#1
How Do You Work Out A Major Keys Corresponding Minor?

Its as simple as that lol for example i know C's relative is A Minor but how do you work that out.

Thanks
#2
C majors (ionian) 6th mode is A minor (aeolion). So basically, CDEFGABC (C major) contains the same notes as ABCDEFGA (A minor), therefore, you get relative minor.
#3
The major scale's 6th is what the relative minor is. For example, G major. GABCDEF#G. The 6th of Gmajor is E, so the relative minor of Gmajor is Eminor.
Oh crap!
#5
Quote by jshep100
How Do You Work Out A Major Keys Corresponding Minor? Its as simple as that lol for example i know C's relative is A Minor but how do you work that out. Thanks
Some kind folks have already answered your question, but perhaps this little graphic will help you, too.
All things are difficult before they are easy.
- Dr. Thomas Fuller (British physician, 1654-1734)
Quote by Freepower
For everything you need to know - gpb0216.
#6
Quote by gpb0216
Some kind folks have already answered your question, but perhaps this little graphic will help you, too.


Can you please explain that a little bit.. I just don't get the circle of fifths!!
#7
Do you think its worth learning the minor keys or as long as i know how to work it out when i need it will that be alright?

Thanks again
#8
Quote by jshep100
Do you think its worth learning the minor keys or as long as i know how to work it out when i need it will that be alright? Thanks again
Knowing how to work it out is certainly a good thing, but I urge you to drill them into your mind until they pop up without any effort at all.
Quote by ifeastonbums
Can you please explain that a little bit.. I just don't get the circle of fifths!!
The Perfect Fifth (P5) is the third-most fundamental musical interval (3:2). Only the Unison (1:1) and Octave (2:1) are more fundamental. There's no need to worry if you don't understand the ratios. I just ask you to accept for now that the P5 is an interval with a massive influence on all things musical.

I probably should have sent this thread's readers directly to this Co5 lesson instead of just posting the graphic from the lesson.

After you read the lesson please come back with questions and we'll drill as deeply as you like.

gpb
All things are difficult before they are easy.
- Dr. Thomas Fuller (British physician, 1654-1734)
Quote by Freepower
For everything you need to know - gpb0216.
Last edited by gpb0216 at Jul 9, 2006,