#1
Sometimes instead of seeing a ii-V-I progression (Dm7, G7, Cmaj7), i see a Dm7, Galt, Cmaj7. Why do you make the V altered istead of a regular dominant seven? And how do you alter a chord?
~Long live the 6-string~
#2
You make it an altered chord to create a lot of tension. It is kind of a jazz thing. You alter a chord by adding some combination of b9, #9, #11, #5, and b13 (am I missing any?). We call it Galt rather than G7b9#11#5 (or whatever crazy alterations there are) because Galt is so much easier to write.

Actually, in a large jazz band, the guitarist can probably get away with playing a regular dominant chord where there are altered chords since the piano and such will be taking care of the alterations. This is especially useful to know if your music just says Galt and you don't know what alterations there are.
#3
Yeah, BGC's got it.

Play G7 then Cmaj7. Now, play G7#9/G7b9/any Galt chord then Cmaj7.

Which one gives you more "need to go somewhere" pull? Probably the Galt...
Looking for my India/Django.
#5
Quote by bangoodcharlote
You make it an altered chord to create a lot of tension. It is kind of a jazz thing. You alter a chord by adding some combination of b9, #9, #11, #5, and b13 (am I missing any?)


Maybe b5? The lessons I've seen on altered chords have the alterations usually in terms of 9 and 5. Everything else looks good though.
#6
^occasionally. I see more alts with major fifths but #4s...
Looking for my India/Django.
#7
You can voice it like this.


|-----9------|          Calt7
|-----9------|
|-----9------|
|-----8------|
|-----9------|        
|-----8------|
UG Blues Mafia
Founding Members: Forklifterer, Steve Cropper, Crzyrckgtrst28, and TNfootballfan62


Member of the Anti-Whammy-Bar-Solo Club