#1
Hello, just wondering if anyone could give me any tips on the best way to remove the paintwork from a strat!

ta in advance

Jonny
I lost my faith in the summer time.
#2
Most people say good old sanding however with my strat build, im seeing how well heat stripping works.
#4
I have a related question...hope you don't mind me hijacking your thread :P

Is it imperative that when sanding away the old finish, that you have it sanded right down to the wood? Even if you plan to prime it?
#5
^ i do believe it would be safer if you went to wood, but it may work, depends on how strong the finish is to start with, and the finish being put one, ie if it was black before, i suggest going to wood before paint white, vice versa, etc.
Member of the "Marty Friedman > You" Club. PM apocalypse13 or altronataku to join

Gear:

ESP LTD DV8-R
Squier SG (Specs Unknown)
Kustom KGA-10 Ten watt practice amp
Marshall TSL 602

My JEM Build
#6
Alright, but what if I just sanded off the paint? There's still some sort of sealer or something underneath. Is it completely necessary to sand that all away too?
#7
Quote by jon3782001
Hello, just wondering if anyone could give me any tips on the best way to remove the paintwork from a strat!

ta in advance

Jonny


Sanding. Not all strippers will work on the modern finishes.

Quote by dbzrage3k
Alright, but what if I just sanded off the paint? There's still some sort of sealer or something underneath. Is it completely necessary to sand that all away too?


You can stop at the sealer if you want.
You can just scuff the old finish and spray over that if you wanted to.
#8
Quote by dbzrage3k
Alright, but what if I just sanded off the paint? There's still some sort of sealer or something underneath. Is it completely necessary to sand that all away too?



wait so it goes (from top to bottom) Final gloss, Paint, then another sealant? if so then if the paint could stick to it, it'll probably be fine, but you might wanna ask someone else, i'm not exactly an expert, just trying to help
Member of the "Marty Friedman > You" Club. PM apocalypse13 or altronataku to join

Gear:

ESP LTD DV8-R
Squier SG (Specs Unknown)
Kustom KGA-10 Ten watt practice amp
Marshall TSL 602

My JEM Build
#9
Yeah, Usually if you refinish a solid color youre fine just scuffing the clear coat with 220. But since you went to the sealer that'll be fine as well.

And from top to bottom, it is clear coat, color coat, primer, sealant, grainfiller.

Sandign to the wood is a complete waste of time unless you're going to use a water based dye. Then it is requiered to sand down to wood. But even then, you can use alcohol based dyes on teh sealant after you take off hte color coat.

Oh threadstarter, there are thre ways to strip a finish, sanding, heat gun, and a chemical stripper. A methylene chloride based stripper can take off most finishes. A heat gun will also work, but can burn the wood, as well as cost abtou 40 bucks for eth actual gun. Sanding just takes an awful long time.
Projectguitar.com has tutorials for all of the methods lsited above. I think
#11
i would use paint stripper for a start then sand.
Current playing with:
Cort x-6 -->Laney HCM65R


On Zakk Wylde's guitar.
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#12
When removing the old finish, should I sand it down, and start moving up in sandpaper grits, so I have a smooth wood top to paint on? Or is it better to leave it rougher so the paint adheres better?
#13
Quote by dbzrage3k
When removing the old finish, should I sand it down, and start moving up in sandpaper grits, so I have a smooth wood top to paint on? Or is it better to leave it rougher so the paint adheres better?

Yes.

As pointed out above, you only sand to bare wood if you plan to do a natural finish OR transparent color. In my build, I originally planned to do a transparent finish IF the wood grain was attractive ... unfortunately, it wasn't.

The thing about sanding manually is that after you've finished the project, you'll love your guitar more because you spent several hours just getting to bare wood .. not talking about belt sanders here.

Tip: sand with the grain NOT across. Good Luck!
#14
Quote by dbzrage3k
I have a related question...hope you don't mind me hijacking your thread :P

Is it imperative that when sanding away the old finish, that you have it sanded right down to the wood? Even if you plan to prime it?

No, not imperative, although I'm sure most folks will agree, the thinner the finish the better
#15
Quote by Ippon
Yes.

As pointed out above, you only sand to bare wood if you plan to do a natural finish OR transparent color. In my build, I originally planned to do a transparent finish IF the wood grain was attractive ... unfortunately, it wasn't.

The thing about sanding manually is that after you've finished the project, you'll love your guitar more because you spent several hours just getting to bare wood .. not talking about belt sanders here.

Tip: sand with the grain NOT across. Good Luck!


Great, but that didn't answer my question at all :P

I'm asking if while sanding down the old finish...for example, should I sand down with 100 grit, then move up to 220 so the wood is quite smooth before painting? Or should I stop after the 100 so that the new paint has a rougher surface to cling to?
#16
Sand down with 60, when you're getting close to wood use 100, then finish up with 220. You'll most likely have to grain fill the body (depending on the wood) and most grainfillers require 220 on the wood before applying. Follow the directions, sand it back with 220, move to 320 then 400. Then start painting. 220 grit sanded body soaks up much more finish than a body sanded smooth with 400. If the body doesnt need grainfiller, just skip that step and move to 320.

Forgot to mention when you move up to higher grits you should only be sanding enough to remove the grit marks from the previous grade sandpaper.