#1
please don't shout at me coz this is probably a stupid question, but i wanted to know

if you tune your guitar so it's halfway between standard tuning and being tuned to flats, when you play a C, could you call it a B#?
#2
depends on the key you're playing in.
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#3
Well, wouldn't it be B# and 50 cents?
- FJ

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#4
no thats called out of tune. b sharp is c.
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#5
It'd be... what... a demi-semi step between B and C (as B to C is a semi step)? Does that note have a name? I think those steps are used in eastern music, but not in western

Then again, I could be way wrong
#6
Quote by =ToM=
if you tune your guitar so it's halfway between standard tuning and being tuned to flats, when you play a C, could you call it a B#?

No. Sharps and flats still require a half step. However, B#/Cb does exist (as does E#/Fb) in the context of scales, since note names can't repeat, so if a scale had C and C# in it, it would be called B#-C#.
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#7
b# and c are called enharmonic (meaning they sound the same, its more so dependant upon the key) and depending on the key you're playing in C may be notated as b#, in other words, what you're considering is out of tune (tuning the guitar all funky) , however there is an E# and B# it just depends on the key you're in.
#8
yeah, B sharp is just the same note as C. it doesn't matter how you tune your guitar, you can't just make a new note and call it B sharp. If you're playing a B sharp, you're playing a C
#9
OMG, I'm such an idiot. I'm obviously not in my guitar theory mode today. It would be B and 50 cents. And no, it's not necessarily out of tune. Dimebag was known to tune down 10 or 20 cents.
- FJ

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#10
and mathamology i think what you're referring to is called semitones, sitars use these..... there are semitonal scales and whole tone scales (if i remember correctly, if not maybe someone knowledgeable can correct me)
#11
and btw don't listen to flying jew, he's either joking around to f#ck w/ you or has no clue what he's talking about (and btw dimebag would tune down either half a step or a full step, not 10 or 20 cents or whatever the hell that is.....)
#12
No, I've heard that he tuned down between half steps (which are called cents). 100 cents to a half step I believe.
- FJ

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#13
flying jew knows what he's talking about, but misunderstood the question. B# is enharmonic with C, B and 50 cents is half way between B and B#(C) and has no letter name other than B and 50 cents. It is possible to tune a guitar down 10 or 20 cents, but its not really practical and would be barely noticable to the human ear.
#14
Quote by GumbyEater
flying jew knows what he's talking about, but misunderstood the question. B# is enharmonic with C, B and 50 cents is half way between B and B#(C) and has no letter name other than B and 50 cents. It is possible to tune a guitar down 10 or 20 cents, but its not really practical and would be barely noticable to the human ear.


Barely noticable if you're tone deaf, many guitarist can tell that they're 20 cents off. I know i can.
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#15
Quote by Mathamology
It'd be... what... a demi-semi step between B and C (as B to C is a semi step)? Does that note have a name? I think those steps are used in eastern music, but not in western

Then again, I could be way wrong

quarter tones
#16
like funky said, it depends what key your in.
B# and C may be the same pitch wise, but they are different theorectially wise.
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#18
Quote by Funky P
Barely noticable if you're tone deaf, many guitarist can tell that they're 20 cents off. I know i can.


20 cents off is a ton!
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#19
Quote by Dirk Gently
No. Sharps and flats still require a half step. However, B#/Cb does exist (as does E#/Fb) in the context of scales, since note names can't repeat, so if a scale had C and C# in it, it would be called B#-C#.
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Looks like you know what your talkin about... cause you = wrong

Sometimes you will see a b# im busic, because the composer doesn't feel like effecting the C, you can see this happen with E# = F
#20
Why are they different theoretically? I don''t understand this. I do understand that they have the same pitch, but how can they be different in theory. Maybe an example would help me out.
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#21
My music teacher said that you can occasionally run into things like: F## or Abb, which I don't understand too well. It involves music theory patterns and sequences, which I'm not educated in yet. (Still learning the major and minor modes)
- FJ

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#22
Quote by =ToM=
please don't shout at me coz this is probably a stupid question, but i wanted to know

if you tune your guitar so it's halfway between standard tuning and being tuned to flats, when you play a C, could you call it a B#?

no no notes would have a regular note name
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#23
Quote by flyingjew34
My music teacher said that you can occasionally run into things like: F## or Abb, which I don't understand too well. It involves music theory patterns and sequences, which I'm not educated in yet. (Still learning the major and minor modes)

that happens in augmented and diminished chords to stay in the same key
f##=G and Abb=G as well
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#25
it's just that i had a bet with my friends i could play a B# chord, and i was just wonderin how
#26
Play a C chord.
- FJ

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#27
Quote by shorter_rocker
Sometimes you will see a b# im busic, because the composer doesn't feel like effecting the C, you can see this happen with E# = F

Umm...if that made sense I might agree that I was wrong...
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