#1
soon im going to start my 21 day progam routine, playing everything painfully slow to increase my speed and accuracy.my question is, is it okay to have speed bursts? Let's say I play a lick at drop dead speed for about 2 hours, and then i play the lick faster than my maximum speed for about 10-15 minutes. would this **** with my muscle memory, or is it okay?
#2
if you can play it cleanly, i don't see the harm in it
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#3
Quote by razorback_89
soon im going to start my 21 day progam routine, playing everything painfully slow to increase my speed and accuracy.my question is, is it okay to have speed bursts? Let's say I play a lick at drop dead speed for about 2 hours, and then i play the lick faster than my maximum speed for about 10-15 minutes. would this **** with my muscle memory, or is it okay?

Did you read the thread about building speed in the Archives? Cas had a routine for it and it included 5 minute speed burtst. I sugggest you check it out if you haven't already.
#4
^i remember that! see if i have a link for that...no sorry. but yeah, short bursts are ok.
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#6
Quote by kirbyrocknroll
Did you read the thread about building speed in the Archives? Cas had a routine for it and it included 5 minute speed burtst. I sugggest you check it out if you haven't already.



Yeah, i did read it, thats where i got the speed burst idea from, but wouldnt it screw around with my muscle memory, making me play sloppy
#7
Quote by razorback_89
Yeah, i did read it, thats where i got the speed burst idea from, but wouldnt it screw around with my muscle memory, making me play sloppy


If you'd read the thread properly... I'll take a few quotes from it that might clear things up.

Quote by casualty01
the only thing I'd add to his bit is to include speed bursts. while practicing slowly does improve speed and accuracy greatly, adding speed bursts in every so often will do so more effectively.


Quote by casualty01
so say you were to do the 21 day thing (which would also prove to be much more beneficial in more ways than just speed development, believe me.) and say you practiced 2 hours a day doing that one exercise.... I might

play that at one tempo for an hour straight
5 minute break
5 minutes of continuous speed bursts ( that means play it fast, stop, play it fast again, stop, etc... not just in a continuous loop)
20 minutes slow
5 minutes speed bursts
20 minutes slow
and then top if off playing ridiculously fast for a minute or so.

this last minute or two is actually very important... paying no attention to anything but effortless speed.... that means no muscle tension, no thought, no nothing, just motion.

don't even worry about accuracy. just move your fingers in line with the lick or exercise (as by now they know full well where they're supposed to go) and move your picking hand as required (it also will know it's path by now. the only difference being that the accuracy & syncronization isn't quite there betwixt the two lol)

but that doesn't matter for this purpose. what you're teaching your hands in this 1-2 minute segment is how it feels to move effortlessly and without impedence of thought.


And finally...

Quote by sixteen times
I'm aprehensive (sp?) to do these short speed bursts now, after what Resi said... hmm...


Followed by...

Quote by casualty01
lol, this is one of those things i do not yet understand of the human psyche..

1. A seasoned guitar teacher and professional musician has posted about the benefits of using small intermitant speed bursts

2. A master musician who plays with the greatest musicians in the world and is held by all in high regard has written and entire book on effortless mastery of your intsrument in which playing faster than you can accurately play for short periods is a part of his advice

3. some of the fastest and most deadly accurate players in the world advocate this very concept every time they're asked about technique practice. including many more than the names I mentioned before

yet... you're apprehensive about it because some random 16 yr old bedroom shredder (no offence resiliance, really. we were all there at one time or another) has quams with the concept that all these experienced musicians who have attained that elusive technical mastery of the instrument are promoting..?


lol... ok.

well, I do understand the apprehensiveness... I do. that's the ego messing with you. we all have it.... it's saying "oh no, what if I try this breifly for 21 days and it doesn't work? well, I don't wanna lose any progress I've already made, so even though it might propell my playing and approach on the instrument far beyond what I realize right now, we should just stick to what we're doing now... "

it's a common thing. the fear of realizing theres a better way (if that better way appears to be, at first, slow) because if you find out there is a better way, the mind then has a way of kicking yourself for not trying that thing sooner and going "man, all that wasted time doing it the old way" ....

so rather than the pain of somehow thinking you've wasted time, we just stick to our old habits and patterns in the hopes that it'll work out best.

and hey, if you do try it and do it correctly and it doesn't work (which I doubt) then it's not wasted time, it's not failure.... you learned something. you learned what didn't work. and that in and of itself, if it's the only thing you learn or get out of it, is a valuable lesson.

anyways... enough with the psychology of it all...

I suggest you take the wise road and at least apply the principle (this sound principle that is known to work and used by outstanding players all over the world) again... correctly... and see if it has anything to offer you.


