#1
I am a rookie guitarist exploring the wonderful world of music notation and i am having trouble with my flats. I have no problem with sharps. Usually what i do is when ever i see a flat i just think of the next note down in sharp(except if its natural). Is this the right thing to do? Any other ways to look at it? What are really good exersises that i can do do help with reading the notes?
#2
Personally I like to think of each note enharmonically, meaning I like to think of both names for em.

But I have some tendencies, you know, as far as naming goes. If it's in parentheses, it can be called that but I never ever say it, for one reason or another)

A
Bb (A#)
B
C
C# / Db
D
Eb (D#)
E
F
F# (Gb)
G
Ab (G#)

Meaning, I never say A# or Gb, just the ones I listed.

It's wierd... I know.
#4
anybody who plays string instruments prefers sharps over flats.

are you talking about reading them on the treble clef? i just always remembered with one flat play B flat, two flats play E flat and B flat...so on and so forth. the circle of fifths will help you with that. somebody posted the link above me.
#5
Quote by pratt121
Personally I like to think of each note enharmonically, meaning I like to think of both names for em.
.


Thats how i remember them too, and it's worked for me.
Especially in music class.
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#6
i am talking about using flats in general. Give me a bigger example of the strategy you use on the treble clef.
#7
Quote by Burdell
are you talking about reading them on the treble clef? i just always remembered with one flat play B flat, two flats play E flat and B flat...so on and so forth.
Ever noticed how badly that fails when you see them as accidentals and not as part of the key signature?

Unless you're sight reading it doesn't matter how you figure out what the notes are, honestly. If you're trying to figure something out in notation and it's wrtten A# and you think "That's the same as Bb" that's fine. Nobody gives a crap, or even knows, unless you're doing some theory stuff where it actually matters.

When you're sight reading, the game changes... you really shouldn't be thinking about what the notes are at all, and you should be thinking in terms of interval between the notes. Mentally naming each note when you sight read is just too damned slow.
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#8
the use depends on the scale your using. If you think about say the scale of F:

F G A Bb C D E F

thats how it would be written. But if you made the B into an A# then it would be:

F G A A# C D E F

now you have 2 A's(even if 1 is sharp) when you write it on a clef it will go straight up, plateau for 2 notes, and then go up again instead of going up in 1 straight line like it should. thats why there is a variance in when ppl use sharp and flats, its to make the scale look neat. So you should eally be thinking of the note as part of a scale, not as an individual note, so you should read it as how it is written.
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