#1
I keep reading anchoring is bad on these forums
I went on youtube and watched alot of the best players in the world and they do not anchor so I fugure thats the way to go!

I tried playing nonanchored and it is very hard for me. It feels very akward and unnatural. I do see how it could help fluidity, but I am left handed playing right handed guitar so im not sure if my right arm has the dexterity to not anchor

Now my question
1) Is it supposed to feel relly wierd and make me play alot slower at first?
2) What do i do with the rest of my fingers?
3) Are scales a good way to practice this new technique?
4) Has anyone recently switched to non-anchored, and how long did it take you to grasp it, and do you notice a great improvement?
-Ibanez SAS36FM
-B.C. Rich Warcock Platinum Edition (my first guitar, noob mistake)
-Roland Cube-30
#2
1.Yes, but you'll get the hang of it in time
2.?
3.Very much so
4. I switch from resting on the bridge, I guess it's a little better
#4
Alright thanks man

for #2: When i go unanchored my 3 fingers not used for holding the pic really wanna anchor, should i hod my hand in a loose fist?
-Ibanez SAS36FM
-B.C. Rich Warcock Platinum Edition (my first guitar, noob mistake)
-Roland Cube-30
#5
Quote by sixstringbandit
Now my question
1) Is it supposed to feel relly wierd and make me play alot slower at first?
2) What do i do with the rest of my fingers?
3) Are scales a good way to practice this new technique?
4) Has anyone recently switched to non-anchored, and how long did it take you to grasp it, and do you notice a great improvement?

Eh, I don't think anchoring is all bad. I think it all depends on the situation. I'm no expert, but I'll try to answer your questions...

1) yes. but that's true for any new technique you try to learn

2) stand up, hold your arm at your side, relaxed, and let your hand and fingers hang naturally. they're slightly curved, right? now touch your thumb and index fingers together like you're holding a pick. that's about where your fingers should be.

3) Yes. Also, get some string skipping in there to work on your accuracy.

4) Like I said, I tend to use both depending on the situation. If I'm more concerned with speed or I'm hybrid picking, or palm muting, I'll go unanchored. If I'm playing something that's kinda complicated and I really want to focus on being accurate, I'll anchor. I also don't anchor if I'm fingerpicking.
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#6
i dont know why but people say you play slower when you anchor but ive seen some fast guitarist anchor and still play fast
#8
Quote by im_hungry
mab anchors and hes kinda fast

Alexi Laiho anchors, and he is really fast.
#9
1) Is it supposed to feel relly wierd and make me play alot slower at first?
Yes. It feels weird because you're not used to it.

2) What do i do with the rest of my fingers?
Cut them off. No, but what BigFatSandwich said is just about right.

3) Are scales a good way to practice this new technique?
Relearning songs you're used to anchoring with probably a better place to start.

4) Has anyone recently switched to non-anchored, and how long did it take you to grasp it, and do you notice a great improvement?
I switched to non-anchoring and I was skeptical because it felt slower. After about a month I was picking REDICULOUSLY faster and I felt like a better guitar player.

Anchoring is a bad habit. There are exceptions, but anybody can become decent using a poor technique (it just takes a lot more work). You're more likely to develop things like carpal tunnel syndrome if you play that way since it puts more stress on your fingers. You use your anchor as a way for you to know where the strings are, but shouldn't you be able to tell without it? You should be able to trust yourself as player to hit the right strings. You also can't hybrid pick or use a whammy bar very well if you anchor. Hitting lower strings, string skips, and sweep picking become a challenge too... Playing is easier and more economical once you get it down.

Quote by Zofar
Alexi Laiho anchors, and he is really fast.

Shawn Lane didn't anchor, and he's faster.
#10
What's anchoring? Never heard of the term. From what I gather it seems like a bad picking technique?
#11
It's when you place your pinkey on the pickguard to be more accurate (for some). It's really what you're used to, it doesn't make much difference.

And Zofar, I'm pretty sure the guy was being sarcastic. As far as I know Alexi isn't near as fast as MAB.

edit: MrNojocktoday (I think?), I'm completely going to disagree with you. Anchoring is not a bad habit, it's a habit. I don't think it really makes you slower. I'm sure that when anchoring you can be as fast as someone who doesn't anchor.

But since you say you were picking mad faster without it, I'll give it a shot.
Last edited by Y00p at Jul 8, 2006,
#12
Quote by Y00p
It's when you place your pinkey on the pickguard to be more accurate (for some). It's really what you're used to, it doesn't make much difference.

