#1
hey im having a bit of trouble with 6/8 time what are whole notes half notes quarter notes and 8th notes worth per beat in 6/8 time any help is appreciated
if hes so smart how come hes dead
#2
the 8 means one beat is represented by an eighth note. there are six eighth notes per bar, or 3 quarter notes, or 1 dotted half note. the bottom number refers to the note value used to represent one beat. 4=4th note, 8=8th note, 16=16th note
#3
stuff crap like that i dont read music you dont need to really but it probbaly is useful i dont get any of that junk :P
- tommy
#4
You wouldn't see a whole note, that would be 8 beats (more than a measure). Rather for the equivalent you'd see a dotted half note tied to a quarter note in the next measure.

Dotted half note = 6 beats
Half note = 4 beats
Dotted quarter note = 3 beats
Quarter note = 2 beats
Eighth note = 1 beat

-SD
#5
Quote by tombomb22
stuff crap like that i dont read music you dont need to really but it probbaly is useful i dont get any of that junk.
Good luck with your deeper musical studies.
All things are difficult before they are easy.
- Dr. Thomas Fuller (British physician, 1654-1734)
Quote by Freepower
For everything you need to know - gpb0216.
#6
if you are ever having trouble with a time signature, just remember that the top number is how many beats are in the measure and the bottom number is what note gets the beat

ex.

6/8 time - 6 beats per measure, 8th note gets the beat

4/4 time - 4 beats per measure, Quarter note gets the beat
ToNY
#7
I know someone who learned how to play Beethoven's "Fur Elise" blisteringly fast on piano, but NEVER noticed that it was in 6/8 time until I pointed it out to him. He was playing it as if it were 3/4 time.
Hi, I'm Peter
#8
i'm having a bit of trouble myself. I have heard that 'shine on you crazy diamond' was in 9/12, but I may be wrong. and there is no such thing as a 12th note in standard notation.
#9
Quote by Tonster714
if you are ever having trouble with a time signature, just remember that the top number is how many beats are in the measure and the bottom number is what note gets the beat

ex.

6/8 time - 6 beats per measure, 8th note gets the beat

4/4 time - 4 beats per measure, Quarter note gets the beat

WRONG!

in 6/8 time the eighth note does not get the beat. the dotted quarter note gets the beat. 6/8 is compound time, so it is counted differently from normal time. heres a short thing i typed up on compound time so that hopefully you will understand it better:

compound time
basicly, there are two times of time, simple and compound. compound is when the top number is greater than three and also divisible by three. that means things like 6/8 or 12/8, but not 3/4. basicly the difference is that while in simple time the number on the bottom is a beat, ie. in 4/4 the quarter note gets the beat, that is not so in compound time. instead what you are going to do is divide the top number by three to get the number of beats. lets look at an example of this. lets say we have something in 6/8, that means we are going to divide the 6 by 3 to get the number of beats. 6 divided by 3 is two, so we have two beats. if you look at my example above, you see i have two stressed numbers (1 and 4) so these are where your beats start.

now, if you want a little algorithm for how long each beat is, i suggest you look at the time signatures as a fraction. lets look at 6/8 again for this. a good way to look at this is six times one eighth. this makes sense because you look at that thinking you have enough room for six eighth notes, or 6 * 1/8 = 6/8. now when you divide the top number by three to find the number of beats, i would then multiply the bottom number by 3 to get the beat length. so i get 6 / 3 = 2 for the top, and 1/8 * 3 = 3/8 for the bottom. if you look at my previous post you can clearly see that there are three eighth notes per each beat in 6/8.

one cool thing about compound time is it gives off a triplet feel, but you dont have to use triplet notation which can get messy. i hope some of that made sense, im not the best at explaining all these thing. if something doesnt make sense, needs clarification, or you just have more questions, feel free to ask.
#10
Uh oh, SD, you're being challenged by one of your lessers. What say you?
Hi, I'm Peter
#11
Quote by jof1029
WRONG!

in 6/8 time the eighth note does not get the beat. the dotted quarter note gets the beat. 6/8 is compound time, so it is counted differently from normal time. heres a short thing i typed up on compound time so that hopefully you will understand it better:

compound time
etc.


I remember you wrote that in my time signature question thread

i'm having a bit of trouble myself. I have heard that 'shine on you crazy diamond' was in 9/12, but I may be wrong. and there is no such thing as a 12th note in standard notation.


