#1
ive started experimenting with perfect pitch, hearing a note and knowing what it is. So far identify any natural note after hearing a Low C (im using a piano)

does anyone who have learned perfect pitch know any good ways to practice
Member of the Frank Zappa Fan Club, PM deadhead313313

People Wouldn't know good music if it hit them in face
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#2
that's relative pitch dude, you're learning intervals, perfect pitch is being able to hear any note at any time of the day and say what it is. you can also hear and make music in your head and stuff. apparently it's impossible to achieve and you have to be born with it, however, there is a program available from most guitar magazines called perfect pitch by david lucas burge, it's like $140 but i found it on limewire free, i tried it for a few weeks but couldn't make the time, it supposedly takes a few months, anyways you might want to look into it
#3
There's a lot of debate on whether perfect pitch is natural, whether you can learn it, whether it exists at all... I've never met anyone with it. However, what you are learning is relative pitch, which is still a very important skill.

Here is a column on Identifying Intervals. If you get good at relative pitch, you can still work out the intervals of a melody on the radio or in your head, and then all you have to do is find the root on your guitar.
#4
I've sort of developed something like perfect pitch, but it's so far from it that I wouldn't even consider it half-assed pitch.
My friend was playing all of these open chords one day, and I was naming them like crazy. But those are chords, so I doubt that counts. Still, it was kinda neat, though... I think...
I'm sure if you sat down and listened to just notes after notes for a long, long time, you'd eventually develop perfect pitch. It seems like it'd take an unnecessary amount of time, though. Still, it's cool that you're trying to learn it yourself, so keep at it. And that's also how I advise you to practice: keep... at... it...
Good luck.
#5
^ Well, that's not as much perfect pitch as it is you have a memory of things you play a lot on your instrument. A lot of wind players I know can sing from memory the notes the usually use for tuning, and in guitar you might remember things like your low E, or in this case open chords.

Half assed-pitch.... haha
#6
Quote by psychodelia
^ Well, that's not as much perfect pitch as it is you have a memory of things you play a lot on your instrument. A lot of wind players I know can sing from memory the notes the usually use for tuning, and in guitar you might remember things like your low E, or in this case open chords.

Yep, that's exactly what I do. I usually relate a D chord to the opening of "Brain Damage" by Pink Floyd, an Em chord to the interlude of "Master of Puppets", etc. So I can see how playing guitar can have that effect on me.
#7
does anyone know methods to get it,
Member of the Frank Zappa Fan Club, PM deadhead313313

People Wouldn't know good music if it hit them in face
- Frank Zappa

Gear:
Carvin CT3
Digitech GNX3
Peavey Classic 30
#8
Quote by RHDIII
does anyone know methods to get it,

Just listen to a lot of music, I guess. Do what I do, and relate each note or chord to a song you know a lot and like. Like, few people really know a C by heart, but if you go through the opening part to Vivaldi's "Spring" from "The Four Seasons", once you hit the cadence of the opening you know you've got a C right there.
Just stuff like that will help you out; kind of like acronyms help you remember historical events and stuff like that... I don't know, it might not work for you. Works wonders for me, though.
#9
yea that should help.

one thing i overlooked thats been talked alot are knowing pitches from other things and relating the sounds you hear to this (open strings, songs ect.)

that should help anything else
Member of the Frank Zappa Fan Club, PM deadhead313313

People Wouldn't know good music if it hit them in face
- Frank Zappa

Gear:
Carvin CT3
Digitech GNX3
Peavey Classic 30
#10
You can take a test for it online here:

http://perfectpitch.ucsf.edu/ppstudy.html

Back in music school they identified me as supposedly having it (perfect pitch).

I took the above test and passed it, altho they haven't contacted me. Maybe they put me into the half-assed pitch category, ha.

But trust me, its really a pretty useless trait. Kind of an idiot savant thing. (think Rain Man)

Relative pitch is much more important, especially if you play by ear like most guitarists do. And relative pitch can be learned, despite the claims of that Burge guy, I'm not so sure about being able to "learn" perfect pitch.

Here's a quote from a veteran user in another forum that I really agree with:

"Of all the great, amazing musicians I know, they all have impeccable relative pitch. Of the ones I've know with perfect pitch, some have been very good, while other have been total musical dunces. Relative pitch is vastly more useful and easier to train than perfect pitch."
#11
Quote by psychodelia
I've never met anyone with it.


when you do, a fit of rage and jealousy will overcome you


but seriously my lead singer with it pisses me off. maybe because he's letting it go to waste a bit with his style of guitar

aka: the BAD kind of shred.