#1
How is it that the major scale is the beginning of all. Someone please explain that to me. Plus how do you know a scale is like, a D major or something like that.
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#2
the beginning of all what? but the first note you play in a major scale (the root note) is the scale youre playing and all major scales follow the same pattern of whole, whole, half, whole, whole, whole, half step
#3
^
Not quite.
The root note is usually the lowest pitched note i think.
Every set of notes fit into a particular scale best. You use those notes to find the scale, the same way you work out what a chord is (after all, chords are based on scales).

Corwinoid, SD, redwing etc will be able to explain it alot better than me.


Im not sure why its the start of everything. But to me it seems logical to have it as a base.

Intervals for everything else are based off the major scale, and i think in theory, alot of things revolve around the major scale.

Take a minor triad for example.
Its intervals are 1 b3 5 right? this is because these intervals are related to the major scale (hence the b3).

If you took the Aeolian mode, and constructed a minor triad from that, you would get the intervals 1 3 5 (similar to the major triad), which would make it confusing. Do you mean minor or major triad?

So i guess having one, basic, universal scale as your starting point for everything is the best idea.
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Last edited by Logz at Jul 11, 2006,
#4
a major scale is based on this set of intervals

W W H W W W H etc...

and it's the beginning of all because every other mode is related back to this scale, or as modifications as some may say...and you know it's D major when you read up on the circle of fifths

here - http://www.ultimate-guitar.com/lessons/the_basics/the_circle_of_fifths_music_theory_for_dummies.html

and here's for major scales in general - http://www.ultimate-guitar.com/lessons/scales/major_scales_explained.html

all here on UG, take a gander at the lessons before posting
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#5
Quote by axe_grinder247

all here on UG, take a gander at the lessons before posting


Just because theres a lesson about it, it doesnt mean everyone will understand it.
If everyone did that, there'd be no point in the MT forum.
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#6
Quote by Logz
Just because theres a lesson about it, it doesnt mean everyone will understand it.
If everyone did that, there'd be no point in the MT forum.


but it would be easier to look at the lesson and point out the parts you don't understand in MT instead of asking about a subject as broad as major scales...it may be much more difficult to achieve an answer as in-depth as a full lesson
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#7
Well, some people will find that a question will be answered better to their situation in MT than a lesson.

And things in music seem to revolve around the major scale a lot of the time, but the reason; I do not know. Like Logz said, wait for redwing_suck, SD, or Corwinoid.
#9
Basically, the major scale is used as a way to describe other scales, so if someone says a scale has a b3, b6 and b7 that is relative to the major scale.
#10
I think the question was meant to be why does all music (modes etc.) seem to be based around the major scale.

Originally i don't think it all was early music (monks chanting etc.) was largely modal and precussive and didn't base around scales but rather around modal intervals.
#12
in all the theory i read, i understood as determining the root note to be the chord or note which the song resolves to in a consonant sound, not necessarily the lowest note.

such as in a simple progression

F# minor, A major, E major, D major

the root would be F# minor, not E major (even though E major would be the lowest open chord available on a guitar) the order and movement would resolve back to F# minor (try it yourself and see, use A or E major after the D major and see if the song sounds as though it comes to an end)
#13
Major scales are considered the basis for everything due to the early adjusments to music made by the church composers. The interval of the third (major third) was considered "holy" and "right", so that interval was used to create their harmonies. The scale developed and was considered the most holy of all the modes (major scale being Ionian mode). Later, the minor scale was developed for more somber music, and harmonic and melodic minor scales were developed to help church singers sing the difficult foreign intervals associated with the minor keys. The other modes (Dorian, Phrygian, Locrian, Lydian, and Mixolydian) are all variations on the major and minor scale. They all developed because church composers wanted certain "colors" in their music. Because of popular culture, most music that is recorded and sold on the market in the rock, country, rap, hip-hop, punk, etc. genres is either in major or minor keys.
Root chords (or tonic chords) are usually (stress on usually) found as either the first or last chord of the song. That will tell you the majority of the time the key you are in, and what scale to play from. If your song starts with a G major chord, then you can use the G major scale for leads, the G major pentatonic scale, or even e minor because they share the same key signature (and the e minor and G major pentatonic are the exact same scale, just starting on different notes). Some songs don't end on the tonic chord, and some songs don't begin on the tonic chord, so look to the chorus for the chord that might designate the key center. Choruses almost always start and end with the tonic chord.