#1
OK, I am still having trouble grasping modes, so I just need to clear up one thing

For example, in the key of G Major, are the notes G, A, B, C, D, E, Fsharp, G

In each of the modes,

G Ionian
A Dorian
B Phygrian
C Lydian
D Mixolydian
E Aeolian
Fsharp Locrian

Each of those only contains the notes of the key of G Major?

I'm having trouble realising how the modes actually sound unique, for example, the Locrian mode doesn't sound dark to me....

Thanks
Gear:

Crafter FX550 EQL
Ibanez SA260FML

THD Univalve
Framus FR-212 Cab (Celestion Vintage 30's)

Dunlop Crybaby

Started playing May 28th 2005
#2
yea they only contain the notes of g major, but they all start and end on different notes, and it makes a bigger difference then youd think. also, if you want to get moods from different modes, youll have to play them over chords that reflect the mood your after.
hence the name "chord scales"
Last edited by metal_man12 at Jul 13, 2006,
#3
it all depends on how you use them...playing the scale ascending and descending isn't going to convey a mood...but let's say you take B phrygian, the minor second gives it an exotic feel, moreso than the major second found in the G ionian mode...see the difference? based on the rhythm and chords played behind a lead or solo and depending on what mood you want to convey, one mode will most likely work better than the other...for example, let's say you have a minor chord progression in G major like Am, Em, Bm...now, you will want to use minor-based scales over this progression, so you'd probably be better off using A dorian over the Am, E aeolian over Em, and B Phrygian over Bm...try playing G ionian over that progression, you'll see the difference
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#5
ok thanks everyone, I think I'm actually finally starting to get modes...

Thanks
Gear:

Crafter FX550 EQL
Ibanez SA260FML

THD Univalve
Framus FR-212 Cab (Celestion Vintage 30's)

Dunlop Crybaby

Started playing May 28th 2005
#6
To get each mode's feel, you need to have the right chords being played in the background. F# Locrian won't sound dark unless you have a chord progression in the key of G major that resolved to an F#dim chord.
#7
^^I thought it would be an Fsharp Minor7 flat5....
Gear:

Crafter FX550 EQL
Ibanez SA260FML

THD Univalve
Framus FR-212 Cab (Celestion Vintage 30's)

Dunlop Crybaby

Started playing May 28th 2005
#8
Also, I know Satch uses the Phygrian Dominant alot, but I'm wondering about it, what exactly is it?
Gear:

Crafter FX550 EQL
Ibanez SA260FML

THD Univalve
Framus FR-212 Cab (Celestion Vintage 30's)

Dunlop Crybaby

Started playing May 28th 2005
#9
to really get the hang of modes don't think of them as the notes of G major strting on a dofeerent note but entirely seperate scale. playing modal arpeggios really helps you get the feel of it
#10
Quote by supermc
Also, I know Satch uses the Phygrian Dominant alot, but I'm wondering about it, what exactly is it?


It's the Phrygian mode with a raised 3rd.



[B][U]Phrygian Dominant[/U][/B].

[B]1 b2 3 4 5 b6 b7 1[/B].


It is also the 5th (dominant) mode of the harmonic minor scale.

Quote by supermc
I'm having trouble realising how the modes actually sound unique, for example, the Locrian mode doesn't sound dark to me.


That's something you're not going to figure out just playing the modes. I've said it in another thread, but incase you missed that thread, I'll repeat it.

My advice for you would be to learn each mode in a specific key completely independent of one another - that is, one learn mode - become familiar with it and use it. Then move onto another.

A method I find that helps with this is to simply pedal one single chord and play a corresponding mode over it. For example, take C - pedal that chord over and over, now play C Ionian over it to your hearts content, then switch to C Lydian, then C Mixolydian and so on and so forth. It helped me focus on each modes individual characteristics and traits and see them as individuals, as opposed to just modes being a collective group of scales you want to use because, well - you can.

A variation on that would be to get a friend to pedal a chord, or chord progression and for you to play and experiment with modes, then switch places while he plays and you strum. This method might stop you from thinking ''Oh, modes. Boooring!'' as usually if a friend is involved, an element of fun is brought forward, not that learning every single thing shouldn't be fun, of course it should. But I usually find this method keeps people interested.

This was redwing_sucks reply.

Quote by redwing_suck
^No, actually that's the best way to be able to distinguish between modes' sounds... playing all 7 different modes with the same root note. Just make a recording of a C note over and over to a click track or metronome, let it repeat, and start by just playing the mode's position up and down over and over. Then, work on phrasing. Rinse and repeat.


Maybe the confirmation of someone on the 'Who To Listen To' list will help you - either way, I hope that answered your question
Last edited by Johnljones7443 at Jul 13, 2006,
#11
OK thanks for your help
Gear:

Crafter FX550 EQL
Ibanez SA260FML

THD Univalve
Framus FR-212 Cab (Celestion Vintage 30's)

Dunlop Crybaby

Started playing May 28th 2005
#12
I found these video / sound clips a while back.
Its a bloke called Frank Gambale playing solos, based over actual modes.
If you listen to them, you can hear a difference.

I figured they would come in useful, if you want to hear the differences between modes.
Notice how he makes the locrian mode feel dark.

Ionian Mode
Dorian Mode
Phrygian Mode
Lydian Mode
Mixolydian mode
Aeolian Mode
Locrian Mode

The chord progressions he plays over all relate to the mode hes soloing over to help emphasize(sp?) the feeling hes trying to produce.

The good clips are: Ionian - Phrygian - Aeolian and Locrian
Been away, am back
#13
Just the other day I decided to look into modes, and it tok 3 days to grasp, but I made this little help sheet...hope it helps...


To any major scale, flatten the notes indicated here.
(all of the following are from the A major scale)


Ionian Mode (major)
(C D E F G A B C)
1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 1
A B C# D E F# G# A

Dorian Mode
(D E F G A B C D)
1, 2, b3, 4, 5, 6, b7, 1
A B C D E F# G A

Phrygian Mode
(E F G A B C D E)
1, b2, b3, 4, 5, b6, b7, 1
A Bb C D E F G A

Lydian Mode
(F G A B C D E F)
1, 2, 3, #4, 5, 6, 7, 1
A B C# Eb E F# G# A

Mixolydian Mode
(G A B C D E F G)
1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, b7, 1
A B C# D E F# G A

Aeolian Mode (natural minor)
(A B C D E F G A)
1, 2, b3, 4, 5, b6, b7, 1
A B C D E F G A

Locrian Mode
(B C D E F G A B)
1, b2, b3, 4, b5, b6, b7, 1
A Bb C D Eb F G A
#14
Logz thanks, but Scard ^^ I've grasped them now thanks, its just a matter of the chords that go under them and stuff , but thanks anyway
Gear:

Crafter FX550 EQL
Ibanez SA260FML

THD Univalve
Framus FR-212 Cab (Celestion Vintage 30's)

Dunlop Crybaby

Started playing May 28th 2005