#1
I'm really pi**ed off cuz i gotta make a solo for this song thats in E minor and I'm trying to use the E minor pentatonic but i seem to be getting a sort of happy sound out of it??
I have also tried using the E aeolian but i get the same sound with it?? Its really annoying me!

I also have to make a sort of melodic lick that can be harmonised and i cant think of anything......

Any suggestions?
#3
hmmm...try phrygian...it never lets me down for a dreary solo
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#4
well its a metal song and the what i have to solo over is the verse riff, the chorus riff and the bridge riff so here it is...

Verse - E5 palm muted at 16th notes with stabs from F5 and G5

Chorus - G5 with a palm muted galloping rythm and stabs from A#5 then F#5

Bridge - E5 F#5 G5 A#5 A5 just ringing
#5
You're playing random notes within the aeolian scale, I guarantee it. Let each note have a little more life at first, get used to the aeolian sound. Work with different combinations/series of notes and see how they sound when played together/in series. It's matter of practice and time. Aeolian is minor, it's sad-sounding, you can't get around it... just work with it. We can't write it for you.
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#6
Try writing fills between the stabs. That's my guess. Add some dissonance too it.
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#7
Quote by redwing_suck
Aeolian is minor, it's sad-sounding, you can't get around it... just work with it. We can't write it for you.


no, I want a sad sound but i'm getting a happy sound for some reason?


EDIT: well not happy, just not sad if you get what i mean
#8
Could you post the mode you are using. Maybe you're playing the wrong one?
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#9
Quote by GuitarSymphony
Could you post the mode you are using. Maybe you're playing the wrong one?



well as the thread name suggests, i am using the E aeolian


EDIT: Could i post an mp3 on this site? its what i have to work with
#10
Quote by Luke666
well as the thread name suggests, i am using the E aeolian


EDIT: Could i post an mp3 on this site? its what i have to work with


I mean like a tabualture.
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#11
Quote by GuitarSymphony
I mean like a tabualture.


what would you like a tab of? The song i have to solo over or the mode that i am using?

If it help i could post the song as an mp3?
#12
Quote by Luke666
what would you like a tab of? The song i have to solo over or the mode that i am using?

If it help i could post the song as an mp3?


Both would definitely help.
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#14
That won't really help. I wrote a lead riff for the intro cuz the guitar is pretty simple. But I still need of the tab u are using so I can make sure you are using the aeolian scale.
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#15
To really get the sound of the aeolian mode you want to be playing over minor chords (Am, Em, Gm etc) Other than that, make sure you're not just playing random notes. More important than the scale is what you do with it. Here Vai plays the Lydian (general considered the happiest mode) and Mixolydian modes and makes them sound incredibly sad and melodic.
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#16
Another good idea.... at least what i try to do when I want..... well it's more of a dramatic, strong sounding chord, is a do what I like to refer to as a "drop powerchord". I'm sure that's not the correct name. And I'm not sure exactly what to call it. But instead of say

D--5
A--5
E--3

I'd use

D--5
A--3
E--3

It's replacing your fifth of the chord with the fourth. IE G C G, instead of G D G.
You've probably figured this out by now, but there's a suggestion.
Also, phrygian is great for sad, dreary sounding solos.
Locrian too, in it's own sense.
#17
Quote by MisinformingYou
D--5
A--5
E--3

I'd use

D--5
A--3
E--3
That second chord is a C chord, not a G chord. There's nothing wrong with playing C, but it is not G.
#18
I'd just play the hell out of the b3, and have your phrases moving down a lot.
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#19
Quote by bangoodcharlote
That second chord is a C chord, not a G chord. There's nothing wrong with playing C, but it is not G.


Technically speaking, it could be considered a Gsus4 (no 5th), and chords are often voiced in this manner to provide an nice alternative to your typical power chord.

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#20
Quote by Spynal
Technically speaking, it could be considered a Gsus4 (no 5th), and chords are often voiced in this manner to provide an nice alternative to your typical power chord.


