#1
hey how come like the progression in G could be like.. G,C,Bm,Amaj.
why does Amaj work with G sometimes? And how come songs can go like Emaj, G, D, A when theres 4 majors there and only 3 in a key. but it sounds good?
cheers
- tommy
#2
it goes into using church modes and notes reacting to one another. i suggest you start by learning the theory behind church modes and their chord progressions and work your way up from there

www.theorylessons.com modal theory
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#3
*blink* it does? Modality hasn't much to do with this actually.. it's a mixture of borrowed chords, and a form of chromatic harmony. I'm really not sure it's worth a drawn out explaination that probably won't be understood without knowing a lot of other theory, so I'll spare you.

Amag - G works just like Am-G would, and vice versa, the difference is one note. The C or C# for the chord isn't very important to its voice leading (unless it's in the bass, or in the top note, and doing either on a guitar isn't 'normal'). For the minor chord, the C wants to move down to B, and for the major, the C# wants to move up to D. That's the only difference between that progression. Even if those notes don't do that, you'll still hear it, because the note is picked up elsewhere, and you'll hear it in the overtone series. The rest of the chord just works around the descending bass, and doesn't really matter.

For two chords seperated by step, either one can be major or minor, and it doesn't affect the progression, unless one of those chords is an acting dominant, or the resolution of a cadence. It's that simple.

The Emaj example is even easier to explain... or it would be if I were sure you groked harmonic sequences. Basically any time you have a chord that moves down by fifth, say D-G (V - I in G), you have a "progression". It's the same thing up by fourth; it's still D-G, but the other direction. [Almost] Any time you have an actual progression, the first chord of the progression can be made major (or dominant 7th) -- even if it's not supposed to be. See, for instance, C-G-A7-Dm-G7-C -- where the A7 is nowhere near being in the key of C (modified leading tone and modified tonic). This is a "Secondary Dominant" chord.

Your Emaj sequence is just that in reverse (or "retrogression" for the technical term), starting on the G. Why E-G, and then D (neither are in Emaj)? Because the D is flat (from D#) to make the chord major and leave the top half diatonic; the same alteration to G to make the seperation a perfect fifth is just natural, and makes more sense for iii anyway.

This has exactly **** all to do with modes.
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#4
hah cheers. so if you just go like a half step out of key it dont matter. cool
cheers!
- tommy
#5
No... I want you to think about that for a second. You can't go more than a half step out of any key.

What I'm telling you is that in certain cases, which chords you use, and their tonality, can change, and doesn't necessarily have to be strictly diatonic.
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