#1
I keep hearing conflicting explanations regarding modes (or maybe I just suck at theory...both are likely) Is the mode determined only by the root note I start the major scale on, or is there a specific scale for each mode?

For instance, if I were playing over a chord progression in the key of E and I played the major scale with the root note G#, would I be playing the phygian mode, or is there a specific scale I need to be playing, and would I play it starting on G# or E?
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#2
just play, and if it sounds nice, then youve done a good job
Will

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#3
Quote by St-Anger
just play, and if it sounds nice, then youve done a good job


It's not enough to sound nice, I want to know why I sound nice, which is where theory comes in.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#4
alot of people say crap like its just starting the scale of a differnt note, im sure youve heard this

although this is true that doesnt mean anything musically, modes are really how sharps/flats work

for instnace

b7 equals mixolydian, major feel with a funky 7th
b7 b3 dorian wich is pretty bluesy, same scale as purple has
and so on and so forth

they all sound different work on one at a time
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#5
most rck tunes only use those above, plus the minor scale b7 b3 b6
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#6
But specifically, if I wanted to play something like lydian over a C chord progression, what scale shape would I be playing, and where would I be playing it?
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#7
Quote by Archeo Avis
I keep hearing conflicting explanations regarding modes (or maybe I just suck at theory...both are likely) Is the mode determined only by the root note I start the major scale on, or is there a specific scale for each mode?

For instance, if I were playing over a chord progression in the key of E and I played the major scale with the root note G#, would I be playing the phygian mode, or is there a specific scale I need to be playing, and would I play it starting on G# or E?


Alrighty..

If you are playing in E..(not Em)..you could play G Phryigian. It would look like this:

G Phryigian

e 14 15 17
b 14 15 17
g 14 16
d 14 16 17
a 14 16 17
e 14 15 17

Now your probably asking, "If It's G Phryigian, why doesn't the mode start on G?"

The answer to that is this:

EVERY MODE STARTS ON THE SECOND NOTE OF THE PREVIOUS MODE.

So in that case, we can play F# Dorian, which look like the following:

F# Dorian

e 12 14 15
b 12 14 15
g 12 14
d 12 14 16
a 12 14 16
e 12 14 15

You can play any mode in the key of E. There is never a certain mode that you HAVE to play. However some will sound better in some situations. For example, If your playing in a minor key, try out Dorian, or Aeolian. However, although both these modes are minor, the feel they give are completely different.

Which is what modes do. They give a mood. Every single mode gives a different mood.Which leads me to this:

"Let's say I was playing a chord progression in E".

Depending on the chords in the progression, different modes would sound good. Like if you had a diminished chord in there, try out Locrean. Different modes sound good at different times. After you try out all the modes and use them, you will see what you like, and what sounds good, and what doesn't.

I hope this answers your question.

-Slash Jr.
#8
You'd be playing the shape of Lydian, which in the key of C starts on an F and progresses like this:

e----------------------------------------3-5-7
B--------------------------------3-5-6
G------------------------2-4-5
D-----------------2-3-5
A----------2-3-5
E--1-3-5

It's not a "scale shape" per se. It's just a mode that you move in accordance with what key your in. The modes go in this order, starting with whatever major key your in.

i Ionian
ii Dorian
iii Phrygian
iv Lydian
v Mixolydian (although the spelling's probably off on this one)
vi Aeolian
vii Locrian

So if you're in the key of G, and you want to play say aeolian.... it would land on your E.
You with me?
#9
I posted this in another topic...but here it is again...the help sheet i came to after 3 days of studying modes.


To any major scale, flatten the notes indicated here.
(all of the following are from the A major scale)


Ionian Mode (major)
(C D E F G A B C)
1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 1
A B C# D E F# G# A

Dorian Mode
(D E F G A B C D)
1, 2, b3, 4, 5, 6, b7, 1
A B C D E F# G A

Phrygian Mode
(E F G A B C D E)
1, b2, b3, 4, 5, b6, b7, 1
A Bb C D E F G A

Lydian Mode
(F G A B C D E F)
1, 2, 3, #4, 5, 6, 7, 1
A B C# Eb E F# G# A

Mixolydian Mode
(G A B C D E F G)
1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, b7, 1
A B C# D E F# G A

Aeolian Mode (natural minor)
(A B C D E F G A)
1, 2, b3, 4, 5, b6, b7, 1
A B C D E F G A

Locrian Mode
(B C D E F G A B)
1, b2, b3, 4, b5, b6, b7, 1
A Bb C D Eb F G A
#10
So if I had a chord progression...Cm - Em - Am

Would I play C Aeolian over it, or A aeolian?
Do the chords all have to be minor in ordeer to get the effect of the aeolian mode, or could I switch the Cm to Cmaj without getting too much dissonance?
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#11
Quote by Archeo Avis
So if I had a chord progression...Cm - Em - Am

Would I play C Aeolian over it, or A aeolian?
Do the chords all have to be minor in ordeer to get the effect of the aeolian mode, or could I switch the Cm to Cmaj without getting too much dissonance?


C ionian + Cmin chord progression = bleh!

to get the full effect of a minor progression, your best off using minor-based scales to play over them, preferrably the respective modes
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