#1
The title says it all. From time to time here in MT, I see a thread with someone asking "What scale can I use to solo over this chord progession?" and someone will just answer it. How can you tell which scale to use?

Thanks


-KR
#2
well, when a man loves a woman.....

oh wait, um if all the notes you play in the solo are in the chords or they resolve quickly then thats how you tell. though that may be wrong or i didn't explain very good

or you could cheat, say the first chord is Cm, then play the Cm pentatonic. usually that works
Quote by yorkshireterror
Dunlop's got the right idea
Oh yeah, only took me a few months
Founder of the "I Support Robert Keeley Mods," if you like them too, put this in your sig!

i <3 breakdowns
#3
http://www.ultimate-guitar.com/lessons/for_beginners/learning_music_theory_the_beginning.html

this pretty much has some of the basic ideas behind it...it's just a matter of knowing which key you're in, and knowing which scale would achieve the sound you want...playing a major-sounding mode (such as ionian) over a minor progression is fine, but a minor-sounding mode (such as dorian) would fit better and achieve a different sound...knowing the modes, intervals, and basic chord theory will help you on this journey
Quote by BigFatSandwich
it took you 15 consecutive hours of practice to realize that playing guitar makes you better at playing guitar. congratulations.


Quote by Sharp_as_steel
Axe_grinder pwns!!!!



Member #2 of the "Official UG Teabaggers' Cult". PM Slayer224 to join.
#4
Quote by axe_grinder247
http://www.ultimate-guitar.com/lessons/for_beginners/learning_music_theory_the_beginning.html

this pretty much has some of the basic ideas behind it...it's just a matter of knowing which key you're in, and knowing which scale would achieve the sound you want...playing a major-sounding mode (such as ionian) over a minor progression is fine, but a minor-sounding mode (such as dorian) would fit better and achieve a different sound...knowing the modes, intervals, and basic chord theory will help you on this journey

Ahh, thanks for that link and your post
#5
Quote by axe_grinder247
http://www.ultimate-guitar.com/lessons/for_beginners/learning_music_theory_the_beginning.html

this pretty much has some of the basic ideas behind it...it's just a matter of knowing which key you're in, and knowing which scale would achieve the sound you want...playing a major-sounding mode (such as ionian) over a minor progression is fine, but a minor-sounding mode (such as dorian) would fit better and achieve a different sound...knowing the modes, intervals, and basic chord theory will help you on this journey

um playing a major scale over a minor progression would lead to some gnarly dissonances... the chords are there to support the melody. if you want to play a melody note that's out of key, don't just play it over a chord that's in key, change the chord to fit it. let's say you're playing the notes C B A G# over an A minor progression: Am, G, F, Em, and you're playing one note per chord. well the G# is out of key and clashes with the G natural in the Em chord. but instead of forcing it, you could change the Gnatural to a G#, making an E major chord, which works just fine in this progression. this is just an example, the E major chord may already be written, but you get the idea. certain chords and certain notes match up (or at least clash in measureable ways) so be aware of notes in relation to chords.
#6
Quote by Dan Steinman
um playing a major scale over a minor progression would lead to some gnarly dissonances... the chords are there to support the melody. if you want to play a melody note that's out of key, don't just play it over a chord that's in key, change the chord to fit it. let's say you're playing the notes C B A G# over an A minor progression: Am, G, F, Em, and you're playing one note per chord. well the G# is out of key and clashes with the G natural in the Em chord. but instead of forcing it, you could change the Gnatural to a G#, making an E major chord, which works just fine in this progression. this is just an example, the E major chord may already be written, but you get the idea. certain chords and certain notes match up (or at least clash in measureable ways) so be aware of notes in relation to chords.


what i meant was along the lines of playing a C major scale over an A minor chord progression, which would theoretically fit but wouldn't stress or "bring out" the sound of the progression as well as, D dorian
Quote by BigFatSandwich
it took you 15 consecutive hours of practice to realize that playing guitar makes you better at playing guitar. congratulations.


Quote by Sharp_as_steel
Axe_grinder pwns!!!!



Member #2 of the "Official UG Teabaggers' Cult". PM Slayer224 to join.
#7
Well, for people who DON'T have everything memorized yet and are just playing around with a chord progression, if you have the chord progression playing, just play scales over it until you find the best sounding one. Most will just sound horrible with it, so it's not very hard to get down to a couple scales that work well with the chord progression.
My Gear:

Washburn WI14 Electric
Washburn D10s Acoustic
Marshall MG100HDFXR Special Edition
Marshall MG412AR Special Edition

Quote by Danno13
^Xenn is my favorite MG owner EVAR.

Quote by jj1565
^ Xenn fav MG user evar