And Zofar, I'm pretty sure the guy was being sarcastic. As far as I know Alexi isn't near as fast as MAB.

edit: MrNojocktoday (I think?), I'm completely going to disagree with you. Anchoring is not a bad habit, it's a habit. I don't think it really makes you slower. I'm sure that when anchoring you can be as fast as someone who doesn't anchor.

But since you say you were picking mad faster without it, I'll give it a shot.


Well you can't really blame me for having such a biased opinion. I played for a long time anchored then finally I unanchored and my overall playing capacity increased. Not only will it affect your playing but it can lead to physical complications down the line... there's no reason to risk it.
#13
I'm not blaming you at all, you have good points to support your opinion, but to be honest the 'physical complications down the line' are totally non-existant, not for me anyway.
Maybe you can indeed pick way faster now since you don't anchor, because you were putting too much stress on your fingers. Maybe your anchoring technique wasn't at all good. And I only speak for myself now, but there is no extra stress on my fingers when anchoring, at all. Maybe even less then when I'm not.

Add: You can only speak for your own playing, you can't tell me my playing is limited because of the anchoring. As I said earlier, maybe your 'wrong' (let's call it that) way of anchoring was indeed limiting your playing, but that doesn't mean you can call it a handicap, or that anyone who anchors is handicapped. Which you are doing, basically.
Last edited by Y00p at Jul 8, 2006,
#14
its not a big deal. anchoring does ****. it all depends on how lazy your hand is. its harder to start anchoring and theres no point and if you do then your lazy because you cant even hold your hand in a place without resting it.

dont anchor it makes you grow accostomed to resting it and your hand doesnt get stronger.

to strengthen your hand dont anchor and try buckethead tapping where he mutes up by the nut with fretting hand and taps with picking hand.
Quote by GizmoKaKa
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Quote by guitar?
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#15
Haha, well actually I felt no stress on my picking hand at all. As far as anchoring goes my "style" of anchoring was just as good (I used the term lightly) as anyone elses. Physically, I just realized the potential to pick quickly and accurately is greater unanchored than unanchored so I tried it.

Admirable effort at using my own words against me mate. :-p

Oh yeah, you might want to talk to Freepower, who's an expert on the entire issue. Look at the Anchor or no Anchor? topic. He gives specific examples of professional players that anchor and can't move their hand when they wake up in the morning. There are interviews with those players that say if they could relearn guitar, they would do it unanchored. Such players also end up having to go through physical therapy and expensive heat treatment... it's not a coincidence since these are people that choose guitar as a profession with anchoring as their choice of picking technique.

A lot of people also say that only reason you don't feel the stress is because you're used to it. Doesn't make it any better for you does it?
#16
Oh, I switch it up for different things. You should learn to use all techniques when required rather than just sticking to one.
#17
Actually, it does make it better for me, and I'll be sure to read up on the issue, thank you very much. I'm still skeptical to waking up in the morning with a non-moving hand, but I guess I don't want to go to far down the road, best change while I still can.

They say experiencing is believing, and I really don't want to experience that.

Hate to admit, but you've won me over. I'll try the non-anchoring.
Haha, does that make you feel better?

#18
It's when you place your pinkey on the pickguard to be more accurate


im not sure what anchoring is, but from what i gather its when you place your little finger on the pick guard... i only do this when i finger pick but never any other time, which is a bit strange as ive been playing for years but never had proper lessons and never even knew what it was, it seems to make everything so much more comfortable when i fingerpick. why is it so wrong?
#19
Quote by Crazimak
im not sure what anchoring is, but from what i gather its when you place your little finger on the pick guard... i only do this when i finger pick but never any other time, which is a bit strange as ive been playing for years but never had proper lessons and never even knew what it was, it seems to make everything so much more comfortable when i fingerpick. why is it so wrong?


anchoring is basically planting any part of your hand onto the guitar while you play. It increases tension, and makes using complicated techniques such as string skipping much more difficult. It can also lead to injuries of the wrist like carpal tunnel. It basically has no advantages, and can hurt you.


And to the people saying that some fast players anchor, just watch them - the tension is sooo noticeable when you compare it to greats who don't anchor such as Shawn Lane, Paul Gilbert, Andy Timmons, etc.
#20
Quote by sixstringbandit

1) Is it supposed to feel relly wierd and make me play alot slower at first?
2) What do i do with the rest of my fingers?
3) Are scales a good way to practice this new technique?
4) Has anyone recently switched to non-anchored, and how long did it take you to grasp it, and do you notice a great improvement?


https://www.ultimate-guitar.com/forum/showthread.php?p=6133567#post6133567

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