#1
Hi everyone. I am trying to understand transposing instruments and their purpose. I think I kind of get it, but I would like some of UG's knowledgable musicians make sure I know what I'm talking about

I am reading the wiki article at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Transposing_instrument , and now am looking at the list at the bottom, of instruments and how/if they transpose.

Let's take "Instruments in Bb (sounds a major second below what is written)" for example. If I play a trumpet, and see on my sheet music no ket signature (denoting key of C) a note on the treble clef on the second space from the top - C - and I play that note correctly, the pitch my instrument produces is actually a major second lower than that? Meaning if I were next to an electronic tuner, it would flash "Bb"?

Assuming that is correct, what would one have to do read trumpet music and actually play in the key of C major? Would one have to have that music transposed into the correct key that is NOT C major, so when one plays the notes written, they sound the pitches of the C major scale (ignoring accidentals for the moment!), not the notes of the key signature which is actually written on the music?

Sorry if I muddled that horribly, and thanks for reading
#2
It's easier than it seems at first, just reverse your thinking.

Right now: The sounding pitch is a major second lower.
What you should think: The written pitch is a major second higher.

Now figure out what key you want your written pitch to be in, relative to what it should sound like (and not the other way around). Thus if you want your trumpets in C, you would write them in D.
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#3
the first part sounds right, and being a trumpet player im stuck in this situation all the time, to play the music in the key of concert C (c major on guitar,indicates the true pitch is C, as opposed to a C on a trumpet) i would have to play the trumpet it the key of D major, one whole step up
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#4
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Assuming that is correct, what would one have to do read trumpet music and actually play in the key of C major? Would one have to have that music transposed into the correct key that is NOT C major, so when one plays the notes written, they sound the pitches of the C major scale (ignoring accidentals for the moment!), not the notes of the key signature which is actually written on the music?Sorry if I muddled that horribly, and thanks for reading
If you are reading from an arrangement then it will already be transposed for you by the arranger so you just play as it is written.
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