While it could be, it really depends on the context. I'd just call it a C5, though.

Back on topic...
Try harmonic or melodic minor. It's still minor but it sounds to me you haven't tried anything but pentatonic minor and natural minor (which are almost the same thing, just one is missing a few notes). Give it a try and pay attention to your phrasing, too. Mix up your note values and add rests.
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#21
Quote by gogita21
While it could be, it really depends on the context. I'd just call it a C5, though.


I'd call it whatever is correct given the usage of the chord in context of the piece. Coincidentally, I would also be correct in doing so every time

I mean, if it's being used as a Gsus4 (no 5th), as it often is, "just calling it a C5" is just plain wrong.
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#22
hmm..getting a happy sound out of Aeolian? Thats odd...Aeolian is the minor scale, that shouldnt happen. I've never had this problem though, so i cant really help, sorry


Quote by MisinformingYou
Another good idea.... at least what i try to do when I want..... well it's more of a dramatic, strong sounding chord, is a do what I like to refer to as a "drop powerchord". I'm sure that's not the correct name. And I'm not sure exactly what to call it. But instead of say

D--5
A--5
E--3

I'd use

D--5
A--3
E--3

It's replacing your fifth of the chord with the fourth. IE G C G, instead of G D G.
You've probably figured this out by now, but there's a suggestion.
Also, phrygian is great for sad, dreary sounding solos.
Locrian too, in it's own sense.


Thats not always the case, because even though it IS replacing the fifth of the chord with the fourth, it is also, taking your example, taking an C5 and adding the 5th to the bottom of the chord. For that case, you might want to add the octave C to the top of the chord to make it sound fuller. But it does make it heavier.
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#23
Quote by Spynal
I'd call it whatever is correct given the usage of the chord in context of the piece. Coincidentally, I would also be correct in doing so every time

I mean, if it's being used as a Gsus4 (no 5th), as it often is, "just calling it a C5" is just plain wrong.

When I said I'd just call it a C5, I meant in the open context given. I know to call it what it needs to be in context.
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#24
If you are playing the E minor pentatonic shape over a G chord (your song's chorus), it will sound like G major pentatonic. That may be what you are hearing as the happy sound.
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#25
Quote by UnderTheGroove
If you are playing the E minor pentatonic shape over a G chord (your song's chorus), it will sound like G major pentatonic. That may be what you are hearing as the happy sound.


oh yeah lol!!
why didnt i work that out? (prolly cause i'm a 'tard lol)

anyways, what scale do you suggest i use ove the G passage? I was Listening to it a second ago and i mean REALLY listening to it and it came across as if it had a Locrian sound to it....I might be completely wrong though lol


thanks for everyones help so far
#26
I was thinking techincally it was a G major sus4 with the fifth. But.... can you explain why in the context, it would be a C and not the above G. I mean... yes.... it could be considered a C major. But is the G, the lowest note, not the root of the note?

I've stuggled with this point for a while, and if someone has time to explain what differentiates one from the other, and why, that would be wicked.

Thanks.
#27
Quote by MisinformingYou
I was thinking techincally it was a G major sus4 with the fifth. But.... can you explain why in the context, it would be a C and not the above G. I mean... yes.... it could be considered a C major. But is the G, the lowest note, not the root of the note?

I've stuggled with this point for a while, and if someone has time to explain what differentiates one from the other, and why, that would be wicked.

Thanks.


Usually, it is the lowest note which determines its root, however, if you look at this chord in more detail, you'll notice it is a powerchord, it has the notes G C G.

Now, if we take the lowest note in this case, which is G, and work out the G5 chord, it has the notes: G D, which is no good in this case, we need the notes G and C.

So the next 'chord' we can look at is C5. This 'chord' has the notes C and G which fits perfectly. But we also have the lowest note, G. This could effectivly be the bass note, and we can make it a slash chord:
C5/G

This is just one way of writing it. You could, if you wanted just call it C5 and it'd still be right.


Naming chords in progressions can also depend on what other chords are also in the progression.
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