It's in compound time.
#12
Quote by Dirk Gently
I know someone who learned how to play Beethoven's "Fur Elise" blisteringly fast on piano, but NEVER noticed that it was in 6/8 time until I pointed it out to him. He was playing it as if it were 3/4 time.
I hate to be a party-pooper, but both you and your friend are mistaken. Fur Elise is in 3/8.
All things are difficult before they are easy.
- Dr. Thomas Fuller (British physician, 1654-1734)
Quote by Freepower
For everything you need to know - gpb0216.
#14
Well, whatever. I don't have the sheet music in front of me and this was...like 7 or 8 years ago. It was just funny because he was playing the eighth notes that the as if it were in 3/4 time, so twice as fast. And this guy was a music major (ended up going to the Boston Conservatory for his Masters) with an immense amount of talent but apparently is illiterate.
Hi, I'm Peter
#15
Quote by 4string-tsurigi
so it's basically 3/4 time?

Well, you don't really reduce it like a fraction. See jof1029's post
#18
Actually, I didn't really think about compound time. I don't know that much about time signatures, I always just went with whatever the director was doing. However, is it not true that 6/8 could be conducted in 6 if it's slow enough?

-SD
#19
Ok, this is what I got from the Grove Dictionary of Music, as it appears here: http://www.wqxr.com/cgi-bin/iowa/cla/learning/grove.html?search=time+signature

This is the relevant part of the definition of "time signature:"

In modern usage, two figures are usually given, one above the other: the lower indicates the unit of measurement, relative to the semibreve/whole-note; the upper indicates the number of such units in each bar. Thus a signature of 3/2 indicates that there are three minims (or half-notes) in each bar; 12/8 indicates that there are 12 quavers (eighth-notes). Where the upper figure is divisible by three, the music is in compound time, i.e. the units represented by the lower figure are grouped in threes. 12/8 thus means not only that there are 12 quavers/eighth-notes to a bar but that these 12 form four groups each of three quavers/eighth-notes.

So that's saying that the normal rule applies - that the eighth note gets the beat - but when the top number is divisible by three, the eighth notes will simply be in groups of 3 rather than 2 or 4, like in 4/4 time.
Hi, I'm Peter
#20
^ thats doesnt seem like a great definition. sure it gives the basics, but doesnt really go into any sort of depth. youll have to trust me on the fact that in something like 12/8, the dotted quarter note gets the beat. if i had a scanner i would scan in a couple pages of a book i have that applies to this, but i dont and i cant type the examples (unless of course someone has a way to type up standard notation). heres a bit of an exerpt tho:

(starts with a bit on triplets)... SO if the composer wants to use this rhythm throughout a piece of music it is better to use a time signature which gives him beats he can divide by three. Such a beat is a dotted one.
We call such a dotted beat a compound beat, and the time signature using dotted beats is called a compound time signature.
Compound time, then, is the use of dotted beats and simple time is the use of undotted beats.

Of course, this needs a change of time signature.
The top figure of a compound time signature states how many subdivisions of the beat in each bar; it is three times that in a simple time signature. The bottom figure states the value of each subdivision. For example, 3/4 becomes 9/8 or three dotted crotchets.
-exerpt from Learn to Read Music by Harry Baxter and Michael Baxter.

thats probably better than my explanation and is from a book, so its more credible i guess.
#22
Still makes no sense. Why note it as 6/8 then, if the 8th note doesn't get the beat?
Hi, I'm Peter
#23
^ and therein lies the question. i dont know the answer to that, unless its because it would be impossible to notate a dotted note getting the beat. how would you notate a dotted quarter note gettin the beat? thats 3/2 a beat. so if you multiply your time signature by 3/2 you get compound time. 2/4 times 3/2 would be 6/8. which is your compound time signature of the same number of beats. thats really the only thing i can think of to explain it, and im not really sure if thats the real reason, or just something i made up cause i like to use math to understand things.
#24
Quote by Dirk Gently
Still makes no sense. Why note it as 6/8 then, if the 8th note doesn't get the beat?


its easier than writing it in 2/4 and using a ton of triplets... no idea why it is so but I believe it goes way way back (I remember hearing or reading that 9/8 was the most "perfect" time signature in baroque because of 3 being a holy number and 9/8 having 3 groups of 3 notes...)
#25
About the Fur Elise thing...
As long as you aren't playing along with a metronome playing a piece in 3/4 sounds the exact same as the same piece in 3/8 twice as fast. If that made any sense...
If you could blow up the world with a flick of a switch,
Would you do it?

If you could make everybody poor just so you could be rich,
Would you do it?

With all your power,
What would you do?
#26
Right...that's the point. He was ripping through a piece that supposed to be played with much more touch and fluidity.
Hi, I'm Peter