#1
A Tele question, I guess...
My son (15) is interested in beginning to learn guitar. He's never played any
instrument before. He has a birthday coming soon...I guess my question for you guys
is this...he wants a Tele...(Squier or Fender)...he likes classic rock...Stones, etc...
Are the Squiers a good starting point? Are they a good, basic guitar? Or should I
just get him into a basic Fender Standard Tele? You guys seem to have a good grasp
on the quality of new guitars. I'm not sure if he's gonna stick with playing, lessons, etc. This may be a phase.
So, all elitism aside, are Squiers a decent guitar? For a dad like me, the possibilities
seem to be endless...Fender offers like 100 Teles...If I get him into a good Squier...
(he likes the Standard in Vintage Blonde)...is it something he can learn on, and keep
for a while? I've visited all the sites he's referred me to, and quite honestly, I think
people are more interested in what kind of wood a guitar is made of, than whether or
not the guitar is solid.
Also, if I get him a Standard Squier...have it set up by a local luthier...wouldn't that be a good starting point for a new player?
I know amps are another whole issue...I think he needs a good, basic practice amp
for now...10 / 15 watts. Do you guys agree? Maybe a Vox, Marshall, Fender???
Any input from you guys would be greatly appreciated.
I may be way off base, (and an old fart)...but my opinion is that he should start on a
good Squier...learn to play...see if he wants to stick with it (put in the time to practice,
and maybe after a year or two, move up to a better guitar?
By the way, I've spoken to one or two decent players who say that a Squier is a
perfectly good starting point for a new player...and with upgrades, can (may) be a
really good little guitar. I mean, this kid's nowhere near being a pro!
I'm leaning toward getting him a Squier Standard Tele...Vintage Blonde, with either a
small Marshall practice amp or a small Fender practice amp...
I'd appreciate any input from you guys...I'm kinda lost here...but wanna get him something he won't be embarassed with. Thank you all for any input!!
#2
They are alright. As a beginner guitar, yes they are pretty good to start off, but don't go anywhere after that. I recommend getting the Fender because if he is really serious about learning to play guitar, then with the Fender, he wouldn't need to upgrade for a while. If he isn't that serious, then the Squier.
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#3
the other guys right
i think youd be off buying the squire first either way though cos theres no 100% guarantee that hes gonna stick with it, so youd be better buying the squire, not as much money being wasted if he doesnt play it, and it is a good starter guitar
#4
I own a Fender squire stratacaster. I like it alot. I have been playing for almost 7 months now and its a great guitar. Good price in case it is a phase, i spent 160. Never had a problem with it. I suggest it.
#5
As far as quality goes, with inexpensive Fenders and all Squiers, the quality of the finished product varies greatly from one guitar to another. You can have one that is great and then one that just feels very crappy, is fretted poorly, etc. If you don't play yourself, bring someone along with you who knows how to play and get their opinion. Don't buy the Squier pack. As far as amps go, I've tried out several under $100 amps recently, and I thought the best 2 were the Vox Pathfinder and the Marshall MG10CD. I didn't like the Fender's distortion at all, and the Crate was mediocre. For $125, you can get the Roland MicroCube, which is an excellent small, portable amp. For that price you should also consider the Vox AD15VT. Stay away from the Peavey Blazer 158 or other small, solid state Peaveys, as they suck (I know from personal experience).
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#6
I would start out with the squier. Given that he's just beginning to learn (or will be, for that matter) having the fender tele as opposed to the squier really isn't going to make that much of a difference. Once he's played for a year or two he'll probably want to upgrade - so be prepared for that. Same goes for the amp - a little 15w will provide plenty of juice for him to learn on. He'll probably be ready to upgrade the amp before the guitar - more times than not it is the amp that really makes the sound better.
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#8
Stay as far away from the marshall mg series. they have no tone really. Rather get the VOX Valvetronix 15 or 30, those are PERFECT for classic rock.

Squire is a great starting point to see if he will stick with it and he can try things on it and prang it around cause its cheap whereas the fender he will be carefull not to prang it. But If you want also good quality and quite cheap check out the Fender MIM Telecasters.
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Last edited by Distortion_101 at Jul 14, 2006,
#9
I own a Marshall 15 watt amp, It has distortion built in. I payed 200 for it but it was worth it. Then if he wants to play around with different sounds there is no need to go out and buy a distortion petel.
#11
A good starting amp might be the VOx AD15VT or the AD 30VT, they have multiple amp models and effects built in, and are not very expensive
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#12
Despite popular belief, squires are really good instruments. However, the quality control is pretty bad so you have to find a good one. Squires and Mexican Fenders in general vary greatly, one may be good, one may be horrible. But if you find a good squire, it will be a very solid guitar. So you should bring a friend or something that knows thier guitars, and he/she can try them out for you.

After you find a good squire, it should last your kid several years, and if he doesn't like it, you can always get a new guitar, or just upgrade the squire. I know many people that upgraded their squires and now their squire is better than a $1000 fender.

As for the amp, there are many options for good beginner amps. My favorite one is the Roland Cube 15W. It's louder than the microcube, and cost less too. It has digital modelling, which means it can replicate the sounds of different amps. It also has built-in effects.
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