#1
Here is my project: Big Red . It's a double-cutaway with tune-o-matic bridge, Seymour-Duncan Pearly Gates humbuckers, DPDT switches to change from parallel to series, a 3-way switch and 2-V, 2-T controls.

It's got a maple neck, alder body with lace wood top. It's semi-solid body because there are routered voids in the alder under the lace wood. The picture doesn't do justice to the tiger-eye that I got on the top by sanding red stain down and rubbing alcohol-based auburn stain in, which produced a gold finish on the lighter parts of the lace wood.

The knobs, pickups and tuners will be black.

It's got the fretboard masked and ready for lacquer. More later.
Attachments:
DSCN2061w.JPG
It's better to burn out,
'cause rust never sleeps...
Last edited by DoctorD at Jul 12, 2006,
#5
Give it gold hardware man! Gold + red = gettin' lots of tail.
Will says:
DON'T FEAR THE REAPER!
- SmarterChild - says:
I don't know if I can help it.

Member #6 of the "I play my guitar as high as Tom Morello does" club
#7
Here is a close-up of the body after a good coat of lacquer. I like the idea of gold hardware, but does it mean that you're gettin' lots of tail, or will it increase your chances of getting lots of tail? Scroll down to see my Zebra guitar, which used gold hardware, but there wasn't any red.
Attachments:
DSCN2076.jpg
It's better to burn out,
'cause rust never sleeps...
Last edited by DoctorD at Jul 14, 2006,
#8
I bought the neck from Carvin; it is double-reinforced maple with an ebony fret board. The neck comes straight off the body so the bridge is inset about 1/4 inch. This is how Carvin builds a lot of their solid-tail guitars that I have seen. Yes, the strings go through the body. On my previous guitar the sunken bridge and through-body strings seem to help the sustain and tone, even though it was a bolt-on neck.

I glued the alder boards to either side of the neck piece and then routered the neck piece even with the top of the boards and glued 1/4 inch thick lace wood boards on top. I had to use three pieces because the boards that I found weren't wide enough for two. I overlapped the neck piece about 1/8 inch on either side with the strip down the center.

D

My previous guitar was The Zebra, topped with zebra wood and a bolt-on Fender-style neck (maple/cherry). This picture makes the peghead look lighter than it is.
Attachments:
the_zebra.GIF
It's better to burn out,
'cause rust never sleeps...
Last edited by DoctorD at Jul 14, 2006,
#9
DoctorD - Ok, on the first pic the bridge rout looked way to deep and I was concerned. Yeah, the more string contact with the body the more sustain you will always have. Also you're the guy who did the zebrawood top. What was your base wood on that and how does the sustain with zebrawood compare to flame maple?
#10
Yeah, I built the Zebra. It's about 5/16 inch thick over alder, so the bridge, which is set a bit deeper because I routed the neck pocket extra deep to get better coupling there, sets deeper than it will on the double cutaway--but I didn't have to route completely through the zebra wood, which was good.

Zebra wood is really hard. I ran a piece through my planer against the grain and it shattered into a million pieces. You can sand it smooth as glass, but it's also just about impossible to stain. After trying several times I just went with lacquer. I think the zebra wood gives it more sustain. I really like playing it and the Seymour Duncan vintage humbuckers give it a nice tone. If you hit a low note fairly hard you can feel the top resonating. A thicker laminate of zebra wood might give even better resonance, a la Brian May's solid oak red guitar, but I was worried about it getting too heavy.

I may build one with zebra wood and build the neck as well, and angle it, using zebra wood on the peg head as well.

D
It's better to burn out,
'cause rust never sleeps...
#11
It's finished! I buffed it this weekend and fired it up. The Pearly Gates pickups kick ass. Check out how the gold comes out of the lace wood with different lighting.

I learned a few lessons on this one, mostly to better position controls and how to get the most out of woods with stain--this was my first attempt at using multiple colors.

The two switches are to change the pickups from humbucker to single coil, and with the 3-way switch and two volumes and tones you can get just about whatever tone you want. I just need to put on the strap knobs and start jamming.
Attachments:
DSCN2124w2.jpg
It's better to burn out,
'cause rust never sleeps...
Last edited by DoctorD at Jul 24, 2006,
#17
Quote by call1800ksmyazz
The body style with those knobs and switches make it look like an Alembic a little bit.

Not enough switches