#1
I can't figure out what scale or mode walsh is using in rocky mountain way. There are a lot of passing tones i think that are throwing me off..thanks for the help
#4
Its an E major scale with a flat seventh. If you want to get technical you could say its mixolydian mode. Or since he hardly ever hits the second degree of the scale (the F# note) in that solo you could say its minor pentatonic but where third is always raised so its major.

Call it whatever you want, The main thing is the third degree of the scale is major not minor, if you hit G notes instead of G# it'll sound off.

Cuz he's playing slide of course, probably in slide tuning? and he's got that common slide thing going where its like the A shape on the 2nd 3rd and 4th strings. So right there you've got that major third sound on the 2nd string when its played together with the 3rd string.

And the flat seventh note (D) is really important too, esp since the solo is over the chord progression D E
#5
<<Or since he hardly ever hits the second degree of the scale (the F# note) in that solo you could say its minor pentatonic but where third is always raised so its major.>>

oops ignore this it doesn't make sense, the F# is part of the D chord! so he's hitting that note all the time, doh
#6
I figured the song out by ear with a slide in standard tuning..i dunno if he plays in it or not. Its just a wierd scale cuz even in the mixolydain mode u still have notes not accounted for..C A# and (i think) G. But i guess thats rock music breakn the rules..
#7
I listened to it just now, here's my take on those notes you mentioned:

C: the only C note I hear in the song is the slide guitar riffing in the bkgd of the chorus, as it slides into the A chord. is that what you're thinking of? I don't hear any C note in either solo. if the former is what you're thinking of, that would just be the sound of the three notes in the A chord (A,C#, E) being slid into from below, so at some point during the slide you'll hear Ab/C/Eb instead

A# and G I hear a lot of during the solo. The G would be the b3 and the A# would be the "blue" note in the E blues scale. So yeah, hard call as to whether you would say the solos are in E mixolydian or E blues. I think maybe that's a good example of why its important not to get too hung up on scale names? just think more in terms of you got 12 tones to work with, dont' just limit yourself to 7 (or 5).... IOW you know the sound of a b3 to a 3, or a #4 (blue note) to 5....

p.s. even tho I'm not a slide player, I would bet the farm that he's in slide tuning. You got those telltale signs on the first and second strings, the sound of both strings fretted (or whatever the heck you call it when the slide is over the appropriate spot on fret) and they're making the sound of a major 3rd with a fifth on top, IOW the 3 and 5 of the scale, or chord, or whatever. Anyway and those two scale degrees are being slid into and back and forth from two frets below, i.e. the 2 and 4 of the scale or chord or whatever. Hmm this probably makes no sense whatsoever but whatever you call it, I know the sound of it and what it looks like and its a real common slide lick.
#8
p.s. when I say this:

"C: the only C note I hear in the song is the slide guitar riffing in the bkgd of the chorus, as it slides into the A chord"

I mean its happening all the time, he's doing little licks sliding back and forth into and out of the A shapeon the neck throughout the two bars of the A chord in each chorus.