#1
There is a classical style, called flamenco, and i've been working on it for a while now, but it is VERY hard. Is anyone familiar with this style?
#2
yeah...well kinda...i know its spanish

and i know that they have a special guitar for it...which leads me to my question here kinda...whats the difference between a flemenco guitar and a regular acoustic?
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#4
I'm actually trying to learn some now, i'm getting a lot more into it.
God, those guys who play super fast are so effing good.
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#5
I think it's just that people play flamenco on a classical acoustic (nylon stringed) instead of a normal acoustic but I don't really know
#6
eh...idk...my spanish teacher said something about there being a special guitar...
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#7
Flamenco guitars are nylon stringed acoustics with slightly different shaped bodies than your regular classical guitars, if I'm right.

Flamenco is hard...That's all there is to it.

Properly played Flamenco (think Paco de Lucia) is amazing and beautiful. People have cried at his concerts because of the emotion in his music.
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#8
flamenco spanish style stuff there is always that guy Estaban!and classical stuff cause they use the finger picking techniques Andres Segovia
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#9
Any special songs from Paco de Lucia that anyone suggests?
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#10
Quote by Fleabass5
Any special songs from Paco de Lucia that anyone suggests?


Check out the song Mediterranean Sundance played by Al Di Meola, John Mclaughlin, and Paco De Lucia. It is considered one of the trio's best songs, I also suggest learning the basics of the song as its a great introduction to jazz/flamenco guitar playing.

Here is a link to them performing it live on YouTube:

http://youtube.com/watch?v=HEZrB_FDw4c&search=al%20di%20meola

EDIT: That version of the live performance is a bit out of sync in the recording, but you can find a better recorded version on YouTube.
Last edited by brendan666 at Jul 8, 2006,
#11
Flemenco guitars also have a thin "plate" on them because of this technique associated with tapping the face of the guitar.
#12
Paco

yeah it's fantastic. i love spanish guitar, i want to learn it quite badly. does anybody know of a flamenco teacher in the Long Island, NY area? or a website that is good for finding teachers, because the sites i've seen aren't very good.
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#13
Yeah I've taken a few lessons in it. My guitar teacher lent me a good book for starting on it. It's real cool and tricky. The hardest thing for me was always the quick i-m-i-m runs. My alternating wasn't too quick (still isn't).

And in response to the thin plate thing, the technique is "toque" with the fingers and "golpe" with the thumb. I think...
#14
Quote by brendan666
Check out Paco De Lucia and Al Di Meola. While Al Di Meola has more of an acoustic jazz style to his playing, they both have elements of flamenco.


I think Al Di Meola is more fusion than flamenco.

Paco is good, although I think some purists of different genres get a little mad because he dips into classical and jazz. Still, he is technically very good (I've heard he can reach 18 nps fingerpicked) and supposedly he couldn't read music for the first thirty or so years of playing.
#15
Flemenco guitars also have a thin "plate" on them because of this technique associated with tapping the face of the guitar.


Yea. They actually use it almost as... a percussion item. And it is sooo hard to get the patterns down with your fingers. There is a certain order you hit the strings in with your fingers.

Yea, a flamenco guitar looks like a classical acoustic, but with a thinner body, and a metal plate.
#16
Yeah, it is very cool sounding when you hear it played along witht the flamenco dancing in Spain. I twas suprised at how enjoyable it was.
The skill level involved in the guitar playing was retty cool, and the guitarist was amazing, it was great.
#17
i can do PRMI right hand pretty well. not sloppy about... 100bpm 16th notes, but with only 90%ish accuracy, about 160ish bpm 16ths
#18
Flamenco is apart of the spanish culture, it requires a nylon stringed guitar, there's flamenco guitars but a classical would do fine. although classical isnt built to be tapped on, with all the flamenco techniques and all. i'm quite familiar with flamenco, i hang out with alot of flamenco players. you guys should think twice about flamenco, its not easy at all. you got to be patient, it takes alot of time, you must be serious about it to be able to play it. i prefer to you guys FLAMENCO GUITAR METHOD BY HERHARD GRAF-MARTINEZ, it breaks down all the techniques for you so you could play flamenco. the difference between flamenco guitar and acoustic is the fretboard is much wider, more spaced out because fingerpicking is a big key to it. the body has more shape to it, more round, like a bean. thats all, i hope you guys are serious about flamenco, its truely beautiful.
#19
ohhhhhhh so i have a flemenco guitar....and all this time i tot it was just some crap nylon stringed one.............hmph.......my sister bot it for me from turkey so it cod b or it codnt b??
#20
Interesting fact: Ukuleles were invented when Spanish explorers/invaders travelling to South America needed a smaller, more portable Spanish guitar that they could bring on board ship with them

More on topic, am I right in thinking Flamenco is largely Phrygian-based?
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