Better?

I urge you to read the thread thoroughly again if you're still having any problems.
#8
I'm going to try this program a different way...... Instead of playing ridiculously slow for 21 days im just going to start at a slow speed and increase my speed gradually everyday, getting faster and faster.

To me this seems to be more benficial, and more interesting, than the 21 day method. But what are your thoughts?
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#9
Quote by stratman_mjc
I'm going to try this program a different way...... Instead of playing ridiculously slow for 21 days im just going to start at a slow speed and increase my speed gradually everyday, getting faster and faster.

To me this seems to be more benficial, and more interesting, than the 21 day method. But what are your thoughts?



actually, thats the strategy i used for a couple of weeks. I would play along with guitarpro , put in on a loop and programed it so everytime the riff repeats it would go up 1 bpm. It kinda worked, but i wasnt completely satisfied with the results.The 21 day thing seems like a better idea to me. But it might work for you, so go for it.


By the way Johnljones7443, thanks alot, real helpful.
#10
^ yeah i think i will try it. It better work!
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#11
how about practicing fast changing in powerchords thats really far from eachother? by begginning slowly for about 2 hours a day for 3 weeks? would it make my powerchord changes faster and more clean and acurate?
#12
Quote by razorback_89
soon im going to start my 21 day progam routine, playing everything painfully slow to increase my speed and accuracy.my question is, is it okay to have speed bursts? Let's say I play a lick at drop dead speed for about 2 hours, and then i play the lick faster than my maximum speed for about 10-15 minutes. would this **** with my muscle memory, or is it okay?


I think it would. I'd also think you are rushing things and losing progress.

Look at it this way, say you plant an apple seed.

Would dumping 3000 gallons of water on the ground after you plant it all at once make an apple tree grow any faster?

An apple grows when its ready to and the process for doing so is complete. The same for speed.

A consistent, accurate, intelligent slow practice, and long term development will improve muscle memory, and naturalization of the physical mechanics. Its not done only in number of reps, but in the memory transition from short term, to long term permanence.

Best,

Sean
#13
Quote by louis van wyk
how about practicing fast changing in powerchords thats really far from eachother? by begginning slowly for about 2 hours a day for 3 weeks? would it make my powerchord changes faster and more clean and acurate?


If you know that you can slide powerchords up a string so there aren't any -real far from eachother powerchords-.... I'd say it isn't really that helpful. If you play for 1-2 years then you can do this automatically, and also, there is no real need to change those SUPA fast, not even in those thrashmetal songs, playing fluently and tight is important yes, but I don't see a real need to practice changing powerchords for 2 hours a day - 3 weeks. There are nearly no powerchords real far away from eachother, and even if you find a reason to do that, you'll need some 200+ bpm songs that go through this powerchords every 2 beats or something . It seems to me that you are a beginner, is that right?
But to answer the question scientifically... It will make your changes faster and probably more clean and accurate. But that comes with time, and you don't really need that skill in the early stages, and later on those skills usually develop themselfs, for the most part that is.
#14
Quote by razorback_89
soon im going to start my 21 day progam routine, playing everything painfully slow to increase my speed and accuracy.my question is, is it okay to have speed bursts? Let's say I play a lick at drop dead speed for about 2 hours, and then i play the lick faster than my maximum speed for about 10-15 minutes. would this **** with my muscle memory, or is it okay?


It will only mess up your muscle memory if you actually forget how you was playing it.

If you played it at slow tempo 1000 times and knew it like the back of your hand (knew when to down/up/alt pick, how much you need to dampen the strings, knew where your fretting hand was going next, knew which finger was coming, and of course how it is supposed to sound) then doing speed bursts won't make that much difference, other than you might not be able to play it at that speed - because you know the motions, you know how it feels and what your body expects. It's just like when you were learning to change between open chords, you don't have to look or check you're playing a D chord because your fingers just take you there, it's effortless.

The problem is if you only, say, played it 10 times, and thought "yeah, I can play that, let's make this bitch faster" and then played it another 10 times slightly differently, and then upped the tempo again and again, each time playing it a bit differently and increasing tension, then you're not building muscle memory as your motions are inconsistent, and the only way to correct it is to start again.
Last edited by Calibos at Jan 25, 2011,
#15
Quote by louis van wyk
how about practicing fast changing in powerchords thats really far from eachother? by begginning slowly for about 2 hours a day for 3 weeks? would it make my powerchord changes faster and more clean and acurate?

This thread is five....FIVE....years old!!!
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#16
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This thread is five....FIVE....years old!!!

Hah lol indeed I didn't notice it either.. This thread is still being used today.. awesome, isn't it