#1
I ran a search and i couldn't really find the answer I was looking for, and I can't really tell from songs whether i'm not doing it right or if it's just my gear...so I guess I'll just ask? hehe sorry if the topic's been done to death

anyway, I was trying to play artificial harmonics (fret note, place index finger 12 frets up the neck, then pick etc.) and I always keep hitting an octave higher than the original note (which, I guess, is the same effect as if i had fretted the note i'm lightly touching on with the index) I'm not sure if its supposed to sound like it. I'm 100% sure i'm not pushing too hard on the nodal fret, since i can move my picking hand down the string and have it sound muted rather than ring the octave (like it does for me normally)

so where I'm going with this.....is a 'pinched harmonic' just an octave higher than the fretted note, just with a more 'metally' sound? in that case wouldn't an artificial (non-pinched, i'm assuming) harmonic just be a sound normally achievable by fretting an octave higher? or...are AHs supposed to be notes that aren't achievable on the fretboard normally? in the case of the latter, I don't think i've ever achieved that sound by following all of the instructional stuff...hehe can someone help me out? thanks in adv
#2
no a pinched harmonic sounds like a high pitched squeal. i doubt you could get that on the fretboard.
The Gear:

Custom Strat
Mesa Boogie Stiletto Ace
Fulltone OCD
Electro Harmonix Small Clone Chorus
Dunlop Crybaby Classic
MXR EVH-117 Flanger
Fulltone Soul Bender
#3
but in that case, what is an artificial harmonic that is not pinched? I heard that it's different from a pinched harmonic because the pinched one sounds like a high pitched squeal, like you said....so in that case wouldn't that AH be just an octave of the fretted note?
#4
i think so
The Gear:

Custom Strat
Mesa Boogie Stiletto Ace
Fulltone OCD
Electro Harmonix Small Clone Chorus
Dunlop Crybaby Classic
MXR EVH-117 Flanger
Fulltone Soul Bender
#5
add some really intense vibrato to a pinch harmonic to make it not sound like an octive.

And it sounds like your just doing natural harmonics.
#6
What you're doing, if I understand your post correctly, is called a harp harmonic.

An artificial harmonic is heard when you pick a note over the pickups (if you're trying this on an acoustic... don't) and immediately brush the string with your thumb to get a high pitched squeal.

A natural harmonic is heard when you lightly rest a finger over the fretwire and pick the string.

And a harp harmonic (aka tap harmonic) is what you're doing now.
Quote by Resiliance
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I be doin' some 'o dat sarcasm **** right thurr.
#7
ohh okay! I think i've got it correctly now, it's starting to sound right thanks a lot everyone!
#8
no, a tap harmonic is when you tap the fret 12 frets below what you are fingering.
The Gear:

Custom Strat
Mesa Boogie Stiletto Ace
Fulltone OCD
Electro Harmonix Small Clone Chorus
Dunlop Crybaby Classic
MXR EVH-117 Flanger
Fulltone Soul Bender
#9
Quote by Trapman870
no, a tap harmonic is when you tap the fret 12 frets below what you are fingering.


...What?

So if I'm fingering the 17th fret, I should tap the 5th fret of the same string?

...k. Try that and tell me what happens.
Quote by Resiliance
I ain't dissin' ya bro.

I be doin' some 'o dat sarcasm **** right thurr.
#10
no you idiot, if you finger the 5th fret you tap the 17th for the harmonic.
The Gear:

Custom Strat
Mesa Boogie Stiletto Ace
Fulltone OCD
Electro Harmonix Small Clone Chorus
Dunlop Crybaby Classic
MXR EVH-117 Flanger
Fulltone Soul Bender
#11
I think I made the same mistake you made when I first started learning about pinch harmonics. You're trying to play a pinch harmonic by first playing an artificial one first and then pinching on top of it right?

I think cyberfret.com has a couple of videos on playing pinch harmonics. You play pinch harmonics at the pickups, not at the fretboard; You don't even have to touch the fretboard to play a pinch harmonic.
#12
A pinch harmonic is when you fret a note and when you pick it, you let your thumb hit the string lightly right after you pick the note. The bridge pickup works best for this. You also get different pitched pinches when you pick in different spots on the string.
#13
Quote by Trapman870
no, a tap harmonic is when you tap the fret 12 frets below what you are fingering.


Quote by Trapman870
no you idiot, if you finger the 5th fret you tap the 17th for the harmonic.


I know how to do it, just learn to explain things properly the first time.
Quote by Resiliance
I ain't dissin' ya bro.

I be doin' some 'o dat sarcasm **** right thurr.
#14
Trapman870 you're stupid. Explain things properly next time before you call people idiots.
Threadstarter what you are playing is not a pinch harmonic like everyone is saying. Even though they can be called artificial harmonics which makes it confusing. It isn't a touch/tap harmonic either because with that you tap the fret 12 frets up from the the original note after you pick the original note. What your doing is fretting a note then placing one of your picking fingers over a fret, 12 frets up and then picking, all at the same time. Just think of it is a natural harmonic but with fretted notes.
Listen to some Satriani, he uses them alot in his songs.
Last edited by ferretman at Jul 8, 2006,
#15
oh man guys don't fight you guys are sayin the same thing, just one of you said above and the other said below lol. it's all good :p

and yeah, I think I got it now the cyberfret.com videos cleared things up for me as well thanks!