track-Digital-Recorder?sku=240343
http://www.musiciansfriend.com/product/Fostex-MR8-8Track-Digital-Recorder?sku=240239
these are better options for the money, digital 8 tracks that will do the job much better than the cassette.

If you've got a decent p.c., this may also be worth considering (i'm thinking of getting Spike myself)
http://www.musiciansfriend.com/product/Mackie-SPIKE-2496k-Compact-Recording-System-?sku=248150

Then just use a mixer when you need to record more instruments than there are inputs.
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#9
Whoa I didn't know Tascam had digital for that cheap. And I was looking for some just a minute ago. Thanks man.