#1
I'm fairly new to learning scales, and was wondering what scales are most often used in Classic Rock and Hard Rock solos and leads. Any feedback and advice would be much appreciated.
#2
pentatonic, minor or major :p
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#3
Definately pentatonic. That's the most basic scale in rock/metal. If you're just beginning pentatonics are wat you should learn.

They're easy, fun, and it's easy to create your own riff or lick.

There's a whole lesson on it.
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#4
Yeah, I've basically got pentatonics down, and I've watched the video lesson on it. Any other suggestions? Cause there's a local band in Baltimore that has a great lead guitar player, and while he was still in his former band he recorded one song in particular with a great solo, and I guess I want that Garage Hard Rock Bluesy band kinda sound in my solos. Somewhat of an Aerosmith meets Guns 'n' Roses, classy style with a dirty sound.

Any other ideas? I' pretty good with my B, C, and F major and minor blues scales, and I was wondering if there were some interesting scales I could throw into the mix to spice it up.
#5
Any of the major modes, really. There aren't really genre-specific scales here... every genre can use every scale.
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#6
Quote by redwing_suck
Any of the major modes, really. There aren't really genre-specific scales here... every genre can use every scale.


Yeah, that's true. But, I guess I'm not really asking what other bands use, rather than scales that go well together. But, I guess they all go together if you know how to use.
#7
Even though you said you already know Pentatonics, it sounds like thats what you need. Just work on new ways to play them if you want that rock/bluesy sound. If you're bored with the scale, you've probably not explored it deep enough. Add a note or two and see if you can modify the feel of it that way.

I like playing a Minor Pentatonic but using occasional notes from the Natural Minor to add something new to it. It's very easy to do because the Minor Pentatonic is just the Natural Minor with a few notes removed. It's easy to start filling in those gaps.

I have nothing against modes, but feel you can pull a ton of ideas from the Penatonic scales and your traditonal Major and Minor scale without ever sounding stale. Personally, I am not at that point yet, but strive to be. Most people get bored with them and do not dig deep enough into them to realized the amount of possibilities you truely have with theses scales.
Last edited by Bob Sacamano at Jul 14, 2006,
#9
Quote by Bob Sacamano
Even though you said you already know Pentatonics, it sounds like thats what you need. Just work on new ways to play them if you want that rock/bluesy sound. If you're bored with the scale, you've probably not explored it deep enough. Add a note or two and see if you can modify the feel of it that way.

I like playing a Minor Pentatonic but using occasional notes from the Natural Minor to add something new to it. It's very easy to do because the Minor Pentatonic is just the Natural Minor with a few notes removed. It's easy to start filling in those gaps.

I have nothing against modes, but feel you can pull a ton of ideas from the Penatonic scales and your traditonal Major and Minor scale without ever sounding stale. Personally, I am not at that point yet, but strive to be. Most people get bored with them and do not dig deep enough into them to realized the amount of possibilities you truely have with theses scales.


Nice post, there are very many things that can be done with the pentatonic scales. Just as some beginners might rely on it too heavily, I think other players can be too quick to dismiss it.

But if you are wondering what scales are used when YOU play a classic rock song, I think just about any scale can be used. Especially over a one or two chord vamp, there are tons of options, and you can switch between the notes of many scales if you know what you're doing.
#12
Quote by edg
I'd say classic rock is in general pentatonic maj & min, myxlodian and dorian.
But, the tonal center is pretty solid on the minor pent. Of course this is totally
a gross generalization.


+1.
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