#1
I didn't take any music classes yet but I'm thinking of majoring in music. I'm gonna choose the guitar as the instrument. They said you choose the instrument you want to play with when you join. So anyone took music class before? And is it hard? I'm gonna start from music 100 I guess lol
#2
My music teacher told me it was pretty hard. you have to know a lot of theory. this may have just been a specific class, but he said the teacher would play a mode and you were expected to know what it is just by listening.

but i guess it depends on the school. I know some schools have seperate programs, such as the classical or the jazz program.
#3
if you decide to, i would go with something like jazz. if you're after playing rock, blues is really close and a lot of rock developed by blues. i know it's gonna be a jazz class, but trust me, half of it's blues. and the theory won't kill you.
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#4
telling modes isnt that hard the only really difficult ones are dorian-aolean and mixolydian-ionian lydian and locrian are very unique though
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#6
Quote by metalmaster362
telling modes isnt that hard the only really difficult ones are dorian-aolean and mixolydian-ionian lydian and locrian are very unique though


i find dorian quite easy to hear because the root note just begs you to play the tonic...i.e. play an A Dorian scale ascending and descending starting and ending on A...it just screams for G

i've heard that college-level music classes are very demanding, and if you're looking to be a music major, your chances are slim without complete passion with what you do and the will to make it happen...very theory-heavy, i'm looking towards studying classical in college, which is the basis behind many styles of music today, including jazz, rock, and metal..most music colleges don't even contain metal-based classes or lessons (except Berklee)
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#7
Quote by grrrr
I didn't take any music classes yet but I'm thinking of majoring in music. I'm gonna choose the guitar as the instrument. They said you choose the instrument you want to play with when you join. So anyone took music class before? And is it hard? I'm gonna start from music 100 I guess lol
Previous posters have made an issue of modes, but in my experience modes are quite straightforward as taught in college-level theory. In my opinion the #1 thing you should do before beginning a study of music theory in college is abolutely hammer standard notation. Standard notation is the language of music theory and your professors will expect you to be comfortable with it before you get there. At least, that was my experience. Good luck and enjoy the ride - college-level music theory is actually a lot of fun!
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#8
i think the thing to do is look at the descriptions of the beggining classes and see what you know and what you might want to practice before you start. like gpb said, you are probably going to want to at least start learning how to read sheet music before you go. im taking a intro to theory class this fall at my college, just as a kinda fun thing. unfortunatly thats all i can take without majoring or minoring in music (which im not planning on doing). this is the course description for what im taking:
1005-1006: THEORY/FUNDAMENTALS
Development of understanding the basic components of the composition of music through reading and writing the symbolic notation as it appears on the page, and realizing the experimental and expressive content of music performance through singing, ear training, and practice at a keyboard instrument.

thats probably similar to what most 100/1000 level courses are going to be like. find the course catalog of the university you are/want to attend and see what their courses are like to give you a better idea of what you will be doing.
#9
It's more than just the things you need to know about music, such as scales and music notations. It's experience too. I've been in the music scene for over six years with classes and private teachers. So I know that college level classes ARE quite demanding. You need to be so experienced that sight reading will be simple for you. Don't just go in there expecting to audition like an amature . I suggest you take a lower level class and see how you like it... or if you can afford it, get a private teacher for a few months so you can keep up with a few of the overly experienced players you'll see in college. You may still struggle for a year or two until you catch up

Keep in mind I'm only talking about a majority of colleges. There are still a few places that welcome first-timers...make sure ya don't go crazy