#1
Is the general rule simply that if you don't hear the fret buzz through your amp, then that's an acceptable amount? I've noticed that when I play my Strat unplugged, I hear quite a lot of fret buzz. However, I don't hear any of it through my amp... although I never have my amp cranked, so I can still hear the fret buzz over my amp.... it's actually quote annoying.

Is this something that I should try to get fixed with a professional setup, or something I should accept as being unavoidable?
#2
Well if it's buzzing, then the strings are hitting something, therefore you're killing your sustain and tone. I'd get it set up or do it yourself. There are plenty of tutorials online to adjust your truss rod, but if you're at all worried, take it to a pro

Bry
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#3
My acceptable ammount is none. A little bit is tolerable, as long as it doesnt make any notes sound out of tune or something along those lines.
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#4
if your happy with the action though.........might be annoying if you get it hightened. if you cant hear it through amp it aint so bad :p
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#5
Yeah, unfortunately I've been making minor adjustments on this thing for weeks, basically first putting everything to exact Fender specs, and then slowly raising the action to try and eliminate the buzzing. And it isn't working... sigh, I guess it's time to take it to a pro. And it's a brand new guitar too.
#6
Quote by globetro
Yeah, unfortunately I've been making minor adjustments on this thing for weeks, basically first putting everything to exact Fender specs, and then slowly raising the action to try and eliminate the buzzing. And it isn't working... sigh, I guess it's time to take it to a pro. And it's a brand new guitar too.


That's completely normal. Alot of guitars come without proper setup. Hell mine came with a bow in the wrong direction. When you raise the action are you simply raising the bridge? Or have you done truss rod adjustments already?

Bry
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#7
I've adjusted the truss rod to the "proper" amount specified in the manual. From there, I've just been raising the bridge.
#8
Not to insult your intelligence, just trying to figure everything out, but how did you adjust it, what measurements, tools etc did you use. Also, what string gauge and tuning are you using, the same gauge that came on the guitar?

Bry
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#9
I changed the strings to a set of 9 gauge D'Addario's. (I believe it's same gauge as the one's that came with the guitar). I then capo'd the first fret and fretted the last fret, and checked the string height at the 8th fret, and set it to .012" using a feeler gauge.

Then I set the string heights to what was specified in the manual (I can't remember the exact numbers) using a ruler with 1/64" increments. After that, I tried raising the strings at the bridge to try and eliminate the fret buzz, but I couldn't quite eliminate all the fret buzz. I'm not sure what else I can do now.

Thanks for the help!
#11
Disclaimer: Please dont take this the wrong way, I have no idea of your experience levels at this stage:
Is there any chance a change in playing style would help? My son buzzes his string because he tends to pluck them outward rather than along the line of the guitar body. Hence they slap back into the frets rather than oscilating on a plane above them... does that make sense? It's easier to explain with a diagram.
#12
He fingerpicks electric guitar? What do you mean he plucks them? When he plays chords what does he do? Your son is simply not using proper technique, The strings should played by pushing them to one side with a pick or your finger, not plucked upwards. I've got to imagine he gets a bad tone.
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#13
actually he's on a classical, so he fingerpicks. Yes his technique is poor but he is 9 years old and doesn't practice very much or take instruction very well.

Your description of the required technique is good.
#14
Quote by EagleC
actually he's on a classical, so he fingerpicks. Yes his technique is poor but he is 9 years old and doesn't practice very much or take instruction very well.

Your description of the required technique is good.

Oh, I see, sorry if I seemed rude. But yeah, the proper classical technique is easier achieved with long fingernails, but then again he is 9. Classical is great to learn on though, It builds rhythym and teaches theory and all that stuff if you learn it correctly.
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#15
So back to the point I meant to make , if <threadstarter> is using a wrong or overtly agressive playing technique that could cause frett buzz.
#17
Quote by EagleC
So back to the point I meant to make , if <threadstarter> is using a wrong or overtly agressive playing technique that could cause frett buzz.

well....yes picking the string up/away from the fretboard will cause it to vibrate differently(to and from the fretboard). Whereas picking the string side to side would cause it to vibrate...side to side. So yeah, teach him to pick instead of pluck to reduce fret buzz
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#18
Fretbuzz is most commonly a result of agressive playing, however it is possible to have fretbuzz while lightly strumming. The latter is usually a result if your action being to low, yet it can also be a result of your neck being bowed in a convex direction (if your looking at it from the side it would look like its curved upward((if the strings are facing up)) thus convex)
#19
Interesting. I've actually wondered for a while if it's caused by aggressive playing or incorrect picking. When I play fingerstyle on my guitar, I don't get any buzz. It's only when picking. Or when strumming "enthusiastically", mainly when playing power chords.

Although it feels like anything more than "light" picking will tend to cause some buzzing. Especially when fretting around the middle of the neck, or when fretting the low-E string.

I'm pretty sure I'm picking properly (picking straight down/up and not plucking outwards) as I'd think my guitar teacher would've told me if I wasn't.
#20
Man... Your not the only one with a buzzing fretboard... Alot of people play their guitars with buzzing on their fretboards when the way to avoid buzzing is simple. My Bassists dad was talking to me and the lead guitarist about harmonic tunning and he came up talking about buzzing fretboards because he noticed while I was playing I had a buss past the 12th fret on my A and D string. Then he told me to make sure the length of the bridge is the same as the base to the 12th fret. So I picked up an alen wrench once I got home and adjusted my bridge next thing you know... Walah no buzzing in my fretboard... Give it a try!
#21
er Sorry I dont understand, "the length of the bridge" ? are you talking about adjusting intonation?
#22
Hey,can someone tell me where my fret buzz is?all 6 strings buzz,but i dont see any of the strings touching the fretwires..could it be the truss rod?Thanks for helping
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#23
Quote by Broken-pick
Hey,can someone tell me where my fret buzz is?all 6 strings buzz,but i dont see any of the strings touching the fretwires..could it be the truss rod?Thanks for helping


http://schrammguitars.com/buzz.html

Bry
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#24
Quote by globetro
Yeah, unfortunately I've been making minor adjustments on this thing for weeks, basically first putting everything to exact Fender specs, and then slowly raising the action to try and eliminate the buzzing. And it isn't working... sigh, I guess it's time to take it to a pro. And it's a brand new guitar too.

How new?

Any guitar will need a little time to 'settle' or 'play in'. After this time adjustments should or could be made.

Usually you can return it to the shop after this time and they'll set it up for you free of charge.