#1
Whats the difference between C2 and C9 or C13 and C6 surely they're exactly the same notes and therefore the same chord e.g C2 and C9 = CDEG
#3
Ah i see C9 is C2 but with a 7th beacause 7+2=9!!!

Does that mean Cadd9 has no 7th

ALso in the last five mins i've read in another thread that the official name for C2 is Cadd9 and that C2 doesn't exist. any reason for this?
#4
Quote by doive
Whats the difference between C2 and C9 or C13 and C6 surely they're exactly the same notes and therefore the same chord e.g C2 and C9 = CDEG


For "add" chords it depends on the octave you're adding the note in. In a root position C chord where C is the lowest note if you were to add the D note a whole step above that C (the second note in the C Major scale) it would be an Cadd2. However, it's much more common to add the D note an octave above the C root note which results in the Cadd9.

In an actual 9th chord you need to include the seventh.

In a 13 chord you have to include all the previous extensions - the 7th, 9th, 11th, along with the 13. I believe that generally the 5th is omitted from 13th chords.
#5
^Once you're past sevenths, all you need is a 7th, not everything else... like the following, with all "unecessary" tones omitted:

maj7 = 1 3 7
maj9 = 1 3 7 9
maj11 = 1 3 7 11
maj13 = 1 3 7 13

C2 is a bad name. I've never seen it used, and most people think it's dumb when you spell the chord that way. A C9 is a dominant 9 chord, 1 3 5 b7 9. Perhaps you're thinking "Cadd9," 1 3 5 9. A C6 is a "C major 6," 1 3 5 6. A C13 is a dominant 13th chord, 1 3 5 b7 13.

It's not that simple lol...
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#6
/\ I would agree with redwing. also , I would not write add9 as add2 . as long as there is a 3rd in the chord I would not use an interval of a 2nd in the chords spelling.

you would only use a 2nd for spelling a suspension. ( sus2 )
#7
Quote by redwing_suck

maj7 = 1 3 7
maj9 = 1 3 7 9
maj11 = 1 3 7 11
maj13 = 1 3 7 13



Kind of a stupid question, but you can add 5ths in there as well without changing the chord's name, right? Are there any specific times when you would voice it with a 5th besides "to make it sound fuller?"
#8
/\ yes , you can always add the ( perfect ) 5th to the chord without changing it's name.

what redwing was pointing out was that all chord tones are not nessesary , and alot of times on guitar not physically playable.
#9
Another note, when in a chord you have 4 notes, 1 2 3 5 this would not be Csus2(C as the root for the example). Whenever you have a 3 and a 2 you call the 2 a 9. So it would be Cadd9, whatever voicing/inversion its in.

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#10
right. no suspended chord can have a 3rd.


and......both C2 and Cadd2 are incorrect chord symbols.
#11
The question is: how do you know it's a C chord?

The notes are C-D-G. The notes in a Gsus4 are G-C-D. The order of notes makes absolutely no difference in naming a chord.

Many chords have synonyms, like C6 (C-E-G-A) and Am7 (A-C-E-G). It's the context in the song's harmony that determines what the chord root is, not the lowest note, or even the preferences of the songwriter - there's certainly no guarantee that they understand harmony... imagine fingering 022100 and calling it a Q6 chord. Should the rest of the band learn that term for it because it's what the writer dictated, or should the songwriter learn that the rest of the world calls it E major?

As I said earlier, all the 'sus2' chords I've ever seen should be named 'sus4' with a different root, or they are not chords at all - just fingerings - with the second being a passing tone, an auxiliary tone, or a neighbor tone of a simple triad. It's the resolution in the harmony that matters.

It's really no wonder most performers on other instruments don't consider guitarists 'real musicians' (I am not making this up - I hear it all the time from music educators). We seem to be the only ones who keep on trying to create new terms for things that have been around for 400 years, and insist ours is the right way. It would be fine if we had a logical basis for that - but since the average guitarist holds views on power chords, sus chords, modes, etc. that are based on internet tabs rather than music history, harmony, etc., it really shores up the view that we're weak as musicians.
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#13
^^^^For that first part, doesnt the letter of a Chord usually depend on the bass note?

So for a C chord to be an actual C chord doesnt the lowest/bass note always have to be a C?

And second
Quote by Freeze1186
For "add" chords it depends on the octave you're adding the note in. In a root position C chord where C is the lowest note if you were to add the D note a whole step above that C (the second note in the C Major scale) it would be an Cadd2. However, it's much more common to add the D note an octave above the C root note which results in the Cadd9.

In an actual 9th chord you need to include the seventh.

In a 13 chord you have to include all the previous extensions - the 7th, 9th, 11th, along with the 13. I believe that generally the 5th is omitted from 13th chords.


How do you know what a 5th/7th/9th/11th is?
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