#1
It's simple. What scales have you found that work the best with metal lead guitar? Maybe a little bit why and where or how you use them too, just for good measure.


For me, I used to stick to minor pentatonic just cause it's one of the most common, but now i look for any variant of that scale or even a totally different one like diminished or something. Also, I really like Aeolian alot. I'll sometimes switch from pentatonic to this just because it's so similar, yet it gives a new flaor to the solo. Other favorites include harmonic minor, blues scale, and phrygian too. that's all i really got, so...anything to add?
#2
Harmonic minor scale is great for getting a classical kind of sound (more along the lines of neoclassical than metal, but that all depends on how you use it).
Rig

Jackson DK2M -> ISP Decimator -> Peavey 6505 Combo
#3
i agree, harmonic minor is a good pick. also, minor pentatonic with some notes altered a half step, i just forget which ones
on a topic of how you would like to be buried...

Quote by Jacob6293
in a coffin, underground, next to my wife.


Quote by tylerishot
Me too. But only if she's alive.


#4
Hungarian minor is just.... EVIL sounding. Especially with loads of gain. Harmonic minor has already been mentioned, but used properly, you can get some freakin' sweet stuff out of that.
#5
Quote by Fargalas
Hungarian minor is just.... EVIL sounding. Especially with loads of gain. Harmonic minor has already been mentioned, but used properly, you can get some freakin' sweet stuff out of that.


EEK! I forgot about that one, very creepy indeed

Fits well with more gothic kinds of metal.
Rig

Jackson DK2M -> ISP Decimator -> Peavey 6505 Combo
#6
yes, i do believe some very twisted sounds have come out of my amp when i improv along the harm. minor scale. I first heard it in the end of "creeping death" by metallica and then was like, "wow, that's a really kickass sound that had!" and all kirk did was go up to the second octave G from the root E and then all the way back down in stragiht eights...point being that's all it took for this scale to impress me. what else is great is that if u use it after minor pent. on the latter part of a key change then it catches the listener by surprise very well.

hungarian minor? i'll check it out. thx.
#7
i'd just like to comment on why in the hell there are like 3 diff names for alot of scales. lol. i was looking at this scale called neopolitan minor and was going to reccomend it cuz it looked interesting, when i took a second glance and saw it was phrygian. down to the last note. is it because neopolitan regularly is it's own scale but you change this interval to that and all of a sudden it's phrygian? ...i guess that'd make some sense. it's late and i'm answering my own questions....wow. peace bitches!
#8
Night Lights found a while back the scales that Nile use in their guitar (and if you are not familiar with Nile, shame on you!)

Quote by Night_Lights
"The Double Harmonic Minor, the diminished, 5th mode Harmonic Minor, Phrygian, The Byzantine, The Snake Charmer, Hirojoshi, Kumoi, Hungarian Minor all see lots of action."


And none of us knew what the Snake Charmer is, I'm afraid.
#10
could anyone direct me to a site with harmonic minor scales
TY
My Guitar
>Ibanez RG7620 (7 string)

Originally Posted by Outside Octaves
... ah, the bliss of ignorience!
#11
Quote by 5150)Ed(5150
could anyone direct me to a site with harmonic minor scales
TY

Gladly.
Also, recently my two favorites have been Phrygian Major and Chinese.
And, although it's not the most "metal" scale there is, the Hirajoshi is one of the most badass-sounding scales I've ever heard. Marty Friedman uses a lot of Japanese scales like that.
#12
i've stayed away from the oriental scales like that cuz honestly, i wouldn't know how to use them in real situtations. i'd be able to improv in my own time fine with it, but once i'd go to a band practice, i wouldn't know how to apply it to the heavy metal **** we play. i'm not that good yet, i guess. lol.
#13
^The trick is to either play really fast over the non-tonic notes, or to just practice using them over backing tracks.
Every atom belonging to me as good belongs to you
#14
Quote by Kutanmoogle
^The trick is to either play really fast over the non-tonic notes, or to just practice using them over backing tracks.


Well that's a personal decision, I personally love just sitting on the b9 for a bit to get that tension before resolving to the tonic.

For any who are wondering, if you have any phrygian-type scale (as in, one with a minor 2nd), you can obviously get a lot of tension by playing the b2 or b9, since they are a half-step away from the root.
#15
Quote by psychodelia
Night Lights found a while back the scales that Nile use in their guitar (and if you are not familiar with Nile, shame on you!)


And none of us knew what the Snake Charmer is, I'm afraid.



i think the snake charmer is the nickname of a well known scale. Phrygian dominant maybe?
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