#1
Is there any chance that someone could tell me some stuff on resonant tuning? I definitly like the way harmonic tuning sounds, and everyone tells me that the more advanced resonant tunings sound even more amazing.

If anyone could fill me in, or post a lesson, that would be very sweet.

Thanks!
#2
u mean Alternate Tunings or what ?
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#3
my bros in a wicked band he tunes it by ear using some harmonic thing.. i just tell if its in tune by the next string down vibrating when the string ur pressing is played
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#4
Read my lesson on tuning. It covers that tuning under section 8;

basic to advanved tuning
They dont sound amazing. Its just a better way to get your guitar exactly in tune.
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#5
I actually don't understand what people think is so amazing about harmonic tuning. Everyone that sees me tune my guitar like that thinks that I'm some kind of super-human because my ears are just so insanely in tune with the music that I can get my guitar to sound good without the aid of a tuner. But I think, it's pretty easy. :|
#6
Do you mean tunings where the vibration of one string makes the corresponding string vibrate in unison I'm not sure if you can do that with guitar. You probably mean what the guys above me said though, so just ignore that.
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#7
That's exactly what I meant ChordProgressiv. You can do it with a guitar, I've seen it done.

Logz, I am looking for types of tuning not included in that lesson, I've read it before. I know how to harmonic tune. I've got perfect pitch, and am annoied to hell when things aren't in tune with one another. So to me, it does sound amazing.

There are more advanced types of tuning, based on sound theory that make strings vibrate and resonate off one another differently, and I was just wondering if anyone knew any of those methods. I have had a hard time finding any on google.
#10
Look into the Buzz Fienten tuning system. I misread your meaning ealier, sorry my link was no help.

But if I get what you are asking about now, the Buzz Fienten system allows perfect intonation of the guitar in all positions (or so the story goes). I have yet to play a guitar equiot with this system so I cannot attest to it's effectiveness, but Larry Carlton uses it, so there must be somethibng to it.
#11
Alright, thanks. I will give it a try, and see if this is what I was looking for.
#12
Quote by Metatron

Logz, I am looking for types of tuning not included in that lesson, I've read it before. I know how to harmonic tune. I've got perfect pitch, and am annoied to hell when things aren't in tune with one another. So to me, it does sound amazing.


I cover resonant tuning - Except its section 7 sorry:
This section tells you how you can hear and feel that the guitar is out of tune.


7. Advanced Tuning - not need for basic tuning.
This chapter assumes you know how to tune and have a good trained ear. This part will teach you how to further develop your trained ear, and how to physically feel the inconsistancies within two strings. I aim in this chapter to make your tuning perfect, and when I say perfect, and I mean perfect, it'll sound even more amazing.

First of all, I'll start with being able to hear the inconsistancies. This is a branch off harmonic tuning, which I will discuss later. Basically, when you get a string vibrating it produces a frequency. As you may or may not know the frequency is like a wiggly line which goes up and down. Now, this wave determines what the vibration is going to sound like, otherwise known as its pitch. Imagine you take this frequency, and another one the exact same. If you over lap them perfectly, it'll only look like one frequency, right? This is what you are aiming for and is refered to as two frequencies being in phase. If you were to theoretically "stretch" one of these wiggly lines, it would not be able to fit behind the other one perfectly. This is refered to it being out of phase.

Now, you may be wondering, what's this got to do with anything? Well the answer is, these frequencies, like I said before, give off different sounds and pitches. Now, do this. Turn the tuner of the Low E string slightly. This will make your Low E out of tune, obviously. Now, play the 5th fret of the Low E and the A string open, as you would in standard tuning with a lot of distortion. It sounds horrible right?! That's because those two frequencies have different wavelengths, and this makes it easy to recognise by producing a horrible noise! Now, it may just seem like a nasty noise to begin with, but do this, turn the tuner slowly in different directions. Now, you can hear that nasty wobbling noise get faster and slower right! This is two vibrating strings being at different wavelengths, and as you change the tension in the string by altering the tuner, that wavelength adjusts accordingly.

So, think about it, if that fast wobbly noise is nasty, then an extremely slow, or non existing wobbly will be nice! So all you have to do is retune your E to Standard, but listen to this resonating. As you re-tune, you are aiming to get the wobble or the resonance to completely dissapear. If you listen closely, you'll be able to hear when it stops, and then you will have two completely, perfectly in tune strings. You can do this with any fret, anywhere on the fretboard. It doesnt matter where harmonic points are or anything. As long as you have distortion, you'll be able to easily hear this resonance. Now we have covered being able to hear this resonance, we can move onto being able to feel it.

When you play the guitar, you may feel it wobble slightly. This is because the wood absorbs the shockwave created by the string, and turns it into energy in the wood. This energy is dissipated by making the wood shake slightly. You can use this to help aid in resonant tuning (mentioned above). Play the slightly detuned 5th fret Low E and the A string open again. You can hear the two frequencies resonating out of phase. Now, pay attention to feeling it. The wobble in the wood will be the same as the wobble you can hear. When you retune the guitar to perfect standard, this wobble in the wood will slow down too. And that concludes Advanced tuning! That's as perfect as you can get it with the ear (if it's a well-trained ear! ). This type of resonant tuning will also greatly improve your trained ear.
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#13
Quote by Metatron
That's exactly what I meant ChordProgressiv. You can do it with a guitar, I've seen it done.

Logz, I am looking for types of tuning not included in that lesson, I've read it before. I know how to harmonic tune. I've got perfect pitch, and am annoied to hell when things aren't in tune with one another. So to me, it does sound amazing.

There are more advanced types of tuning, based on sound theory that make strings vibrate and resonate off one another differently, and I was just wondering if anyone knew any of those methods. I have had a hard time finding any on google.


After you learn how, please post about it!

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#14
Nonono, Logz not the resonant way of tuning. Resonant tuning patterns.

For example, there are mathmatical ways to tune your guitar, I suppose you would call it a form of open tuning, that make your string do some crazy sh*t. I knew a guy who did this crap all the time, before I started playing guitar, but unfortunitly he's since moved away.

He would tune his guitar based on mathmatical theory. I don't remember how exactly he did it, but there's a way to, for example tune your guitar to all prime numbers and it sounds totally crazy. And there's a way to tune it to the Fibonacci Sequence. There's also a way to tune twelve strings to opposites....I just don't know how to do it.

I guess people on here don't really know what I'm talking about...so after I find out how it works I'll post a lesson.